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Posted: 8/26/2015 3:21:33 PM EDT
I started a thread about crappy parents.  My mom was a prime example.

But then there was my dad.

I was but 6-7 and we were not well off. Living check to check.

It was Christmas and we got one big toy and some other smaller things.

I got a train set which was cool but not that exciting.

The kid next door got this super duper two car electric race kits.

All the neighborhood kids were there amazed by it.

Now this kids was an arse and bully.   And he told me I was not to play with it ever.

So I went home disappointed and told my dad.  I did not ask him for one or anything.  But I could see in his eyes I lit something in him.

He told me to get my coat on and took me Sears of all places and he bought me a set.

Another time I came home from college and had no money at all to speak of.  He asked if I had money and I said no. He reached into his pocket and gave me a few bills.

Later I realized that was all his money for the rest of the month.

I miss my dad.  

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:32:52 PM EDT
I would but I don't think I could finish the post.

In to hear other stories.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:36:15 PM EDT
My parents were always there for me, always willing and able to help me with what ever problem I had, and/or have.  My Father taught me everything important in life, how to be a Dad, a Husband, a best friend. My Mother taught me the value of family, a clean house, and what a good woman brings to your life.  They were always at everything important in my childhood.  Coaches, scout leaders, etc.

My Father employs me, and is teaching me how to run his business that I will one day pass to my sons.  My mother babysits so my wife and I can both work and provide the lifestyle to our sons that we both had as children.

Simply put my parents are more than heroes to me, they are the best people I have ever or will ever know, and I hope that I can be the man they raised me to be and that they will always be proud of me and the job the did raising me.

The only acceptable way to thank them for my life is to make damn sure that I pass their efforts on to my children, which I damn well will.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:37:25 PM EDT
Normal Rockwell painting of a family. That was mine.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:38:35 PM EDT
One year we got a crapload of ice in Mississippi.  My brother was in Junior High and I was still in Elementary School.  Roads were horrible, so school was out.
My father went out to his shop that morning and you could hear him hammering away.  He came out later with a home made sled that had flattened pipes for rails.

We had more fun on that sled!

My dad could fix about anything.  I went to a friends house for a party one night and (admittedly) had too much to drink.  I ended up staying late the next day and my best friend and I were supposed to drive home.
We got to a stop sign and every time I pushed the clutch, the car would die and we'd coast.  It did this over and over again.  We finally went dead at a parking lot and I walked to a pay phone and called my dad to come and get us.

My dad ended up fixing what was wrong with the car using a rubber band and a match stick in a Fred's parking lot.  I recall my best friend watching and then saying, "Your dad is like MacGyver!"
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:43:32 PM EDT
Dad knew what he wanted.  He started dating Mom & popped the question.  She had to cancel other dates.  
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:43:56 PM EDT
My Dad was a real MacGyver, genius extraordinaire at fixing stuff and improvising.  Mom was known to carry (and fuck no she did not have a CCW, she had the God given right of the 2nd Amendment).

I miss them both, RIP,
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:46:28 PM EDT
My dad is 50 years old, and he is the only person that has been 100% reliable while I worked at starting my business.

Every single time I called him (and still to this day) and said "I have concrete coming at 6am and no one to help me tomorrow" his only reply has always been "Where do you want me to meet you".

I pay him every time, but I couldn't pay him enough to ever make up for always being there to bail me out.

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:46:29 PM EDT
They got together and had me!!  Nothing better than that from my point of view.




EBR666
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:47:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:50:18 PM EDT
I would love to tell you guys stories about my mom...She was so awesome that it would take me all day to write about her...But since I have been in such a "blue mood" for these last couple of days, I think I will just read everyone elses..

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 3:56:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 3:57:59 PM EDT by RogerBall]
My parents loved each other very much and had a slew of kids to prove it. They had me kind of late in life.  It didn't stop my dad from coaching my Little league team, however.  That man knew a thing or two.
He is my role model in everything i do; when i am faced with a conundrum i think, "what would dad do?".
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:15:45 PM EDT
My parents are great people.  They worked hard and sacrificed a lot for my siblings and I.  They gave up everything in Korea to come to America so kids could have better opportunity for good life.

