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Posted: 8/15/2005 10:33:09 PM EDT
One of the most interesting photos I've ever seen hung in the dojo of one of my martial arts instructors. It was a old black and white photo enlarged to 8x10 of a Japanese junior officer walking out into a field with a drawn sword.

The story of the photo is even more impressive.

The officer in the photograph was the uncle of my instructor. My teacher was Amerasian and his American father married a Japanese girl after the war where he served in the occupational forces. My teacher lived in Japan until he was 17 with his father and mother at her family home in Kyoto. The Japanese officer was his mothers older brother who served in the Japanese army and the photo was taken at Okinawa. The family name was Taira and they were of Samurai ancestory.

His uncles last moments were related to the family by the radio operator, the only surviving member of that group of defenders on part of the Shuri line.

During the Battle of Okinawa in 1945 a Japanese defending force was attempting to impede the progress of US Marines who were making steady advances at great cost to the Japanese soldiers who faced them. The Japanese had not been resupplied and were short on food, ammunition and men. When ammunition ran critically low the bulk of the remaining men were killed in two futile Banzai charges against the US lines.

Heavy fire from the US lines gradually eliminated the handful of defenders who manned the Japanese line until only a junior officer and his radio operator remained, the radio operator having been rendered useless when the radio was destroyed. The officer fired his last round at the unseen Marines only a few hundred yards away.

He then turned to his radio operator and issued his last orders. First he forbade his radio officer the opportunity to commit suicide (this was a real possibility) as his primary duty was to escape and report their situation to their superiors. His next thought was of his appearance and he asked his radio officer if he looked "presentable" and he made a few adjustments to his uniform and noted the wear and dirt with some concern. His radio operator assured him that he looked "like an officer and was presentable as such." This greatly alleviated the junior officers worries.

He thanked his radio operator for his service, apologized for their present situation and with the statement that "my time has come" he drew a sword and climbed out of the trench and walked into the open field towards the US lines. The radio operator took a photo of him when he was only a few feet away. Shortly after he had walked a few yards into the field he was cut down by US fire.

The radio operator escaped and the photo was presented to the family in 1947.

It was a photo of a Japanese junior officer walking calmly to his death with his sword drawn and at his side.

Whenever I entered the dojo and saw that photo all the things that had troubled me all day long suddenly seemed insignificant and went away.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:36:41 PM EDT
Well at least he died thinking he still had some dignity
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:38:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 10:38:45 PM EDT by FLAL1A]
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:48:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 10:56:05 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.



Well he had never been to Nanking or Bataan so I kinda doubt it. His deployment to Okinawa was the first time he had left Japan and there weren't too many opportunities to commit "war crimes" in Kyoto.

Also his father was generally appalled at the goings on of "pretend Samurai" who cut the heads off of women and children to prove their courage and skill. As a result he had a generally low opinion of the militarists who believed themselves to be "modern Samurai" and that is probably why he remained a "junior" officer despite having a name like "Taira." In this case that is like going to West Point with the name MacArthur because he was your grandfather.

As for being motivated by fear of repercussion, it is possible. But he might have been able to safely surrender if he was worried about saving his skin. I'm sure the Marines would have loved to have a captured officer to show for their efforts.

As for respecting an enemy with a noted track record of brutality? I understand that was quite a few of them. I also understand it wasn't all of them.

The fact that my teachers father was allowed to marry into their family also says quite a bit about them and their values.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:58:42 PM EDT
Thats a pretty good story.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:58:43 PM EDT
Very Interesting Read Steyr, like always.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:59:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Well he had never been to Nanking or Bataan so I kinda doubt it. His deployment to Okinawa was the first time he had left Japan and there weren't too many opportunities to commit "war crimes" in Kyoto.



It's not like there weren't horrendous attrocities committed on Okinawa. Matter of fact, it ranks right up there with Nanking for brutality against indigenous peoples by the Japanese.

No Japanese officer, who would still wear a uniform after Nanking, deserves any sympathy or respect, IMHO. If the US had done that, as an official policy of war, I would have taken a bullet before remaining in service to my country. No way I'd fight for a country that treats women and children like pigs and objects to be raped then murdered.

