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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 6/19/2003 7:21:35 PM EDT
I know that an engine with more torque means that it has more oomph to it but "oomph is a terribly unscientific term. Can someone tell me what the difference between the two are technically?
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 7:27:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 7:38:51 PM EDT
(torque x engine speed)/5,252 = horsepower Torque is the force that rotates or turns things around an axis. Plug in WATT in a search engine and enjoy the read. TT [wave]
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 7:41:54 PM EDT
Torque can be though of as the FORCE the engine puts out, measured in pounds/feet. Horsepower is torque includes rpm in the calculation. Torque move cars, horsepower does not. That is why the little Japanese "buzz bombs" need to be really wound up to move away from a stop. you ever drive a cammed up car you will understand. Thing has really poor torque at the bottom so you wind it up to close to the torque peak to let out the clutch. Driving a low torque high horsepower car is WORK. Just as velocity, on paper, makes a bullet look impressive in the energy department, so does horsepower in a car. Torque, like bullet weight, is where it is at.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 7:44:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:01:13 PM EDT
"Torque" is French for "turtle." So it's measuring the same thing using two different animals, horses versus turtles.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:27:21 PM EDT
Simply put torque is a measurement of how hard an engine will pull. Horsepower is a measure of how much faster an engine will want to go.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:28:30 PM EDT
Torque is the power the engine produces. Horspower is how fast the engine produces it.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:35:22 PM EDT
Torque = Force * Perpendicular Distance Torque is real. It's what people buy. When you get pushed into your seat, thats torque. An AMG engineer was quoted as saying, "People buy horsepower, but they LIKE torque." Horsepower is actually a derivative of torque and actually it's the area underneath the torque curve if that means anything to you. Torque is a real force where as horsepower is something made up. I LOVE torque. [:D]
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:38:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2003 8:39:26 PM EDT by MillerSHO]
Originally Posted By DoomPatrol: Torque is the power the engine produces. Horspower is how fast the engine produces it.
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Ding ding ding. We have a winner. Throw in at what various engine speed (RPM) the engine puts out even given HP and Torque number and you can really know how truely powerful the engine is. Peak values are so misleading.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:42:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:46:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 7:32:37 PM EDT by cmjohnson]
A specific definition of torque: Take a wrench that's a foot long, place it on a suitably sized bolt head, and apply ten pounds of pressure to the end of the wrench. You are now applying ten foot pounds of torque (rotational force) to the bolt. Now switch to a wrench that's three feet long, and apply ten pounds of force to the end of it, and you're applying thirty foot pounds of force to it. It's force multiplied by distance, and the result is expressed in foot pounds. An engine that is developing 500 foot pounds of torque is doing the equivalent of applying fifty pounds of force to the end of a ten foot long wrench. As stated before, and very correctly, horsepower is the rate at which torque is being developed. One horsepower is the amount of energy required to lift a 550 pound weight one foot vertically, and do it over a period of one second. CJ
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:48:18 PM EDT
Ugh not this again... WTF do you mean torque moves cars and horsepower doesn't? Guess what, if you had an engine with 300 ft-lbs of torque at 5 rpm, YOUR CAR AIN'T GOING ANYWHERE FAST!!! You can't say one car has "no torque" and another has "no horsepower". Look at the specs. More torque=more horsepower unless one engine makes that torque at an ungodly low RPM. In any case, higher horsepower will generally mean faster. Torque lower in the RPM range will make a vehicle (car or motorcycle) easier to drive around town without having to keep your engine at higher RPMs. By the way, once the torque hits the tires, the torque produced at the crankshaft is irrelavent, and will be similar between cars of similar horsepower ratings, even if their peak torque specs are quite different. And jap cars are slow because they make relatively little torque, AND horsepower. High revs make up for it a bit, but 100 hp IS NOT FAST.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:48:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2003 8:53:12 PM EDT by DanM]
http://www.g-speed.com/pbh/torque-and-hp.html DanM Edited to say link is dead tonite. But if it comes back, is a good primer.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:51:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:59:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By THellURider: Torque = Force * Perpendicular Distance Torque is real. It's what people buy. When you get pushed into your seat, thats torque. An AMG engineer was quoted as saying, "People buy horsepower, but they LIKE torque." Horsepower is actually a derivative of torque and actually it's the area underneath the torque curve if that means anything to you. Torque is a real force where as horsepower is something made up. I LOVE torque. [:D]
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Right. Torque is the real thing, horsepower is a term used to describe how efficient the engine is at producing it. In a drag car a high torque, low horse engine would pull the weight but be slow through the quarter mile. A high torque, high horse engine would pull the weight and be quick through the quarter.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:59:34 PM EDT
Think of it this way... Torque makes you go Horsepower makes you go [b]fast[/b] The trick is to find the compromise between the two that works best for your application.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:09:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DavidC: Think of it this way... Torque makes you go Horsepower makes you go [b]fast[/b] The trick is to find the compromise between the two that works best for your application.