My father and I didn't get close until I got married and then I understood him a lot better.  He's in his 80's now and has some minor health issues but he's still very active and keeps busy.  Recently he was in the hospital for few days when he had some medical issues and I would go visit him every morning before work and after work on the way home.  I would walk him around the hall to keep prevent  circulation problems and I realized we were holding hands while walking just like he used to hold my hands while walking across street when I was little...brought tears to my eyes.  

My mother is a fire cracker with sharp wit and very good sense of humor.  One time while at my parents house my wife saw a picture of me when I was about 9 y/o. My wife turned to my mom and commented that I was such a cute child to which my mom said "yeah, he was cute when little but started to get ugly when he started eating American fast food".   When my parents got married and people asked what my father does for a living she used to reply that he was an Animal Pimp.  My father was a veterinarian specializing in genetics (selective breeding) of large farm animals but that was too difficult to explain to people so she told them he was a Animal Pimp and everybody understood what that was.

They live about 3 miles away so almost every Saturday night my siblings and I and out families get together at my parents house for dinner, dissert and coffee.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:17:18 PM EDT
The one that I remember the most...



My mom is mostly quiet, non-confrontational. She also doesn't like guns, she didn't mind that dad had them in the house, she just didn't touch them or shoot them. Dad worked rotating shifts and one particular evening he was at work. A co-worker of his came to the house drunk off his ass. He knocked on the door and asked to talk to dad. Mom told the guy that dad was at work come back tomorrow. (Mom also hates being around drunks).



Guy bangs on the door demanding to see dad. Mom didn't open the door this time, instead she yelled that dad was gone come back tomorrow when he is here and you are sober. The guy started banging on the door again wanting to talk to dad. This time mom left the front room and then came back with dad's revolver. Dad had a Ruger Single Six with a 9.5" barrel that he always kept loaded for killing skunks and racoons etc.



Mom cracked the door open about 1" and the guy had just started in saying he wanted to talk to dad when mom stuck the barrel out the door. She said, " (Dad's name) IS NOT HERE!. NO GO HOME AND DON'T YOU DARE COME BACK UNTIL YOU ARE SOBER!" Mom and Bill Ruger put the fear of God into the man and he got the hell gone.



20 some years later I asked my mom about it and she denied it. So I asked my brother and he said he remembered it. Mom still denied it. By this time mom and dad had divorced and I asked my dad about it. He said "Yeah it happened that was (guy's name) that night looking for me. He never came by the house after that." Mom still denied it. Five years later, dad had passed away by then, we were talking and the subject came up and mom finally admitted it happened.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:20:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 4:21:45 PM EDT by capnrob97]
My Dad served in WWII, Sgt on a mortar crew in the Army.

Wounded at the Battle of the Bulge, came home and married my Mom.

I was the last of 5 kids and definitely an accident (born 5 years after the last kid and both parents in their 40s).

Mom was a raging alcoholic, Dad was a CEO and traveling all the time on business.

Both are deceased now and I am still trucking.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:24:07 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Aimless:


I told this one before.



When my dad retired he used to help organize and kind of "chaperone" tours of farmers in Europe. The men would go to a dairy in Sweden or where ever and talk shop with the local farmers while the wives went sight seeing or shopping. Then everyone got together for dinner and a play or symphony or whatever.





Mom and dad were at some restaurant in Paris in their "Grandma" and "Grandpa" sweatshirts and my dad wearing a John Deere cap. My parents were the nicest, politest people but didn't speak french and had mostly lived in the country. I guess they were getting the stink eye from the waiter who probably was just GROANING at a couple hick Americans showing up at his table.





My dad never really talked about his time in the Army in World War II, but he got hit by something, artillery or mortar, he was hospitalized in Italy and all the bones in his feet were fused and he could never walk right but it never slowed him down. Anyway the waiter came by to pick up the check and my mom was shocked when my dad looked at the waiter and said "You fellas sure were a lot happier to see me the last time I cam through here"

View Quote
Awesome!!!!

 
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:25:12 PM EDT
They got married, went on a honeymoon (Niagara Falls, of course!), and came home to a fully furnished apartment waiting for them.  He worked as a blue collar Western Electric guy and made it happen somehow.



