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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/23/2005 9:45:42 PM EDT
Been thinking about this for a while, I like the sort of primitive aspect of it, and that it seems to take more skill in order to master.

So, what would be the best bow for a beginner?(cost isn't an option as I am just looking)
What are so useful things I need to know?

Any help would be appreciated
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:48:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
Been thinking about this for a while, I like the sort of primitive aspect of it, and that it seems to take more skill in order to master.

So, what would be the best bow for a beginner?(cost isn't an option as I am just looking)
What are so useful things I need to know?

Any help would be appreciated



Build you own bow and arrows.
Ferrets Archery Webpage Good page with tons of info. Its addictive. I built a board bow since there isnt any good hardwood in Florida.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:51:54 PM EDT
get one of those 77/22s that launches a arrow with a blank
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:51:55 PM EDT
Decide whether you want a simple recurve, or compound bow.

Then go to a pro shop, get fitted for your measurements.

Then go to a bow hunting safety course. In most places you need a bow to participate, at least in NY. There is a lot to learn there. I'm a certified archery instructor with the NAA and am going to become an NRA certified firearms instructor next year (after my 21st birthday).

Good luck, have fun, I shoot my bow more than I shoot my guns.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:57:20 PM EDT
How much money you got?

You can spend a little, you can spend a lot.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:59:40 PM EDT
I think I'd be more interested in a compound bow for hunting around here since the archery season on deer opens well before the rifle season
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:07:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
I think I'd be more interested in a compound bow for hunting around here since the archery season on deer opens well before the rifle season



Well there are lots of options out there, I've had a few bows. I liked my Hoyt's the best as far as value and features. Also look at Martin, PSE, Browning, Archery Research (division of browning), Barnett, Easton, and lots of others. I really like what Archery Research is doing, but some of it is expensive.

But after saying all those names, don't get caught up in name brands, do a lot of research, and test out the bows you like if you can.


Important things to consider in looking at compound bows are the let-off (compound bows have cams, or eccentrics that are designed to make the shooter use less force to hold the bow at full draw, so if it's 90% let-off with a 50 pound draw, you're only holding back 5 pounds of draw), also the adjustability, you might want to start out shooting 45 or 50 pound draw, but will want to bump up to 65 or 70 for deer hunting.

Also, use carbon fiber or other composite arrows, lighter, faster, stronger, straighter than aluminum.

Is there an archery/bowhunting forum?
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:09:15 PM EDT
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:12:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:14:09 PM EDT
In my opinion if you are going to shoot a compound then stick with a rifle. Traditional or primitive archery is the best way to go if you want to experience real archery. There is a reason it's called a primitive weapons season and that is because you should actually use traditional or primitive weapons.
If you are in a survival situation you would actually know how to build an effective weapon. The world dosen't need another high-tech buy every new gadget on the market archer.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:14:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



Plenty of good stuff in that price range. Look for older model Mathews unless you want something really new. eBay is also a good source for bows.

Plan on spending around $100 for arrows and broadheads. Muzzy is a good choice there. Arrows I would recommend are the Beman ICS Hunters. About $70 for a dozen.

Sight and rest will cost you around $100 as well.

Check out the Reflex line.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:15:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Autodog:
In my opinion if you are going to shoot a compound then stick with a rifle. Traditional or primitive archery is the best way to go if you want to experience real archery. There is a reason it's called a primitive weapons season and that is because you should actually use traditional or primitive weapons.
If you are in a survival situation you would actually know how to build an effective weapon. The world dosen't need another high-tech buy every new gadget on the market archer.



Excuse me while I .
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:16:14 PM EDT
)

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



Ah yes, I also suggest learning to shoot bare bow. Just the riser, limbs, string, and arrow (granted you need a nocking point and stuff too).

Basically, no sights, no little gadgets and dohickies (sp?), just you and a bow.

You'll be a much better shooter after you master (or at least become proficient) in this.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:19:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Burley:

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



Plenty of good stuff in that price range. Look for older model Mathews unless you want something really new. eBay is also a good source for bows.

Plan on spending around $100 for arrows and broadheads. Muzzy is a good choice there. Arrows I would recommend are the Beman ICS Hunters. About $70 for a dozen.

Sight and rest will cost you around $100 as well.

Check out the Reflex line.



