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Posted: 9/18/2009 5:45:56 AM EST
Just for lightweight yard work. Tree trimming mainly.

Stihl, Husqvarna, Homelite [do they still make them?]

Doesn't need anything more than a 14" bar. And whats a good price range if you happen to know?

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:48:01 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:48:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 5:49:36 AM EST by Alaskacajun]
I'm about to buy a Stihl MS260 Pro or an MS290.... I've been reading about chainsaws for 2 weeks and these are the 2 that I think will work for me, for what that's worth!

You can go to Stihl's website and fill out a survey that tells you which one will work for you!

http://www.stihlusa.com/productselector/saw_selector.html

- Clint
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:50:23 AM EST
Whatever brand this one is:


Needs to work well on zombies.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:52:09 AM EST
Buy a orange one.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:52:32 AM EST
I hate chainsaws...never start when you want them to...many hours cussing over chainsaws...
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:53:01 AM EST
I have a little Stihl that is excellent and my father has a little Echo that is just as good.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:53:34 AM EST
I have an Echo and a Husky. Both are orange.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:53:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By scootr29:
I hate chainsaws...never start when you want them to...many hours cussing over chainsaws...


Like a gun, they need cleaning.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:55:34 AM EST
I have a Stihl MS 390 and I love it. It is the first chainsaw I have owned that is actually a pleasure to run.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:57:09 AM EST
Stihl or Husky are going to do whatever job you have to get done.

I have 2 stihls
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:58:51 AM EST
Stihl all the way. My father has cut 6 cords of wood per season since 1980 with his model 028. He has even dropped a tree on it once or twice, and it is still kickin. I own two myself and have never had a problem with them. happy shopping.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 5:59:54 AM EST
my tree cutting buddies all us stihl
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:00:28 AM EST
Another Echo guy here.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:01:18 AM EST
Originally Posted By Taboot:
Originally Posted By scootr29:
I hate chainsaws...never start when you want them to...many hours cussing over chainsaws...


Like a gun, they need cleaning.


No it is all the shit that is produced and sold at Home Depot.....plastic this and plastic that....I wanna a small chainsaw that is made from steel....

Any ideas?
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:01:23 AM EST
Stihl.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:02:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 6:02:20 AM EST by Ricoch3T]
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Stihl.


x2... expensive but will run forever. Least mine does/has
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:02:10 AM EST
Buy a stihl farm boss. You won't be disappointed, unless your used to running a ms361 that is.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:02:33 AM EST
I asked the same question about 6 months ago. Stihl and Husqvarna were very popular recommendations. I got the Husqvarna 20" and man, it chews up anything I throw at it. I've loaned it out to my BIL's a couple of times and they've punished it as well and it keeps on ticking.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:02:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Stihl.


Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:06:32 AM EST
Stihl.

Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:09:27 AM EST
You have 3 choices:

-Stihl
-Huskie
-everything else.

Stick with the first two.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:11:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 6:13:00 AM EST by terrafirma]
drain the gas and run the carb dry after you're done using it. also, don't buy junk.

I run a Stihl MS250 for small stuff although I've taken down a 26'' Red Oak with it and an early 90's 044....LOVE the 044.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:12:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 6:21:10 AM EST by jwr6]
Guys, the guy is going to trim some limbs once a year...he isn't going into tree surgeon business, pulpwooding, or even cutting down a few hickories and oaks every fall to feed the wood stove next year.

OP, you'll be fine with a 14" poulan if you insist on a gas saw. Your level of work (depending on how big your yard is) can be handled with an electric chainsaw. Keep a sharp chain, you'll be fine. If you want to spend $500 on a saw, you can, and it will be a great saw, but you don't need it.

This being arfcom, expect 100 posts of "stihl" and "husky", they are good saws, but they are overkill for 99% of the chainsaw using population. My dad's 16" homelite has cut more trees than some of these guys have ever seen. Running the carb dry and keeping a sharp chain mean a whole lot more than what brand it is unless your job or life depends on the saw. A homelite or poulan will still be running 20-30 years from now if all it does is cut down several trees a year. But, you did ask "what's the best" not "what do I need", so everyone else here isn't incorrect.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:13:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 6:14:33 AM EST by FZ1Steve]
A neighbor had a tree down. My saw had not been started in years so I knew it would not start. Another neighbor came over with a Stihl and cut up the tree. He said that he had not use the Stihl in years and it fired right up. Even if he put it up with fuel stabil, it was pretty impressive. Also I have heard good things about Husky.
But if you are just working in your yard, an electric saw might work better for you.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:15:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By terrafirma:
drain the gas and run the carb dry after you're done using it. also, don't buy junk.