Still a role model for me, and they live just 4 miles away.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:29:36 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vim:
They got married, went on a honeymoon (Niagara Falls, of course!), and came home to a fully furnished apartment waiting for them.  He worked as a blue collar Western Electric guy and made it happen somehow.

Still a role model for me, and they live just 4 miles away.
View Quote


I like your avatar, two of those 'black and white' tiles are actually the same color.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:38:17 PM EDT
My parents just celebrated their 65 anniversary. They love each other now as much if not more then the day they got married. So many wonderful stories it'd be hard to post.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:44:11 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By capnrob97:
I like your avatar, two of those 'black and white' tiles are actually the same color.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By capnrob97:



Originally Posted By vim:

They got married, went on a honeymoon (Niagara Falls, of course!), and came home to a fully furnished apartment waiting for them.  He worked as a blue collar Western Electric guy and made it happen somehow.



Still a role model for me, and they live just 4 miles away.




I like your avatar, two of those 'black and white' tiles are actually the same color.


Yep, A and B.  The brain does funny things with input.



 
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:49:49 PM EDT
No.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:50:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 4:52:56 PM EDT by fastswift]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:

I would but I don't think I could finish the post.

In to hear other stories.
View Quote


Yea...it has been three years since we lost my dad I heard things from friends and neighbors at his service that i never knew...unbelievable acts of kindness and charity to others that he kept to himself - in addition to being a kind role model and head of our family.

My 19 year old daughter drew this the other day after she said she had a dream about Grandpa - when I showed it to my mom she just laughed (with tears in her eyes) and said it was the first time she saw dad with his shirt tucked in..
.
</a>" />
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 4:54:02 PM EDT
I've shared this one before:


Originally Posted By primuspilum:
This is about 1980 or so. When I was about 10, my brother, sister and I were visiting with my father for the weekend.

There was a diner called "The Blue Comet" on Baltimore Pike in Landsdowne outside Philly. (it's still there).

There are train tracks behind the restaurant. Parking is out back, the diner is right up to the road. There's a chest high fence closing off the parking lot.

So, we pull into the parking lot. As we get out of the car, the train signal starts sounding and lights begin flashing. There's an intersection of the train tracks and a side road about a block away, which we can see directly, line of sight.

There are five or six cars lined up waiting for the train to pass. The signal has been going for about 30 seconds. No train yet, no horn.

(the signal and barrier were sort of like this one [not the actual pic], but the barrier just blocked one lane on the approach side and likewise on the far side. If you pulled into the "wrong" lane, you could make it past the barrier on both sides.)





The last car in the row decides he's not going to wait. I forget what kind of car, it was a big early 70's 4 door sedan, like a Fury or Impala. Big.

So, he pulls around the line of cars. Slowly, haltingly. It's either too much car for the guy or there's something wrong with him.

As the driver is pulling back and forth to get the car in position to pull around traffic, we hear the train horn for the first time.

We can see the car at a slight angle. We are looking directly down the train tracks at the oncoming train.

Everybody, pedestrians on the street (the closest are more than a block away), people in the parking lot of the Blue Comet, even passengers in the other cars, start screaming and waiving the guy in the last car off, trying to get his attention. Well, he's not hearing the train horn, he certainly isn't paying attention to the people around him.

Once he got the car's front end cleared of the car in front of him, he just gunned it.

It's like it was rehearsed because he just pulled right into the path of the oncoming train.

BOOOM!

The train hit the car and it was like an A Team car crash, immediately burst into flame. The train tore the car almost completely in half and it was engulfed in flames.

The car pinwheeled, for the most part, so it wasn't thrown more that 20' or so.

At the moment of impact, my father literally burst into a sprint and jumped the fence. As he cleared the fence, he said something like "Stay there" to us kids.

He was in a full sprint as people just stood there in shock, mouths opened, as the car burned.

Of course, me and my brother and sister followed but kept our distance.

When he got to what was left of the car, he stopped. It was burning.

He took off his shirt, covered his hands with it like they were an oven mit and tried opening the driver's door. It opened.

He lifted a frail, probably 70 or 80 year old man out of the driver seat. By this time, a woman came running up and said she was a Nurse, so my Dad handed the guy over to her. The heat off the car was intense by this point and you could feel it on your skin 20-30' away.