Beman and muzzy's, that's my combination, spring loaded heads are retarded.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:27:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/23/2005 10:37:18 PM EDT by TheTracker]

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



You can get a real nice bow for that amount of money. Include your sight and arrows and quiver and release and you will go over the $600 mark but it will be a bow that will last as long as you want it to.I have been bow hunting for a long time and there's nothing like it. And can't even compare it to rifle hunting .Its up close and personal. You might go a season or two without a kill but it dosen't matter .Its just so intense. I almost have completly stopped rifle hunting altogether.I hunt whitetails and turkey with my bows. One very important thing is go to a proshop and get fitted with the right draw length ,even thou you might pay a little more then buying a bow through mail order. Go with a compound for your first one.I shoot both but a compound is easier for a begginer archer to learn to shoot. good luck
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:49:48 PM EDT
I wanted into archery. I bought a nice bow, spent bucks putting it together with the latest and greatest doohickies and thingamabobs, tuned it in, and when I took it out shooting after I sighted it in, all the arrows went right next to eachother at 45 yards. I should have been happy, but there was no skill in it, so I was disappointed. I shoulda went primative.


But that is just me. It was fun to buy and tune and so on, and the technology involved in archery stuff these days boggles the mind. I think the lack of "heart" that is in modern archery was what left me underwhelmed, considering the huge amount of history and variety of archery equipment.

horsebows.com/ I think is what I should have gotten into the first time around.

Primitive Archer Magazine is a quarterly mag that is phenominal in content, and is a must for any outdoorsman, not just archery buffs.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:04:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
)

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



Ah yes, I also suggest learning to shoot bare bow. Just the riser, limbs, string, and arrow (granted you need a nocking point and stuff too).

Basically, no sights, no little gadgets and dohickies (sp?), just you and a bow.

You'll be a much better shooter after you master (or at least become proficient) in this.


+1 to this, for the longest time when I was a kid, I shot with a cheap crappy compound that had no sights, I got very good with it, when I finally moved to a decent bow with sights and release and such, and I was freaking deadly out to 80 yards. I'll also toss in a +1 for Martin bows, I and my friends use them exclusively, mainly because we live about 10 min from their factory. I've shot with Martin and his boys before as well. Great guy.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:04:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By yekimak:
I wanted into archery. I bought a nice bow, spent bucks putting it together with the latest and greatest doohickies and thingamabobs, tuned it in, and when I took it out shooting after I sighted it in, all the arrows went right next to eachother at 45 yards. I should have been happy, but there was no skill in it, so I was disappointed. I shoulda went primative.


But that is just me. It was fun to buy and tune and so on, and the technology involved in archery stuff these days boggles the mind. I think the lack of "heart" that is in modern archery was what left me underwhelmed, considering the huge amount of history and variety of archery equipment.

horsebows.com/ I think is what I should have gotten into the first time around.

Primitive Archer Magazine is a quarterly mag that is phenominal in content, and is a must for any outdoorsman, not just archery buffs.




I also like to hunt with a recurve and also I shoot a long bow but sometimes for a beginner hunter it is easier to start with a compound. And shooting at targets with a compound is a lot easier then drawing on a buck without making a noise when he is 10yards from you and your heart feels like it's going to come out of your chest.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:28:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheTracker:



I also like to hunt with a recurve and also I shoot a long bow but sometimes for a beginner hunter it is easier to start with a compound. And shooting at targets with a compound is a lot easier then drawing on a buck without making a noise when he is 10yards from you and your heart feels like it's going to come out of your chest.



I got into it because I wanted to develop a skill, and it was not as tedious and painful a process as I had hoped when I started. I blame the new fangled stuff for that. I envy you guys that can hunt effectively with them, especially the primitive stuff.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 12:40:03 AM EDT
I have shot for almost 20 years. Won many tournaments in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont areas.
Go to a local pro shop. They will fit you for draw length, poundage, etc. They should also have few trade ins laying around the shop that will save you $$$ starting out.
Choose weather you want to shoot traditional, instinctive compound, limited or unlimited style. All have advantages along with disadvantages. I have a make of bow I prefer. But there are so many different types on the market now that I would do a disservice if I attempt to talk you into my brand.
Good luck and welcome to a very addicting sport.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 12:43:28 AM EDT
+1 on go traditional.

Using space age materials in a bow is like using sonar to go bass fishin'
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:23:35 AM EDT

I hope all of the guys yelling for the primitive bows have traded their ARs for a nice primitive flintlock musket.

You should consider a compound, sights, release, etc. just like you would consider putting an AImpoint on your rifle. Everything serves a purpose. When I started shooting a bow, I was shooting fingers and thought that I would never lower myself to using a release aid. Once I figured out I could up the poundage on my bow if I used a release, I could sling arrows faster and flatter and that makes a huge difference to me.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:25:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 6:26:14 AM EDT by PBIR]
You need tight green pants. Do you know any merry men?




