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Posted: 7/23/2013 8:58:40 PM EST
I have never heard of this before.

Did an Archive search back to 2005 too.
If anyone has any larger images please share.







http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATLAS-I

http://www.ece.unm.edu/summa/notes/trestle.html

http://www.ece.unm.edu/summa/notes/trestle_movie.html
Movie about the Atlas-1 Trestle

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:04:46 PM EST
I would have been scared shitless having to tow a BUFF on to that thing
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:05:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Beamy:
I would have been scared shitless having to tow a BUFF on to that thing
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Look for the picture of the C-135.
They kind of missed the centerline of the taxiway.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:09:36 PM EST
Gotta say, i always get a kick out this when i drive by it, even if it isn't being used any more.

Then again, there are so many cool things on the base, i never get bored.. ;)
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:10:55 PM EST
Still standing.


Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:12:41 PM EST
That's pretty damned impressive!

I wonder if they set a Tundra on fire and used it as the tow. 'Cause a Tundra could do that.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:29:17 PM EST
No way OP, you are all things avionics/aviation related!

Even my dumbass knew about this thing!

Seriously cool structure though, thanks for posting.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:38:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:00:07 AM EST
i was fortunate to be given a full tour of the facility back when it was still operational.

it's an amazing structure in person.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:03:35 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:06:32 AM EST
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Originally Posted By leatherface_y2k:
That's pretty damned impressive!

I wonder if they set a Tundra on fire and used it as the tow. 'Cause a Tundra could do that.
View Quote


I love ARFCOM!!!!
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:12:00 AM EST
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:47:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2013 9:47:29 AM EST by KA3B]
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Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.
View Quote


Impressive.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:50:25 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:55:02 AM EST
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Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.
View Quote


The glue is stronger than the wood that it is bonding.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:59:23 AM EST
My first job after getting my Bachelor's degree was to analyze data from those tests and understand how to harden B-52 avionics against EMP.

It was on the cover of Aviation Week & Space Technology probably in 1980.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:04:09 AM EST
I'm pretty sure that I couldn't legally tow onto that as my tech data requires wing walkers unless it's a properly marked taxiway or ramp.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:05:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Z_0:
My first job after getting my Bachelor's degree was to analyze data from those tests and understand how to harden B-52 avionics against EMP.

It was on the cover of Aviation Week & Space Technology probably in 1980.
View Quote




I'm curious what general avionics areas required a lot of work to harden, and which if any, were already capable, if you can share.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:08:27 AM EST
So, how can we rent it to test out our Cars, Eotechs, Aimpoints and Airplanes, to settle the controversy once and for all.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:09:34 AM EST
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Originally Posted By KA3B:


Look for the picture of the C-135.
They kind of missed the centerline of the taxiway.
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Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By Beamy:
I would have been scared shitless having to tow a BUFF on to that thing


Look for the picture of the C-135.
They kind of missed the centerline of the taxiway.


Marines would have landed on it.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:13:09 AM EST
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Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.
View Quote

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:13:41 AM EST
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Originally Posted By jchewie1:




I'm curious what general avionics areas required a lot of work to harden, and which if any, were already capable, if you can share.
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Originally Posted By jchewie1:
Originally Posted By Z_0:
My first job after getting my Bachelor's degree was to analyze data from those tests and understand how to harden B-52 avionics against EMP.

It was on the cover of Aviation Week & Space Technology probably in 1980.




I'm curious what general avionics areas required a lot of work to harden, and which if any, were already capable, if you can share.


The technology was so old that most components (vacum tubes, servos, synchros, etc.) were not very sensitive to EMP. Boxes connected to long cable runs needed protection using transorbs. The data was useful for designing new avionics that used more modern technology.

That was so long ago that I don't remember too much detail. I haven't worked on EMP hardening since late 1980.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:14:37 AM EST
Creosote soaked wood drying in the desert sun since 1980?

Nobody light a match.

We'd see the light from here.

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:14:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.


I read that the cheapest and most efficent way to dispose of the facility was to burn it in place.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:18:33 AM EST
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Originally Posted By KA3B:
I read that the cheapest and most efficent way to dispose of the facility was to burn it in place.
View Quote

Certainly the fastest.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:18:49 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.


Unless the wood bolts are actually threaded, they are more properly referred to as "pins". Pinning a mortise and tenon joint makes the joint damn near indestructible, at least as far as wood joinery is concerned. It's a really, really old technique that most likely originated with chair making.

These kind of massive wood structures fascinate me, and even more so when they're used for high-tech research such as this.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:23:31 AM EST
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Originally Posted By USPcompact:


Unless the wood bolts are actually threaded, they are more properly referred to as "pins". Pinning a mortise and tenon joint makes the joint damn near indestructible, at least as far as wood joinery is concerned. It's a really, really old technique that most likely originated with chair making.

These kind of massive wood structures fascinate me, and even more so when they're used for high-tech research such as this.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.


Unless the wood bolts are actually threaded, they are more properly referred to as "pins". Pinning a mortise and tenon joint makes the joint damn near indestructible, at least as far as wood joinery is concerned. It's a really, really old technique that most likely originated with chair making.

These kind of massive wood structures fascinate me, and even more so when they're used for high-tech research such as this.

They are threaded.

They're fastened into square wood nuts (with additional locking nuts) over plate reinforcements. All of the fastening pieces were furniture grade hardwood.