The old man sputtered and grabbed my Dad's arm. He said "My wife!".

By this time the back of the car intensely burning. The front was on fire, too, just not as bad.

As soon as the man said "wife" my Dad did an about face and sprinted back to the car. He tried using his shirt on the door handle, but it didn't work. He picked up a piece of debris or a rock or something and broke out the remainder of the passenger side window and pulled an equally frail 70 or 80 year old lady from the car.

He took her over to where the lady who said she was the nurse was.

My Dad turned around, walked over to us and said "Let's go."


We walked back to the Blue Comet. My Dad helped us back over the fence, we got back in the car and drove back to my Dad's.

We never talked about it.

My Dad never said a word about it.

He didn't stick around to talk to the cops, news, etc.

The next day, there was a "mystery hero" article in the paper. My Dad never came forward.






http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1646889_.html&r=49211285&qte=1
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 5:00:04 PM EDT
In high school, a friend and I were skateboarding down the hill that I lived on when the 3, 20 year old assholes from the neighborhood ran us off the road in their pickup. As they were rounding the corner my buddy flipped them the bird. You could hear those dicks burn rubber as they drove around the block back to where we were standing. As they pulled up they asked if we wanted any shit and began getting out of the truck.

Before one of those fuckers feet touched the ground, my dad came bustin' out of the house, in his tighty whities, with a can of gasoline and a lighter in his hand asking WHAT IN THE FUCK IS GOING ON?...He's not a big dude by any means but I guess he had that look in his eye. They split and never bothered us again.

It was extremely scary, funny and damn right impressive to say the least.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 5:00:27 PM EDT
When I was 14 years old, I was grounded for some reason or another, I don't recall what exactly.  In any event, I decided one evening during my grounding to visit a young lady, so I snuck out of the house around midnight, hopped on my bicycle, and rode the five miles or so to her house.  Upon arriving there, the young lady let me in, and she and I got down to business.  After a fair passage of time, the door bell rings, the young lady answers it, and in an astonished voice, she states, "MotorMouth, it's your father."

Man, was he ever pissed off. Without saying a word, he threw my bike in the trunk of his car, drove me home in silence, frog marched me into my bedroom, ripped the phone out of the wall, and didn't talk to me for two days.  

Years later I learned from my father that he saw me sneak out of the house, followed me in his car, and than waited outside of the young lady's house for half an hour.  Thanks, Dad.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 5:20:02 PM EDT
On the way home from Basic training and AIT.  had to make a overnight layover in Boston because they only had one fight to Maine in the morning.   I had no credit cards, about 20 bucks, my class A's on my back , and two packed duffel bags  I was going to use as a make shift bed in some quiet  corner of Logan airport.    walking up the ramp I see my brother and parents.  what a shocker.   I had no ideal they would even know I would of been there .   They must of called my command and set this up........      I Got a restaurant  dinner first in 6 months, and a no fire guard watch nights sleep.     and hugs before I got on my flight in the morning .  
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 5:45:05 PM EDT
My Dad would hold literacy classes for his employees once a week after work in the office break room. Mom would make them Ritz peanut butter cracker sandwiches and Cokes while they learned to read.



Mom and Dad almost made it to 50 years married; they were at 49 1/2 years when she passed in May of last year. She had only been a year retired form teaching high school Home Ec and Dad was semi retired from the demolition biz.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 6:08:20 PM EDT
My mom is Mexican American and my dad a 1st generation German American who grew up on a farm.  When they started dating he tried to impress her with his "vast" knowledge of Spanish (which she barely speaks).  He wanted to flirt and say "como estas" but instead asked her "cuanto cuestas?"  It earned him a quick slap across the face.  They were married 6 months later.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 6:11:59 PM EDT
My parents have managed to stay married for 51 years without killing each other, and if you knew them like I do you would be pretty impressed with that.

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 6:16:47 PM EDT
Mom had me walking at 7mos and writing cursive before I started kindergarten.
Almost failed it 'cause I didn't know how to print very well.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 6:51:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:31:17 PM EDT
I was adopted at 3 days old from a Christian children's home.  My mother got pregnant while unmarried, and my father ran off to a different part of Texas.  She gave me up for adoption.