I have no dreamy-eyed visions of Japanese bravery. Bravery is doing what is right, no matter the cost or danger. Doing what is crazy, because you've been brainwashed by tyrants, is a whole different thing.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:01:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By OFFascist:
Thats a pretty good story.



I think so, it stuck with me for 20 years.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:05:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 11:07:09 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Well he had never been to Nanking or Bataan so I kinda doubt it. His deployment to Okinawa was the first time he had left Japan and there weren't too many opportunities to commit "war crimes" in Kyoto.



It's not like there weren't horrendous attrocities committed on Okinawa. Matter of fact, it ranks right up there with Nanking for brutality against indigenous peoples by the Japanese.

No Japanese officer, who would still wear a uniform after Nanking, deserves any sympathy or respect, IMHO. If the US had done that, as an official policy of war, I would have taken a bullet before remaining in service to my country. No way I'd fight for a country that treats women and children like pigs and objects to be raped then murdered.

I have no dreamy-eyed visions of Japanese bravery. Bravery is doing what is right, no matter the cost or danger. Doing what is crazy, because you've been brainwashed by tyrants, is a whole different thing.



One of the reasons things like Nanking happen in the first place is because people are able to judge an entire group, race or nation as "all alike."
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:09:06 PM EDT
Wow, I think my balls may have shrunk when I read that. To do that is utterly amazing...wow
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:25:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.

+1
The Japanese were universally brutal to any and all POW's, and civilian inhabitants of conquered territories. The Japanese army should have been declared a criminal organization, the same as the Waffen SS was in Nuremburg.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:33:29 PM EDT
I think it was a good story honestly.

-Storm
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:35:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Stormrider:
I think it was a good story honestly.

-Storm


+1
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:39:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

One of the reasons things like Nanking happen in the first place is because people are able to judge an entire group, race or nation as "all alike."



It's a bit of a stretch to equate judging "all Chinese" with judging "all officers of the Japanese Army from 1937 to 1945," given that being Chinese is an accident of birth while being a Japanese officer in that time period is a matter of being inducted into and indoctrinated by an organization which by its nature inculcated specific norms of behavior and attitude.

The reason that Nanking happened is that Japanese culture, and particularly the Japanese army, were characterized by gross racism and xenophobia, regarding non-Japanese people as presumtively subhuman.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 11:50:52 PM EDT
+1 on the story.......despite what others say, it is an honorable act to be admired knowing his outcome in life.

I truly doubt, including myself, and many other armchair commando's would do such a thing.

Sitting in the comfort of one's home, thousands of miles from any danger......and more likely to die from a massive blood clot and stroke from eating all those fatty foods, and lack of exercise, its easy to knock the deeds of a man, who paid with his life.

It reminds me of Gen. Swartzkoft (?), at an interview he talked about the Iraqi surrender at GWI, and an Iraqi general asked why he had a portrait of Irwin Rommel hanging in his quarters of his enemy. And Gen Swartzkopf responded that while he didn't support what nation he was fighting for, but he respected him for the military commander he was.

.....IMHO
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:06:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

One of the reasons things like Nanking happen in the first place is because people are able to judge an entire group, race or nation as "all alike."



It's a bit of a stretch to equate judging "all Chinese" with judging "all officers of the Japanese Army from 1937 to 1945," given that being Chinese is an accident of birth while being a Japanese officer in that time period is a matter of being inducted into and indoctrinated by an organization which by its nature inculcated specific norms of behavior and attitude.

The reason that Nanking happened is that Japanese culture, and particularly the Japanese army, were characterized by gross racism and xenophobia, regarding non-Japanese people as presumtively subhuman.



Couldn't have said it better myself.

I don't hate Japanese, or characterize any culture by its worst acts - but the Japanese military was willful and deliberate in their treatment of non-Japanese, and it was taught from the highest echelons of command down to the lowest foot soldier.