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That is the truth right there! It's the cars that achieve that balance and have the right power/weight ratio that eat up people's cars in drag racing. Which is why that Dodge Charger with a large block Chevy engine that is souped up for power (and assuming you know how to handle it), will eat up most cars in a straight up drag race. What will be scary is when the Japanese take the American Muscle car blueprint, and make it high tech with only power and preformance in mind. Read:no souped up econobox-just RAW power.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:16:47 PM EDT
Which is why that Dodge Charger with a large block Chevy engine that is souped up for power (and assuming you know how to handle it), will eat up most cars in a straight up drag race.
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What the hell are you talking about??
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:17:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:20:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MillerSHO:
Originally Posted By DoomPatrol: Torque is the power the engine produces. Horspower is how fast the engine produces it.
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Ding ding ding. We have a winner. Throw in at what various engine speed (RPM) the engine puts out even given HP and Torque number and you can really know how truely powerful the engine is. Peak values are so misleading.
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No doubt. An engine may produce 400 peak hp but if it produces it 1000 rpm past the peak torque figure you may really only have say 360 usable hp. Again using the drag racing example it's better to shift gears closer to the peak torque figure than the peak hp figure. If you shift closer to the peak hp, speed is maintained but you'd experience a loss of acceleration because the torque curve is falling off.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:33:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2003 9:34:20 PM EDT by DavidC]
If you're interested in some real workld HP/Tq numbers, check out [url]http://www.supercharger.net/members/david/Dynochart.html[/url] That URL is some data on a supercharged 355 I built. You'll see a couple of interesting things; for example, the tq and HP curves cross at 5250 RPM (576 RWHP / 576 RWTq) whihc is what accurate data should do. As the chart indicates, this particular motor is already making well over 300 ft-lbs Tq at 2300 RPM. but with the baby cam it had (218/224 112) it still made peak power pretty low; 611 RWHP at 5800 RPM, at which point Tq had dropped down to the mid-500 ft-lb range. While the car wasn't set up for drag racing, 1/4 mile results followed as expected; it was a heavy car (4000 lbs with me driving) and it was slow off the line, but cam on very strong at the big end. NA cars will exibit very different HP/Tq ratios. When the test dta that the table was derived from was recorded the car was making about 12 PSIg boost from 5000 RPM on up.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:37:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2003 9:42:24 PM EDT by Q-Man]
From the physics book (With some of my own embellishments): Torque: A doorknob is located as far as possible from the door's hinge line for a good reason. If you want to open a heavy door you must certainly apply a force; that alone, however, is not enough. Where you apply that force and in what direction you push are also important. If you apply your force nearer to the hinge line than the knob, or at any angle other than 90 degrees to the plane of the door, you must use a greater force to move the door than if you apply the force at the knob and perpendicular to the door's plane...... The ability of a force (F) to rotate the body depends not only on the magnitude of its tangential component, but also on just how far from the rotation axis it is applied. Torque (T) is defined as follows: T = r * F * sin( phi ) Where r is the distance between the rotational axis and the point where the force is applied. F is the magnitude of the force. Phi (a Greek letter) is the angle between the direction of the force and the line from the axis