My REAL parents chose me from a dozen other children.  They gave me and my sister (also adopted) love and affection at every turn.  They raised me to be a moral, honest man.  My mother taught me how a Christian woman acted and thought, preparing me for the day I might chose my own wife.  My father taught me how to be a man, in every sense of the word.  He also taught me, by example, how to be an excellent father...preparing me for the possible arrival of my own children some day.  He taught me how to run a household, how to work a job, how to love a good woman, and the many ways I could screw up all of the above.

Everything that I have, everything good that I have ever accomplished, is directly due to my parents.  I truly won life's lottery.  They are both still alive and in good health, and I try to take every opportunity to know what they have done for me and my sister.

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:31:44 PM EDT
My mom working 3 jobs around christmas to buy gifts. Used to go see her at the gas station sometimes.

My dad used to take me to mow lawns. I aways helped him. One thing they always taught me whether intentionally or not is that if you want something you can get it if you work hard enough.

They both are doing very well in life, and I am in a really good place as well. I am forever grateful for my upbringing.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:38:32 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By macaho45:
My mom is Mexican American and my dad a 1st generation German American who grew up on a farm.  When they started dating he tried to impress her with his "vast" knowledge of Spanish (which she barely speaks).  He wanted to flirt and say "como estas" but instead asked her "cuanto cuestas?"  It earned him a quick slap across the face.  They were married 6 months later.
View Quote


As someone who mastered Spanish later in life, this story made me giggle quite a bit.  Good for them, and good for you.

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:41:30 PM EDT
My mom got her boob caught in a wringer washer
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:49:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 7:51:55 PM EDT by katrina24]
Your dad is a Hero
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
I've shared this one before:


Originally Posted By primuspilum:
This is about 1980 or so. When I was about 10, my brother, sister and I were visiting with my father for the weekend.

There was a diner called "The Blue Comet" on Baltimore Pike in Landsdowne outside Philly. (it's still there).

There are train tracks behind the restaurant. Parking is out back, the diner is right up to the road. There's a chest high fence closing off the parking lot.

So, we pull into the parking lot. As we get out of the car, the train signal starts sounding and lights begin flashing. There's an intersection of the train tracks and a side road about a block away, which we can see directly, line of sight.

There are five or six cars lined up waiting for the train to pass. The signal has been going for about 30 seconds. No train yet, no horn.

(the signal and barrier were sort of like this one [not the actual pic], but the barrier just blocked one lane on the approach side and likewise on the far side. If you pulled into the "wrong" lane, you could make it past the barrier on both sides.)


http://www.triblocal.com/tinley-park/files/cache/2010/09/IMG_0450.jpg/460_345_resize.jpg



The last car in the row decides he's not going to wait. I forget what kind of car, it was a big early 70's 4 door sedan, like a Fury or Impala. Big.

So, he pulls around the line of cars. Slowly, haltingly. It's either too much car for the guy or there's something wrong with him.

As the driver is pulling back and forth to get the car in position to pull around traffic, we hear the train horn for the first time.

We can see the car at a slight angle. We are looking directly down the train tracks at the oncoming train.

Everybody, pedestrians on the street (the closest are more than a block away), people in the parking lot of the Blue Comet, even passengers in the other cars, start screaming and waiving the guy in the last car off, trying to get his attention. Well, he's not hearing the train horn, he certainly isn't paying attention to the people around him.

Once he got the car's front end cleared of the car in front of him, he just gunned it.

It's like it was rehearsed because he just pulled right into the path of the oncoming train.

BOOOM!

The train hit the car and it was like an A Team car crash, immediately burst into flame. The train tore the car almost completely in half and it was engulfed in flames.

The car pinwheeled, for the most part, so it wasn't thrown more that 20' or so.

At the moment of impact, my father literally burst into a sprint and jumped the fence. As he cleared the fence, he said something like "Stay there" to us kids.

He was in a full sprint as people just stood there in shock, mouths opened, as the car burned.

Of course, me and my brother and sister followed but kept our distance.

When he got to what was left of the car, he stopped. It was burning.

He took off his shirt, covered his hands with it like they were an oven mit and tried opening the driver's door. It opened.

He lifted a frail, probably 70 or 80 year old man out of the driver seat. By this time, a woman came running up and said she was a Nurse, so my Dad handed the guy over to her. The heat off the car was intense by this point and you could feel it on your skin 20-30' away.