All Japanese officers, just like SS officers, had knowledge of their mission and of their tactics from the earliest campaigns to the end of the war, and are complicit in the crimes committed during their service. I don't respect their sacrifice, because I don't respect someone who justifies rape/murder/torture of non-combatants as legitimate tools of war.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:09:19 AM EDT
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:16:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 12:20:20 AM EDT by MonkTx]

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects



The only thing I like about them is that so many of them died. There is nothing to admire about a horde of barbaric savages and their perverted ideologies. That is akin to saying you really have to admire the Einsatzgruppen, "they sure did their duty with style".
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:18:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MonkTx:

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects



The only thing I like about them is that so many of them died. There is nothing to admire about a horde of barbaric savages and their perverted ideologies.




Spoken like a true idiot
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:21:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By MonkTx:

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects



The only thing I like about them is that so many of them died. There is nothing to admire about a horde of barbaric savages and their perverted ideologies.




Spoken like a true idiot



back atcha, moron.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:21:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MonkTx:

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects



The only thing I like about them is that so many of them died. There is nothing to admire about a horde of barbaric savages and their perverted ideologies.




the way that you feel toward the Japs is the way I feel toward the islamosandmonkeycameljockyfacists, however I don't think that there could ever be enough dead of those.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:22:38 AM EDT
I have a Type 99 that may have been captured on Okinawa by the 7th infantry division. It has the US soldier's initials and serial number carved into it and the emblem of the 7th. I did a search on the guy's serial and he didn't get drafted until January 1945, so he would have been with them on Okinawa. I'll post a pic later if anyone is interested.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:25:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 12:25:37 AM EDT by MonkTx]
Originally Posted By jmzd4:



the way that you feel toward the Japs is the way I feel toward the islamosandmonkeycameljockyfacists, however I don't think that there could ever be enough dead of those. "

I don't have ill feelings towards most Japanese, but the Japanese military of WW2 is a totally different story.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 1:02:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MonkTx:
Originally Posted By jmzd4:



the way that you feel toward the Japs is the way I feel toward the islamosandmonkeycameljockyfacists, however I don't think that there could ever be enough dead of those. "

I don't have ill feelings towards most Japanese, but the Japanese military of WW2 is a totally different story.



that's not the way it sounded.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 1:21:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 1:22:29 AM EDT by Enigma102083]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.



Well he had never been to Nanking or Bataan so I kinda doubt it. His deployment to Okinawa was the first time he had left Japan and there weren't too many opportunities to commit "war crimes" in Kyoto.

Also his father was generally appalled at the goings on of "pretend Samurai" who cut the heads off of women and children to prove their courage and skill. As a result he had a generally low opinion of the militarists who believed themselves to be "modern Samurai" and that is probably why he remained a "junior" officer despite having a name like "Taira." In this case that is like going to West Point with the name MacArthur because he was your grandfather.

As for being motivated by fear of repercussion, it is possible. But he might have been able to safely surrender if he was worried about saving his skin. I'm sure the Marines would have loved to have a captured officer to show for their efforts.

As for respecting an enemy with a noted track record of brutality? I understand that was quite a few of them. I also understand it wasn't all of them.

The fact that my teachers father was allowed to marry into their family also says quite a bit about them and their values.



If your teachers father was allowed to marry into the Taira family, as a one time practitioner of the Jundokan school of Hoju-Ryu Karate-Do, you have my respect. That final act is in true spirit and tradition of the Taira family.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 1:33:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jmzd4:

Originally Posted By MonkTx:
Originally Posted By jmzd4:



the way that you feel toward the Japs is the way I feel toward the islamosandmonkeycameljockyfacists, however I don't think that there could ever be enough dead of those. "

I don't have ill feelings towards most Japanese, but the Japanese military of WW2 is a totally different story.



that's not the way it sounded.



That's the way it sounded to me. I think he and I are saying the same things.....the Japanese people are not the Japanese army of a given time period. However, those particular soldiers, fighting for a sick and corrupt military structure bent on power and a vicious ideology, deserved the humiliating defeat and tragic end they suffered.