to the point where the force is applied (The plane of the door in the earlier example). If the force is perpendicular: T = r * F Torque described as a vector is the cross product of the position vector (r) and the force vector (F). T = r X F Torque, which comes from the Latin word meaning "to twist," may be loosely identified as the turning or twisting action of the force F. When you apply a force to an object--such as a screwdriver or pipe wrench--with the purpose of turning that object, you are applying a torque. The SI unit of torque is the Newton-meter (N*m). (The Newton-meter is also the unit of work. Torque and work, however, are quite different quantities and must not be confused. Work is often expressed in joules -- 1 J = 1 N*m -- but torque never is.) The English unit for work is foot-pounds.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:37:41 PM EDT
Horse Power is a unit of power. 1 horse power equals 745.7 Watts. In Physics, this falls under the category of Power. You must first, however, learn about “work”. Work (W) is the amount of energy (joules or foot-pounds) exerted by force acting over a distance. When the force (F) is pushing in the same direction as the distance (d) work can be described as: W = F * d If I push a box across the floor for 1 meter and push on the box with 1 Newton of force, then 1 joule of energy has been exerted. Power (P) is the rate at which work is done by a force is said to be the power due to the force. If an amount of work (W) is done in an amount of time (t) by a force, the average power due to the force during that time interval is: P = W / t One Watt of power is one joule per second. In the English system, power is the foot-pound per second. 1 horse power is equal to 550 foot-pounds/second. If I push a box across the floor for 2 meters and push on the box with 1 Newton of force, then 2 joules of energy has been exerted. If it takes me 2 seconds to do this, then 1 Watt of power is used, or about 0.00134 horse power. The ability of a big diesel truck to pull a trailer out of the mud is due to the large amount of torque (rotational force) its engine can produce. Diesels usually have a pretty good amount of torque throughout their RPM range. (Horse)Power would be the ability of the truck to pull the trailer through the mud or up a hill quickly. In other words, a high horse power engine can produce a lot of energy in a little time. Think of your 10 speed bicycle. If you are going to go up a hill in the 10th gear, you will have a hard time because you will have to push really hard on the pedals (torque). Now say you want to go up the hill at 20 mph no matter what gear you are in—in other words, it takes you the same amount of time to get up the hill no matter what gear you are in. If you do this in 10th gear, you will push extremely hard on the pedals. If you do this in 1st gear, you will not push very hard on the pedals, but you will have to spin your feet like mad trying to go 20 mph. Discounting losses do to friction, etc., you spent the same amount of energy going up the hill in 1st gear as you did in 10th gear. You also spent the same amount of time spending this energy. Therefore you used the same amount of horse power in both instances. However, in one case you needed a lot of torque and in the other you needed very little. Regardless, you’re probably tired and should exercise more.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 9:41:47 PM EDT
Torque is rotational energy output... HP is a power (energy per second) rating... WRT car racing, the important question is how well the vehicle balances it's HP and torque production... High torque early on provides good towing capability, and good launch capability for drag racing. A classic example of this is found in most American V8 vehicles. High HP with lower torque (and higher RPMs, as each revolution is doing less actual work, the engine produces more of them) provides more top-end speed (ala rice-rocket)... Car #1 (high-torque) will generally beat car #2 in a quarter-mile, given the same peak HP. Car #2 will probably beat car #1 if you start from 65mph instead of a stop (since the torque advantage is that #1 will launch faster due to the higher initial energy output)...