(just kidding, I love watching Fred Bear footage)
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:30:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PBIR:
You need tight green pants. Do you know any merry men?




(just kidding, I love watching Fred Bear footage)



Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:31:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:


Important things to consider in looking at compound bows are the let-off (compound bows have cams, or eccentrics that are designed to make the shooter use less force to hold the bow at full draw, so if it's 90% let-off with a 50 pound draw, you're only holding back 5 pounds of draw), also the adjustability, you might want to start out shooting 45 or 50 pound draw, but will want to bump up to 65 or 70 for deer hunting.




So why wouldn't you want as much let-off as possible?
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:31:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
)

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By Burley:
Please don't spend $700+ on your first bow.



I don't plan to, I was thinking maybe 400-500



Ah yes, I also suggest learning to shoot bare bow. Just the riser, limbs, string, and arrow (granted you need a nocking point and stuff too).

Basically, no sights, no little gadgets and dohickies (sp?), just you and a bow.

You'll be a much better shooter after you master (or at least become proficient) in this.



+1 This is how I started 27 years ago. I still shoot instinctive from time to time to keep my skills up. It is easy to get caught up in all the gadgets on the market today. The true secret to archery is consistancy and practice, practice, practice.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:35:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:


Important things to consider in looking at compound bows are the let-off (compound bows have cams, or eccentrics that are designed to make the shooter use less force to hold the bow at full draw, so if it's 90% let-off with a 50 pound draw, you're only holding back 5 pounds of draw), also the adjustability, you might want to start out shooting 45 or 50 pound draw, but will want to bump up to 65 or 70 for deer hunting.




So why wouldn't you want as much let-off as possible?



If you should get a trophy buck, Pope and Young only recognize up to 65% let off on a compound as recordable.--------Unless they have changed their rules.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:35:56 AM EDT
Get a compound bow, but try and stick to solo-cam/ single cam+wheel. Dual cams can and do go out of time (string stretch, limb set, numerous reasons). I've owned Mathews, PSE (Baby G), and Bear Bows. Also, try and avoid line anchors although they make changing out line easier, they don't seem to obtain the same velocity as single line set-ups. You should be able to find an outstanding bow w/ overdraw, pin sights, quiver +arrows for 500 bucks used.

I wish I hadn't sold my archery equipment, awesome challenge and lots of fun.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:38:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 6:43:19 AM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:40:00 AM EDT
Jesus Christ......

While there is some good advice in this thread........there is some shit.

Please go to your local Bow Shop and let them fit you for your bow.
Bows are personal items and one size does not fit all.

I used to own an archery shop, and have been bowhunting 20+ years.

Get a top quality COMPOUND bow to begin with.
When and if you master the art of bowhunting, you may decide to get back to basics.

GOOD LUCK.
It will be a very rewarding and exciting way to hunt.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:44:01 AM EDT
I got into bow hunting when I was in college....mainly to extend the hunting season and put more meat on the table.

After two years and daily practice, it got to the point where I had to pick a different point of aim so I wouldn't shatter arrows on every shot

I'm pretty sure that I can shoot a compound bow better than a pistol at most distances.

It was fun, but not all that challenging.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:48:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
I got into bow hunting when I was in college....mainly to extend the hunting season and put more meat on the table.

After two years and daily practice, it got to the point where I had to pick a different point of aim so I wouldn't shatter arrows on every shot

I'm pretty sure that I can shoot a compound bow better than a pistol at most distances.

It was fun, but not all that challenging.



It is great, to show a novice that at twenty yards I can outshoot them with my bow vs. their rifle (freehand).

Not one person has ever not been amazed.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:52:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thinman:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:


Important things to consider in looking at compound bows are the let-off (compound bows have cams, or eccentrics that are designed to make the shooter use less force to hold the bow at full draw, so if it's 90% let-off with a 50 pound draw, you're only holding back 5 pounds of draw), also the adjustability, you might want to start out shooting 45 or 50 pound draw, but will want to bump up to 65 or 70 for deer hunting.




So why wouldn't you want as much let-off as possible?



If you should get a trophy buck, Pope and Young only recognize up to 65% let off on a compound as recordable.--------Unless they have changed their rules.



AFAIK, they have changed. Over 65% you get in the book with an *.

I've been bowhunting for over 25 years. I have been shooting a bow for over 35 years. I started with a bare long bow, a fiberglass jobber, about 65 lbs pull weight. It was a bitch to hold back and shoot.

I like my compounds much better. I wish I could make my arrows hit next to one another at 45 yards consistenly, but I can't. I use 30 yards as my maximum deer shot range. Though in younger days, I have killed one at 35 yards.