I guess you can masturbate to Ninja movies and paint the WWII soldiers as some kind of Bushido soldiers of honor, but I would rather admire OUR soldiers - and I prefer to make heroes of the men who put the Japanese murderers in the ground, because they are REAL men of honor. They fought for what was right, which is what honor is REALLY about, not dying for a shitty cause.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 1:44:45 AM EDT
alot of ignorance in this thread....
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:25:17 AM EDT
Please tell me you are going to post this picture . Preaty please ?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:35:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:40:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 2:41:17 AM EDT by hughjafj]
That's because the Japanese see death in an entirely different way than we do. Human life is not as important to them as it is to us. Honor comes before all else.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:48:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 2:48:45 AM EDT by metroplex]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.



Well he had never been to Nanking or Bataan so I kinda doubt it. His deployment to Okinawa was the first time he had left Japan and there weren't too many opportunities to commit "war crimes" in Kyoto.

Also his father was generally appalled at the goings on of "pretend Samurai" who cut the heads off of women and children to prove their courage and skill. As a result he had a generally low opinion of the militarists who believed themselves to be "modern Samurai" and that is probably why he remained a "junior" officer despite having a name like "Taira." In this case that is like going to West Point with the name MacArthur because he was your grandfather.

As for being motivated by fear of repercussion, it is possible. But he might have been able to safely surrender if he was worried about saving his skin. I'm sure the Marines would have loved to have a captured officer to show for their efforts.

As for respecting an enemy with a noted track record of brutality? I understand that was quite a few of them. I also understand it wasn't all of them.

The fact that my teachers father was allowed to marry into their family also says quite a bit about them and their values.



Don't forget the atrocities committed by the Japanese against non-US allied forces during WWII. People seem to overlook that fact. The Japanese will never look upon non-Japanese with any genuine respect. They can play the game quite well. This superiority complex is present to THIS DAY in the younger generations of Japanese.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:50:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Enigma102083:
alot of ignorance in this thread....



Yeah, but not about Japanese brutality during WWII.



Yup, lots of honor in Japan's army. Lots.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 2:58:43 AM EDT
I guess I should have said their honor, not just honor. God knows they were not exactly honorable as we understand it.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 3:13:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:

Originally Posted By MonkTx:

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I sure would like to see that photo.


A man with balls of steel and armed with the code of Bushido.

you really have to admire the Japanese in some aspects



The only thing I like about them is that so many of them died. There is nothing to admire about a horde of barbaric savages and their perverted ideologies.




Spoken like a true idiot



No, it is the truth. Had this noble officer killed himself rather than be numbered with the most savage army of the 20th century he would have my respect. I find nothing noble or romantic about dieing for cause devoid of any true honor.

Sorry for being contrary, but Steyr knew this might result from posting such a topic. If the Atom bombs had not been ready on schedule, how many members of this board would never have been born due to the casualties of the invasion of Japan?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:41:03 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:56:31 AM EDT
In all wars there are honorable warriors on both sides. That said, the actions of the Japanese toward their captives (civilian and military) does much to discredit their own perception of them fighting like Samurai, or those living under the Code of Bushido. They were animals who made the Nazi's look like pikers.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:59:02 AM EDT
A futile act of dedication to an ignoble cause.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:02:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zardoz:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
There's a better than fair chance that he was motivated as much by a desire to avoid dancing on a war criminal's gibbet as by a sense of honor. I hold little admiration for an officer in an army characterized as much by rape, murder, torture, and kidnaping as by martial gallantry.

+1
The Japanese were universally brutal to any and all POW's, and civilian inhabitants of conquered territories. The Japanese army should have been declared a criminal organization, the same as the Waffen SS was in Nuremburg.



It's unfortunate that the few get painted with the same brush the more criminal elements of their organization get painted with. I'm not defending the Japanese army of WWII by any stretch of the imagination, but, by your definition, the US Cavalry of the late 1800s was also a criminal organization.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:07:28 AM EDT
Love or hate the Japanese for what they did in WW II (and I hate them), you still have to admire them for their courage.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:14:37 AM EDT
Wow -good thing the entire American army isnt tied to the shame and guilt of the incident at My Lai.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:15:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 4v50:
Love or hate the Japanese for what they did in WW II (and I hate them), you still have to admire them for their courage.