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 10:03:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2003 10:29:43 PM EDT by Sewer_Urchin]
Thanks for all the replies. I remeber a lot of this stuff from high school physics from many years ago, but it fails me now. So here is what I gathered so far: torque = Force X Perpendicular Distance and HP = Energy exerted to lift 550lbs. vertically Hey TitaniumT, can you check that formula for me again. Hypothetically lets say that an engine produces 200 hp @ 4,500rpm. So the formula to figure torque at 4,500 RPM would look something like this: (t X 4,500)/5,252 = 200hp multiply both sides by 5,252 to get rid of the fraction and you get: (t X 4,500) = 1,050,400 divide 1,050,400 by 4,500 and you have 233.44 foot pounds of torque at 4,500 RPM right? THellURide: torque = force times perpendicular force. What and how is force measured? I remeber something about newton/meters which I assume is a metric conversion for ft/lbs. but isn't force measured in hp or jewels? From my understanding, if 1 hp = energy to lift 550lbs 1 ft. vertically, it is a finite force and needs a driving force behind it to maintain momentum. That force is torque? I don't know if I'me getting that. If you have a 1hp engine, it will continuously lift that weight vertically as long as it produces that 1hp. Is there a time value attatched to that 1hp like "amount of force required to lift 550lbs. vertically 1ft in 1 second or something like that? I'm still not getting it completely. I really liked physics, but went the route of business/marketing in college becase there is (sarcasm on)oh so much money in business and marketing (sarcasm off). (bitterness on)...... edited to say: Ah... I see. Thankyou QMan. That pretty much answers everything.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 10:17:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sewer_Urchin: Thanks for all the replies. I remeber a lot of this stuff from high school physics from many years ago, but it fails me now. So here is what I gathered so far: torque = Force X Perpendicular Distance and HP = Energy exerted to lift 550lbs. vertically Hey TitaniumT, can you check that formula for me again. Hypothetically lets say that an engine produces 200 hp @ 4,500rpm. So the formula to figure torque at 4,500 RPM would look something like this: (t X 4,500)/5,252 = 200hp multiply both sides by 5,252 to get rid of the fraction and you get: (t X 4,500) = 1,050,400 divide 1,050,400 by 4,500 and you have 233.44 foot pounds of torque at 4,500 RPM right? THellURide: torque = force times perpendicular force. What and how is force measured? I remeber something about newton/meters which I assume is a metric conversion for ft/lbs. but isn't force measured in hp or jewels? I really liked physics, but went the route of business/marketing in college becase there is (sarcasm on)oh so much money in business and marketing (sarcasm off). (bitterness on)......
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Joules, not jewels...
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 10:43:11 PM EDT
Hey Dave_A, at least I remembered what it sounded like. Joule/jewel whats the dif? [:p]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 5:58:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sewer_Urchin: Thanks for all the replies. I remeber a lot of this stuff from high school physics from many years ago, but it fails me now. So here is what I gathered so far: THellURide: torque = force times perpendicular [b][red]distance[/red][/b]. What and how is force measured? I remeber something about newton/meters which I assume is a metric conversion for ft/lbs. but isn't force measured in hp or jewels? From my understanding, if 1 hp = energy to lift 550lbs 1 ft. vertically, it is a finite force and needs a driving force behind it to maintain momentum. That force is torque? I don't know if I'me getting that. If you have a 1hp engine, it will continuously lift that weight vertically as long as it produces that 1hp. Is there a time value attatched to that 1hp like "amount of force required to lift 550lbs. vertically 1ft in 1 second or something like that? I'm still not getting it completely. I really liked physics, but went the route of business/marketing in college becase there is (sarcasm on)oh so much money in business and marketing (sarcasm off). (bitterness on)...... edited to say: Ah... I see. Thankyou QMan. That pretty much answers everything.
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Well I know Qman definetly gave you some stuff to chew on but. If Force = Mass * Acceleration Mass is measured in kg. And Acceleration in m/sec*sec. Therefore Force is (Kg*m)/(sec*sec) which is otherwise known as a Newton. A horsepower is not a force. Its a DERIVED number. The engine is producing torque which is actually what is doing the lifting in that case. Its important that you understand theat HP is not a "real" thing. Its the first derivative of torque which is the speed and also the area under neath the torque curve. Everyone here is right in that HP measure how "fast" it produces power but the fact is that torque is real, horsepower is not. Obviously you DO want a blend of both.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:32:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 6:46:44 AM EDT by SuperAlpha]
It is most thing important to remember is that numbers are always shown as PEAK! This is crap used to "sell" a car. Motors have a maximum speed which is where they no longer produce torque. This is easily shown on the torque-speed curve. Seeing the curve is most important because you can see the speed when the torque drops.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:36:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 6:47:04 AM EDT by SuperAlpha]
[size=3][b]THE AREA UNDER THE CURVE = INTEGRAL, [red]NOT DERIVATIVE[/red][/b] Horsepower = the INTEGRAL of the Torque-speed curve. [/size=3]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:53:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DoomPatrol: Torque is the [red]power[/red] the engine produces. Hors[red]power[/red] is how fast the engine produces it.
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Sorry, this kind of stuff drives physicists crazy: Horsepower is, by definition, [blue]power[/blue]! It's how much kinketic energy the engine can pump out per second. Torque is [blue]force[/blue] (times a lever arm).