This is excellent advice, my dad always told me to do that, maybe thats why his 15 year old stihl still runs like new.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:16:44 AM EST

Stihl, Echo or Husky are all good saws. I have an Echo CS-360T, I wanted a light saw with a big engine (for it's size).
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:17:24 AM EST
I've got a Husky, it is a great saw. My best advice is to get one from a saw shop not Home Depot, Lowe's, etc. They may cost a little bit more, but if you ever need warranty service it is much less of a hassle ie: I bought a Toro mower at Home Depot that had a pin hole in the carb float, when I took it the local Toro repair center for repair they said to return it to Home Depot since they were not the authorized repair center for products purchased there. Home Depot didn't want to return it since I'd used it to mow (all of two passes) the yard. I wound up fixing the float myself and haven't had a problem in the 4 years since. All this headache for a $9 piece of plastic. Need less to say I don't buy power equipment at Home Depot anymore and won't use the local repair center either. Luckily they are a different company than the saw shop.

YMMV
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:18:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:


This is excellent advice, my dad always told me to do that, maybe thats why his 15 year old stihl still runs like new.

My pops has a Stihl as old as me. Still runs great.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:18:25 AM EST
Originally Posted By Brians_45:
I have a Stihl MS 390 and I love it. It is the first chainsaw I have owned that is actually a pleasure to run.


Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:19:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By scootr29:
Originally Posted By Taboot:
Originally Posted By scootr29:
I hate chainsaws...never start when you want them to...many hours cussing over chainsaws...


Like a gun, they need cleaning.


No it is all the shit that is produced and sold at Home Depot.....plastic this and plastic that....I wanna a small chainsaw that is made from steel....

Any ideas?


I dunno. My Stihl had a variety of materials. Probably too much plastic for your tastes. I haven't found the material it is constructed from to affect difficulty of starting though. When mine has a tough time starting, usually a quick clean-up of the carb and some fresh gas mix does the trick.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:20:07 AM EST
Latest is a Home Depot Poulan on clearance and it's an unwieldy POS. Starts everytime, but wouldn't want to climb with it.

IMHO, the best for light work and to climb with is a little ECHO 330. The most important thing is to keep your chain sharp and be safe.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:21:41 AM EST
Stihl
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:22:59 AM EST
Stihl

I work for a .gov Natural Resources organization. We only run Stihl and those things get the shit beat out of them and keep on ticking for years and years and years.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:23:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By jwr6:
Guys, the guy is going to trim some limbs once a year...he isn't going into tree surgeon business, pulpwooding, or even cutting down a few hickories and oaks every fall to feed the wood stove next year.

OP, you'll be fine with a 14" poulan if you insist on a gas saw. Your level of work (depending on how big your yard is) can be handled with an electric chainsaw. Keep a sharp chain, you'll be fine. If you want to spend $500 on a saw, you can, and it will be a great saw, but you don't need it.



Yard is an acre. Got four apple trees, two large pines and two hawthorne. Both need much trimming, so do pines. Also have some misc. trees/bushes that need to go. I would also like to butcher up some blackberries but I don't know how well that would work out.

Stihl and Husqvarna sound like the most popular/best. But, you are right, I don't want to dump 500 into something that will be used infrequently. Half that amount, maybe.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:24:24 AM EST
Stihl.


I have a MS360
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:25:23 AM EST
Stihl Super Farm Boss.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:29:25 AM EST
Echo or Husqvarna. Always had good fortune with those two brands.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:30:34 AM EST
I have a small Husqvarna I bought new and it works good but I need to take it to get it repaired as it leaks bar oil. I probably used it on tougher wood then it was designed for as I used it to cut some railroad ties and pressure treated wood and that was when the problems started. Mine is a 14-inch unit which is adequate for most smaller jobs but railroad ties are tough to cut so I screwed up using that saw I think.

I also have an older MAC and that chainsaw is built like a tank. I picked that one up in a yardsale for only $10 as the previous owner couldn't get it running. I dumped the gas, changed the sparkplug and added new gas and she started right up. I think that one has an 16 or 18-inch bar.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:32:49 AM EST
Orange with "PRO" written on it.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:33:15 AM EST
I picked up a Husqvarna 445 a few weeks back and I love it.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:35:33 AM EST
Gonna go out on a limb (ha ha) here

I have a Poulan Woodshark 14" that I bought from Kmart in 2000 and it just humms right along. Still has the original sparkplug in it, starts on 5 pulls EVERY TIME.

BUT.....ever since I've owned it I start it once a month (if I haven't been using it) just to let it run and make certain the oil/gas mix doesn't clog up the fuel line.

I bought it just to cut firewood while camping in AZ, but since I moved back to MO I use it FAR MORE helping friends of mine cut cordwood. It's STILL performing admirably-even though the directions say, in bold type, NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE

However, you just cannot go wrong with Stihl or Husky. They're a little pricey, but you get what you pay for.