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:24:23 AM EST
Mark A. Miller, a professional engineer who worked on the project said "I designed most of the wooden structure as a junior engineer at Krause Engineering in Santa Fe.
We were working for the architect in Albuquerque; the prime contractor was McDonald-Douglas.
I spent most of the first two years of my career working on it.
The resin-impregnated wooden bolts were . . . furniture quality items.
We could use no piece of metal longer than 12” , and the columns were 12” x 12” with 6” pieces bolted on both sides, so the minimum bolt grip was 24”, which pretty much precluded metal bolts . . . "

McDonnell Douglas, was AeroE involved?

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:32:32 AM EST
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Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:

They are threaded.

They're fastened into square wood nuts (with additional locking nuts) over plate reinforcements. All of the fastening pieces were furniture grade hardwood.

http://www.ece.unm.edu/summa/notes/trestlepics/trestle6L.jpg
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Originally Posted By snakes19:
holy crap the platform is made entirely of wood and it is glued together.

It's made of glu-lam (engineered) wood, but the structural connections are largely notched or mortised joints. In some areas there are actual wood bolts holding members together.

When I was working in the CE squadron there we were trying to get permission to dispose of it. Glad to see that effort is moving at the speed of government.


Unless the wood bolts are actually threaded, they are more properly referred to as "pins". Pinning a mortise and tenon joint makes the joint damn near indestructible, at least as far as wood joinery is concerned. It's a really, really old technique that most likely originated with chair making.

These kind of massive wood structures fascinate me, and even more so when they're used for high-tech research such as this.

They are threaded.

They're fastened into square wood nuts (with additional locking nuts) over plate reinforcements. All of the fastening pieces were furniture grade hardwood.

http://www.ece.unm.edu/summa/notes/trestlepics/trestle6L.jpg




Holy shit! That's fucking awesome!


Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:33:07 AM EST
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Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:

Certainly the fastest.
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Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
I read that the cheapest and most efficent way to dispose of the facility was to burn it in place.

Certainly the fastest.

We would have had to contract it out, so it wouldn't have been cheap. Also, the NM EPA is kinda stupid so permission would've been iffy (and even then they probably would've tried to fine us), and the state is nearly always under some kind of burn ban. Right now residents in Albuquerque can't even use charcoal grills.

We never did scope a method of disposal, since we were still trying to get approval from OACSIM. We never got any maintenance dollars for it, but people still wanted to use it. One of my last little projects there was to provide drinking fountains in the offices for Big Crow. It's a cash-sink for the installation.

I'd be all for preserving it, but only if a private historic society wanted to take it up (heck, I might even donate to that) and maintain it. It's just not cost effective to keep it in the DoD inventory.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 11:34:11 AM EST
Put out a sign that reads:

Contrachapada Gratis!

Area will be bare in less than a week.

You are welcome.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 11:35:04 AM EST
I drive by it every day to and from work...
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 11:37:45 AM EST
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Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Also, the NM EPA is kinda stupid so permission would've been iffy (and even then they probably would've tried to fine us), and the state is nearly always under some kind of burn ban.
View Quote


Its the federal government's property.

The NM EPA can eat a bag of dicks.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 11:39:25 AM EST
I'm sure my Grandpa helped. He worked for Sandia labs for 35 yrs. Now my aunt works there.

Pretty cool.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:13:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Beamy:
I would have been scared shitless having to tow a BUFF on to that thing
View Quote


Why? They used conduction techniques the railroads used to build wooden trestles that carry trains weighing many times the weight of a B-52 without any problems. The wing overhang I can understand, but there are photos I've seen of 747s and C-5s out on that platform to be tested.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:21:43 PM EST
Very interesting. Never heard of this before.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:25:48 PM EST
So just skimming, I don't see any mention of actual results?
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:41:55 PM EST
Huh! I've 4-wheeled, ATV'd, drag raced, taken shit to the dump, caused trouble, and gotten laid all within a stones throw of that thing....and had no clue
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:19:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By oatlord:
So just skimming, I don't see any mention of actual results?
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It was and probably still is, classified.

Practically everything that happens there is Top Secret. It'a like Area 51, but more secret since no one really knows about it.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:21:23 PM EST
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Originally Posted By badfish274:


Its the federal government's property.

The NM EPA can eat a bag of dicks.
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Originally Posted By badfish274:
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Also, the NM EPA is kinda stupid so permission would've been iffy (and even then they probably would've tried to fine us), and the state is nearly always under some kind of burn ban.


Its the federal government's property.

The NM EPA can eat a bag of dicks.

No.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:22:58 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hushpuppy:
Creosote soaked wood drying in the desert sun since 1980?

Nobody light a match.

We'd see the light from here.

View Quote

It could get hit with a tracer...
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:27:38 PM EST
An F-16A with simulated B61 was EMP tested at that facility in 1980.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:30:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2013 5:31:35 PM EST by limaxray]
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:

No.
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By badfish274:
Originally Posted By DrFeelgood:
Also, the NM EPA is kinda stupid so permission would've been iffy (and even then they probably would've tried to fine us), and the state is nearly always under some kind of burn ban.


Its the federal government's property.

The NM EPA can eat a bag of dicks.

No.


Wishful thinking but oh, GOD no.

I've been in the room when the lawyers advised the wing commander that he had no choice but to follow both state and federal code, when they DIRECTLY contradicted each other. (Wing King basically told his finance guy to get the checkbook ready to pay off the fines to the state. Which we did, after much crying about the disruption to the triple-beaked whooperwhill's mating dance, or some such nonsense.)
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