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:58:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 7:07:58 AM EDT by Silence]
You can have a buncha HP but have crappy gearing and not be able to deliver torque. Same with top end speed, you can have ALOT of hp and torque, but if you dont have the gearing it is usually wasted. RPMs dont really mean much, if you are properly transmissioning (that a word?) the engine then you can take advantage of high rpms to deliver torque, same with lower rpms. So 'engine' measurements of 'HP' or 'Torque' are usless, you need 'power at the wheel' to have an idea what sorta performance the vehicle is capable of. Here is something I stole from this place: [url]http://www.seatcupra.net/guides.php?descrip=Power%20And%20Torque[/url]
But wait a minute. If Torque is all that matters, why is power always considered so important? Because (re-engage your memory banks again) “power dictates how much advantage you can make of gearing”……which is where it all gets a little bit complex…and folks start switching off…but come back…it’s not that difficult! I’ve seen a few analogies before, but the best one I’ve thought of now is YOU. Well, you on a bike actually – we can all relate to that (yeah?). Torque is what your legs generate. As stated above ~ If you press harder on the pedals you’ll accelerate harder…..simple! You use the gears on your bike to multiply the torque your legs generate. In 1st gear the bike wheel may only rotate once for every 5 times you spin the pedals. In this gear you can zip up a hill (or accelerate really quickly), ‘cos this gearing has the effect of multiplying your leg power by 5. If you maintain a steady force on the pedals, the bike accelerates at a steady rate. The torque you are generating stays constant, but the faster you spin your legs the more power you muster. Eventually you discover that you run out of “RPM” – your coordination goes, and you can’t really get any force into your leg strokes. This is like your engine going upto and beyond its’ peak power point. Higher gears allow you to move along quickly whilst your legs go round at a comfortable pace. Nice one. Try to pull away from a standstill in the same gear however and (without enormous multiplication of your leg strength) it’ll take you significantly longer to get up to speed. Lets invent two characters:-. Arnie and Splinter. These guys epitomise two extremes of engine genre. Arnie has whopping leg muscles…thighs thicker than Tara-Palmer-Tomkinson. He is however a little clumsy and uncoordinated, so whilst he can REALLY “pump dem pedals”, he can only manage slow rotations. Anything else is too much for his feeble mind and coordination. (whisper…he’s the turbodiesel). Splinter conversely has spindly “twiggy legs” - He can barely stand up from his seat when his cup of Horlicks is full to the brim. Splinter however has been surgically enhanced with “VAJ” (variable-ankle-jeometry) that endows him with an uncanny ability to “spin da cog”. Although he can only manage a feeble push, he can maintain the coordination needed to rotate the pedals at…oh god knows how many rpm…it’s so fast I can’t count. You’d really need to see this guy. (whisper again….he’s the VTEC) We line them up on the drag strip and Whooaa! Arnie storms into the lead, his rear tyre barely able to contain the thrust created by those burly legs. But…oh dear….his coordination is going, and he’s quickly forced to change up into second, then third…and look at this! Splinter is staging a comeback, still in first with his legs flailing like ….a flaily thing. Whilst Arnie is producing major leg thrust, he’s currently using 3rd gear, which only doubles the torque his legs generate before it reaches the rear wheel. Splinter is still in first, so his weedy leg strength continues to be subject to 5-times multiplication…and he’s reeling Arnie in! It’s a similar story when they are up to maximum speed. By enormous coincidence they appear to have an identical flat-out pace. Arnie is pumping his top gear firmly and steadily ~ wind resistance and friction conspire against him – he can go no faster. Splinter is right up there with him, but he’s still in 3rd - legs whizzing round. If we assume they have the same drag coefficient & weight etc, they are both producing the same POWER at this point. Arnie via high leg torque and low rpm, Splinter via low leg torque and high rpm. Their two power outputs are equal, and each calculation is valid. It’s exactly the same story when you look at the torque arriving at the rear wheel of the bike ~ Arnie is making high leg torque, but it’s being blunted by the high gearing he has to use. Splinter uses low gearing to maintain the multiplication of his leg muscles and provide an identical torque at the rear wheel.