Not much courage required to operate Unit 731.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:23:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 5:28:09 AM EDT by vanilla_gorilla]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:



As for being motivated by fear of repercussion, it is possible. But he might have been able to safely surrender if he was worried about saving his skin. I'm sure the Marines would have loved to have a captured officer to show for their efforts.




Soldiers were told over and over, had it drilled into them that Americans would dishonor them in every way possible. This convinced many that death was indeed a much better option.

Note that even this officer does not allow the enlisted man to go with him, nor commit hara-kiri. Enlisted men of the time were considered not worthy of the honor of committing suicide. Enlisted men, in the eyes of Japanese command and officers, were of no use except to take land in battle and then take a bullet.


Edit: BTW, Steyr, since this taken off, let me thank you for posting the story. Still a good read and inspiring of discussion. Well done.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:29:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PinPointOne:
Wow -good thing the entire American army isnt tied to the shame and guilt of the incident at My Lai.



Yes, it is a good thing, because My Lai was an anomaly rather than a reflection of officially accepted attitudes within the US Army. Nanking, the Burma Railway atrocities, Comfort Women, Bataan, sliced-off noses, routine starvation and execution of POWs were all aspects of normal operations of the Japanese army.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:31:43 AM EDT
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:36:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OFFascist:
Thats a pretty good story.



+1
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:37:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ElCamino:
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?



Because there are some here who belive the Japanese way shows honor, while the Germany of WWII is nearly universally reviled.

The discussion becomes heated discussion, then argument, then the hate spills forth.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:39:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 5:39:52 AM EDT by ElCamino]

Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:

Originally Posted By ElCamino:
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?



Because there are some here who belive the Japanese way shows honor, while the Germany of WWII is nearly universally reviled.

The discussion becomes heated discussion, then argument, then the hate spills forth.



Yet I see no concentration camp pictures in this thread. I imagine I'd be coming up close on an account lock if I were to post some.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:40:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 5:42:15 AM EDT by Da_Bunny]

Originally Posted By ElCamino:
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?



No Samuri swords? Why don't you just call everybody a racist so the battle can really begin?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:45:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
One of the reasons things like Nanking happen in the first place is because people are able to judge an entire group, race or nation as "all alike."




Remember this on your next ROP rant.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:46:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 5:50:56 AM EDT by FLAL1A]

Originally Posted By ElCamino:
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?



Probably because, other than the usual 88s who are ignored, nobody talks much about the nobility of German soldiers. The depravity of the Nazis' racial policies and death camps is (again, other than by the 88s) universally acknowledged. Nobody seems to have a pseudoreligious attachment to some antecedent code of German militarism which is treated as though it were pure, noble, and unrelated to the wickedness of the Nazi regime. The Germans are not generally believed to have been involved in routine criminal maltreatment of POWs.

It's not particularly vitriolic to point out that admiring reflections on the character of a member of the WWII Japanese army make about as much sense as reflecting on the generosity and good manners of a child molester. If somebody posted a rumination on the admirable efficiency with which Joseph Mengele ran his clinic, you'd probably see similar comments.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:56:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By ElCamino:
And you know what's really funny?

Threads that talk about the Germans never contain this sort of vitriol. Why is that?



Probably because, other than the usual 88s who are ignored, nobody talks much about the nobility of German soldiers. The depravity of the Nazis' racial policies and death camps is (again, other than by the 88s) universally acknowledged. Nobody seems to have a pseudoreligious attachment to some antecedent code of German militarism which is treated as though it were pure, noble, and unrelated to the wickedness of the Nazi regime. The Germans are not generally believed to have been involved in routine criminal maltreatment of POWs.

It's not particularly vitriolic to point out that admiring reflections on the character of a member of the WWII Japanese army make about as much sense as reflecting on the generosity and good manners of a child molester. If somebody posted a rumination on the admirable efficiency with which Joseph Mengele ran his clinic, you'd probably see similar comments.



I meant what he said, but it's too early in the mornign to type all those words.
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