I find hunting with the bow to be extrremely gratifying. Less people in the woods and it's quiet.

There is no feeling like having a deer within 20 yards, and you have to draw back that bow without them seeing it, and watching it hit home.

Something about flinging one at a deer, the arrow seems to go in slow motion, and I can track it's fligt to the deer.

I'm due for a new bow, as my existing compund is 1985 technology.

Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:56:06 AM EDT
Thanks for the correction. Haven't checked the book for awhile.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:59:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By entropy:

Originally Posted By thinman:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:


Important things to consider in looking at compound bows are the let-off (compound bows have cams, or eccentrics that are designed to make the shooter use less force to hold the bow at full draw, so if it's 90% let-off with a 50 pound draw, you're only holding back 5 pounds of draw), also the adjustability, you might want to start out shooting 45 or 50 pound draw, but will want to bump up to 65 or 70 for deer hunting.




So why wouldn't you want as much let-off as possible?



If you should get a trophy buck, Pope and Young only recognize up to 65% let off on a compound as recordable.--------Unless they have changed their rules.



AFAIK, they have changed. Over 65% you get in the book with an *.

I've been bowhunting for over 25 years. I have been shooting a bow for over 35 years. I started with a bare long bow, a fiberglass jobber, about 65 lbs pull weight. It was a bitch to hold back and shoot.

I like my compounds much better. I wish I could make my arrows hit next to one another at 45 yards consistenly, but I can't. I use 30 yards as my maximum deer shot range. Though in younger days, I have killed one at 35 yards.

I find hunting with the bow to be extrremely gratifying. Less people in the woods and it's quiet.

There is no feeling like having a deer within 20 yards, and you have to draw back that bow without them seeing it, and watching it hit home.

Something about flinging one at a deer, the arrow seems to go in slow motion, and I can track it's fligt to the deer.

I'm due for a new bow, as my existing compund is 1985 technology.




get a new bow and you'll be able to make those longer shots....the lighter weight of the bow alone will make it easier to stay on target.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:20:41 PM EDT
Since people are talking about releases, remember, if you decide to get one, have your draw length fitted again. When I started using a mechanical release my anchor point was way the hell off.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:25:18 PM EDT
If just shooting for fun, like I'd want to do... I'd get a straight limb longbow.

Personally, I think if you can't shoot a straight limb longbow well, everything else is a crutch.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:47:20 PM EDT
Go try em all out. Personally I prefer traditional archery. I started on a recurve. I got a compound but didn't like the way it felt. Sure it was easier to hit the target with it, and easier to draw. But I like the old world romance of a traditional set up. Eventually I had a bow custom made for me. It always gets attention at the range. It really is a work of art. The best part is when I make the guy next to me shooting a compound do a double take when I strip the fletchings off my arrows with another one. Doesn't happen all to often, but sometimes I'm on a role.

If you feel compounds are going to suit you, great. My only advice is not to get sucked up into all the gadgetry right away until you have shot enough to know what you want in a bow. Make sure you get what you need and have tried out. A lot of products are there to catch hunters, not deer. You may find that you are comfortable shooting instinctively off a simple rest with fingers. Then again, you may prefer fiber optic sight pins, a level, doughnut rest, and a mechanical release.

If you want to go with Traditional equiptment, you'll find that there is far more responsibility on you rather than the bow to hit the target. It takes a lot more practice and consistency of form. But then again, you won't have to buy sights, over draw, special arrow rests, mechanical releases, stablizer, carbon arrows, etc...

Try em both. Either way, you'll have an enjoyable time archery hunting.

And as far as the comment about turning in the ARs if you prefer traditional archery... Why would I? That's what AR's are for. They beg to be accesorized with the latest gizmo, at least for some. I appreciate traditional archery for it's simplicity. I enjoy shooting sports for their own inherit characteristics. If I want to be sneaky, I pull out the bow. If I want to pop a praire dog at 500 yards I pull out the Rem700.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:58:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
If just shooting for fun, like I'd want to do... I'd get a straight limb longbow.

Personally, I think if you can't shoot a straight limb longbow well, everything else is a crutch.



+1
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 6:02:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 6:03:35 AM EDT by KlubMarcus]

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
What are so useful things I need to know? Any help would be appreciated



This end towards enemy.

Seriously though, get matched up with your bow. Don't just buy one that's comfortable. The guy behind the counter should be able to make recommendations based on your height, build, weight. Pulling power can be adjusted over time with today's bows.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 6:12:22 AM EDT
taggage
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 9:36:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 9:49:56 AM EDT by napalm]

Originally Posted By Autodog:
In my opinion if you are going to shoot a compound then stick with a rifle. Traditional or primitive archery is the best way to go if you want to experience real archery. There is a reason it's called a primitive weapons season and that is because you should actually use traditional or primitive weapons.