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Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:08:15 AM EDT
For a seat of the pants answer, I always liked the statement that "Torque is what gives you the hard launch off the line and horsepower is what gives you the top speed." As I remember it on the street, torque is king, not horsepower.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:37:51 AM EDT
IMHO, torque gets you going and horsepower keeps you going.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:42:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SuperAlpha: [size=3][b]THE AREA UNDER THE CURVE = INTEGRAL, [red]NOT DERIVATIVE[/red][/b] Horsepower = the INTEGRAL of the Torque-speed curve. [/size=3]
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Thank you for the correction. You are correct. Too early in the morning.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 8:06:45 AM EDT
[:)]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 10:40:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TekChef:
Originally Posted By DavidC: Think of it this way... Torque makes you go Horsepower makes you go [b]fast[/b] The trick is to find the compromise between the two that works best for your application.
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That is the truth right there! It's the cars that achieve that balance and have the right power/weight ratio that eat up people's cars in drag racing. Which is why that Dodge Charger with a large block Chevy engine that is souped up for power (and assuming you know how to handle it), will eat up most cars in a straight up drag race. What will be scary is when the Japanese take the American Muscle car blueprint, and make it high tech with only power and preformance in mind. Read:no souped up econobox-just RAW power.
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What duh fvck you talkin' bout! A Dog Charger wit a big ol' Cheby engine will blow the doughs off of anythang. Imagine the same big block Chevy engine in lets say a Chevelle, Camaro or even a Corvette! Wow! Now we have a thoroughbred! [beer] I can't wait to see the Honda Accord with a LS-1.[ROFL]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 10:44:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Fly-Fly: I can't wait to see the Honda Accord with a LS-1.[ROFL]
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Will a sticker be sufficient?
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 10:46:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sewer_Urchin: torque = Force X Perpendicular Distance and HP = Energy exerted to lift 550lbs. vertically
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[i]in one second.[/i] Rotational might confuse you so just focus on linear mechanics. Say you had a sheave connected to your engine. It pulls a 550 pound weight one foot vertically in one second. That is one horsepower. Its equal to pulling a 55 pound weight 10 feet in one second. Or a 5.5 pound weight 100 feet in one second. Its all one horsepower. Now say the sheave is 2 feet in diameter. That is a one foot radius. You have a 550 pound weight and the engine pulls it vertically in one second. The engine is exerting a torque (regardless of RPM) of 550 ft*lb due to the radius of one foot and force of 550 pounds. The speed of the engine (assuming a direct drive) would be 1/6.2831854...(pi)revolution per second or 9.54 RPM. Slow to say the least.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 11:15:30 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 11:24:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:38:17 PM EDT
Yet another definition/explanation: Torque is what sustains an engine's RPM level against resistance. An engine with no load on it may spin 10,000 RPM at wide open throttle (and if it's a well made engine, may even survive it) and it doesn't have to have much torque to do that, but if it has to pull two tons of car around the track it at 200 miles an hour, it needs a great deal of torque to keep the engine at that RPM level. RPM is velocity. Torque is the force behind that velocity. Horsepower is the total power generated as a result of the combination of RPM and torque. You can have a bunch of very different engines that all generate the same level of horsepower, but have very different torque and RPM curves. CJ
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:44:07 PM EDT
This is the definition of Horsepower... 1200hp with the Nitrous turned on... [img]http://photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=13027[/img]
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 2:25:49 AM EDT
My uncle a mechanic and race car driver, now retired from both told me torque is what gets you from 0-60mph while horsepower is what holds you there.
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 2:40:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/21/2003 2:41:16 AM EDT by propguy]
Now see what you have done Mr. Urchin I hope your happy now [}:D]
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 6:38:13 AM EDT
would gear ratio have anything to do with torque? I have a 81 cyenne k-10,4 speed borge&warner 4.1 liter(250) Lots of torque,not so much horse-power! Lots of pull,can smoke the tires (accidently) Pull hell through a handbag,but I wouldn't call it fast! Bob [:D]
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 11:50:21 AM EDT
Propguy, I love this stuff. Physics kicks ass. I just wish that I had taken more classes in College rather than drinking/partying/manwhoring and all. Then I could be a genius like everyone else. Did I mention that AR15.com rocks? I swear I can just type any question about anything in the cosmos and within minutes have two pages of intelligent answers and about five smart ass replies. I love this site
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