I paid $70 for my Poulan.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:36:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By jwr6:
Guys, the guy is going to trim some limbs once a year...he isn't going into tree surgeon business, pulpwooding, or even cutting down a few hickories and oaks every fall to feed the wood stove next year.

OP, you'll be fine with a 14" poulan if you insist on a gas saw. Your level of work (depending on how big your yard is) can be handled with an electric chainsaw. Keep a sharp chain, you'll be fine. If you want to spend $500 on a saw, you can, and it will be a great saw, but you don't need it.

This being arfcom, expect 100 posts of "stihl" and "husky", they are good saws, but they are overkill for 99% of the chainsaw using population. My dad's 16" homelite has cut more trees than some of these guys have ever seen. Running the carb dry and keeping a sharp chain mean a whole lot more than what brand it is unless your job or life depends on the saw. A homelite or poulan will still be running 20-30 years from now if all it does is cut down several trees a year. But, you did ask "what's the best" not "what do I need", so everyone else here isn't incorrect.


Yeah, if you want to have a running saw for a year or two. Those things are junk. Ymmv.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:36:57 AM EST
I been wonderin about this myself. We need "the Chart" for chainsaws...
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:43:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By BR870:
I been wonderin about this myself. We need "the Chart" for chainsaws...



How 'bout a "box o' truth"?
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:47:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By jwr6:
Guys, the guy is going to trim some limbs once a year...he isn't going into tree surgeon business, pulpwooding, or even cutting down a few hickories and oaks every fall to feed the wood stove next year.

OP, you'll be fine with a 14" poulan if you insist on a gas saw. Your level of work (depending on how big your yard is) can be handled with an electric chainsaw. Keep a sharp chain, you'll be fine. If you want to spend $500 on a saw, you can, and it will be a great saw, but you don't need it.

This being arfcom, expect 100 posts of "stihl" and "husky", they are good saws, but they are overkill for 99% of the chainsaw using population. My dad's 16" homelite has cut more trees than some of these guys have ever seen. Running the carb dry and keeping a sharp chain mean a whole lot more than what brand it is unless your job or life depends on the saw. A homelite or poulan will still be running 20-30 years from now if all it does is cut down several trees a year. But, you did ask "what's the best" not "what do I need", so everyone else here isn't incorrect.


I used to work in Lawnmower/small engine repair when I was a kid. Those carb jets, pistons, portsetc are ridiculously small. Using it a couple times a year and leaving the dirty gas in the tank and float bowls is a surefire way to clog em up and spend a half hour starting it every day. Running it dry and keeping the chain sharp is something 99% users would never do but should.
GOOD ADVICE.


Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:57:52 AM EST
I have a 345 16" Husky that I have tried to kill, it keeps on going. I have the 455 rancher as well, it runs great and chews trees up. All our fire service vent saws and cut off saws are Husky. I keep extra chains, bars, plugs and never have problems.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:07:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By Wheelie:
Originally Posted By jwr6:
Guys, the guy is going to trim some limbs once a year...he isn't going into tree surgeon business, pulpwooding, or even cutting down a few hickories and oaks every fall to feed the wood stove next year.

OP, you'll be fine with a 14" poulan if you insist on a gas saw. Your level of work (depending on how big your yard is) can be handled with an electric chainsaw. Keep a sharp chain, you'll be fine. If you want to spend $500 on a saw, you can, and it will be a great saw, but you don't need it.

This being arfcom, expect 100 posts of "stihl" and "husky", they are good saws, but they are overkill for 99% of the chainsaw using population. My dad's 16" homelite has cut more trees than some of these guys have ever seen. Running the carb dry and keeping a sharp chain mean a whole lot more than what brand it is unless your job or life depends on the saw. A homelite or poulan will still be running 20-30 years from now if all it does is cut down several trees a year. But, you did ask "what's the best" not "what do I need", so everyone else here isn't incorrect.


Yeah, if you want to have a running saw for a year or two. Those things are junk. Ymmv.


It depends on what your doing with it, I clear trees In northern AZ as a second job,I have 2 ms361s and 1 ms360.Ive had the 360 for about 6 years it has cut a lot of trees and taken a ton of abuse,outside of changing bars and chains i have not needed to do anything to it.The ms361 is a freaking cadillac compared to the 360,Its lighter,more powerfull,and it starts easy.When you have to fall,buck and haul away several tons of ponderosa pine
and your cutting on ankle twisting slopes the last thing you want is a heavy under powered saw that takes 10 pulls to start each time.If I were just pruning trees a few times a year Than I would not be as opinionated,most people dont need a sthil or a husky,but I for one would never own a homelight or poulan.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:09:59 AM EST
Stihl!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:10:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Stihl.


Will say they are great for clean up after hurricanes.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:13:56 AM EST
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