Yep, which is why I only hunt with an atlatl. I mean, I want to experience real primitive hunting.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 11:47:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:56:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bjwar10:
I hope all of the guys yelling for the primitive bows have traded their ARs for a nice primitive flintlock musket.




The guy said he likes the primitive aspect of it so us folks who make and shoot traditional recommend the primitive aspect of it. It is what he said he liked. Compund bows are nice but they are not what he said he liked. He said primitive.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:58:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:


Get a top quality COMPOUND bow to begin with.




The original poster said "primitive" so some of us took him seriously.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 10:42:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Autodog:
In my opinion if you are going to shoot a compound then stick with a rifle. Traditional or primitive archery is the best way to go if you want to experience real archery. There is a reason it's called a primitive weapons season and that is because you should actually use traditional or primitive weapons.
If you are in a survival situation you would actually know how to build an effective weapon. The world dosen't need another high-tech buy every new gadget on the market archer.



i agree with this wholeheartedly. perhaps i'm being too judgemental, but i always get a kick out of seeing those compound bows with all the crap hanging off of them. i mean, c'mon--peep sights for a bow?

then again, i use aluminum arrows, so i don't have much room to talk, i guess.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 10:55:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bjwar10:
I hope all of the guys yelling for the primitive bows have traded their ARs for a nice primitive flintlock musket.

You should consider a compound, sights, release, etc. just like you would consider putting an AImpoint on your rifle. Everything serves a purpose. When I started shooting a bow, I was shooting fingers and thought that I would never lower myself to using a release aid. Once I figured out I could up the poundage on my bow if I used a release, I could sling arrows faster and flatter and that makes a huge difference to me.



different philosophy, and just as valid. the difference is that my AR is a tool, and for me a bow is a toy, or a way to make myself better. in that light, any of the extras would be a form of cheating. i learned on a straight bow, then graduated to a recurve. straight draw to ear, and vanishing point aim.

i was also taught that bowhunting is about the stalk, and if i couldn't stalk to within 20yd of an animal, i had no business bowhunting to begin with.

not to mention that all that crap hanging off the bow gets snagged on all kinds of undergrowth.

different strokes, though.

Link Posted: 8/26/2005 11:14:24 AM EDT

Wow. Glad to see there are so many stickbow shooters here.

I got into archery/bowhunting about 4 years ago. Its a blast. I started with a recurve and then went to a longbow. I have never shot a compound bow in my life. They are just not for me but if your just looking for extra hunting time I would go with a compound. A few weeks of practice will get you accurate enough at 20-25 yards to hunt then you can toss it on a shelf till next season.

Traditional bows take a lot of practice. I practice 2-3 times a week plus compete all summer at 3D shoots on weekends and I still feel that my max hunting range is 25 yards. That’s ok though. Bowhunting is about getting up close. Most my shots on deer are 5 to 15 yards. Its a rush being that close to them.

If you choose to go trad I would recommend you pick up something used and cheap with a light draw. Around 35-40# at your draw length. Get a couple books and find somebody that can help you out. After you have your form down then you can get a hunting weight bow. Usually 40#+ depending on the law of the state you live in.

Places for info on stickbows are.
www.stickbow.com
www.tradgang.com
www.tradtalk.com

Link Posted: 8/26/2005 11:24:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2005 11:39:40 AM EDT by green-grizzly]
I did it for the first time last year and had a blast. Saw tons of nice bucks, got off one shot, and made a number of stalks. It was just great to see lots of undisturbed animals, and no other hunters.

I just bought a bow after the 2003 season on clearance from Cabela's, and picked up the accessories at the same time on clearance at Wal-Mart. I bought a basic book that explained the ins and outs, and got a few tips from people I know. I toyed around with the set-up all winter, spring and summer, and was fairly competent by the time the season rolled around. It was a lot of fun. I wish I had the time to devote to it this year, but drew too many other tags. Hopefully, I can get a few days off and get out once or twice before the season ends next month.

I got the compound bow and all the goodies (sights, peep, trigger, etc). It was pretty easy to become competent. I think these items shorten the learning curve considerably. For me, bownunting is a way to spend a little more time in the field, not some kind of lifestyle choice.

-green
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 11:33:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WildBoar:

Originally Posted By krpind:


Get a top quality COMPOUND bow to begin with.




The original poster said "primitive" so some of us took him seriously.



He also said he needed educated
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