The old man sputtered and grabbed my Dad's arm. He said "My wife!".

By this time the back of the car intensely burning. The front was on fire, too, just not as bad.

As soon as the man said "wife" my Dad did an about face and sprinted back to the car. He tried using his shirt on the door handle, but it didn't work. He picked up a piece of debris or a rock or something and broke out the remainder of the passenger side window and pulled an equally frail 70 or 80 year old lady from the car.

He took her over to where the lady who said she was the nurse was.

My Dad turned around, walked over to us and said "Let's go."


We walked back to the Blue Comet. My Dad helped us back over the fence, we got back in the car and drove back to my Dad's.

We never talked about it.

My Dad never said a word about it.

He didn't stick around to talk to the cops, news, etc.

The next day, there was a "mystery hero" article in the paper. My Dad never came forward.






http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1646889_.html&r=49211285&qte=1
View Quote

Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:50:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 7:52:36 PM EDT by katrina24]
Double tap   my bad,,,,,,,,

Your dad is a Hero......
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
I've shared this one before:


Originally Posted By primuspilum:
This is about 1980 or so. When I was about 10, my brother, sister and I were visiting with my father for the weekend.

There was a diner called "The Blue Comet" on Baltimore Pike in Landsdowne outside Philly. (it's still there).

There are train tracks behind the restaurant. Parking is out back, the diner is right up to the road. There's a chest high fence closing off the parking lot.

So, we pull into the parking lot. As we get out of the car, the train signal starts sounding and lights begin flashing. There's an intersection of the train tracks and a side road about a block away, which we can see directly, line of sight.

There are five or six cars lined up waiting for the train to pass. The signal has been going for about 30 seconds. No train yet, no horn.

(the signal and barrier were sort of like this one [not the actual pic], but the barrier just blocked one lane on the approach side and likewise on the far side. If you pulled into the "wrong" lane, you could make it past the barrier on both sides.)


http://www.triblocal.com/tinley-park/files/cache/2010/09/IMG_0450.jpg/460_345_resize.jpg



The last car in the row decides he's not going to wait. I forget what kind of car, it was a big early 70's 4 door sedan, like a Fury or Impala. Big.

So, he pulls around the line of cars. Slowly, haltingly. It's either too much car for the guy or there's something wrong with him.

As the driver is pulling back and forth to get the car in position to pull around traffic, we hear the train horn for the first time.

We can see the car at a slight angle. We are looking directly down the train tracks at the oncoming train.

Everybody, pedestrians on the street (the closest are more than a block away), people in the parking lot of the Blue Comet, even passengers in the other cars, start screaming and waiving the guy in the last car off, trying to get his attention. Well, he's not hearing the train horn, he certainly isn't paying attention to the people around him.

Once he got the car's front end cleared of the car in front of him, he just gunned it.

It's like it was rehearsed because he just pulled right into the path of the oncoming train.

BOOOM!

The train hit the car and it was like an A Team car crash, immediately burst into flame. The train tore the car almost completely in half and it was engulfed in flames.

The car pinwheeled, for the most part, so it wasn't thrown more that 20' or so.

At the moment of impact, my father literally burst into a sprint and jumped the fence. As he cleared the fence, he said something like "Stay there" to us kids.

He was in a full sprint as people just stood there in shock, mouths opened, as the car burned.

Of course, me and my brother and sister followed but kept our distance.

When he got to what was left of the car, he stopped. It was burning.

He took off his shirt, covered his hands with it like they were an oven mit and tried opening the driver's door. It opened.

He lifted a frail, probably 70 or 80 year old man out of the driver seat. By this time, a woman came running up and said she was a Nurse, so my Dad handed the guy over to her. The heat off the car was intense by this point and you could feel it on your skin 20-30' away.

The old man sputtered and grabbed my Dad's arm. He said "My wife!".

By this time the back of the car intensely burning. The front was on fire, too, just not as bad.

As soon as the man said "wife" my Dad did an about face and sprinted back to the car. He tried using his shirt on the door handle, but it didn't work. He picked up a piece of debris or a rock or something and broke out the remainder of the passenger side window and pulled an equally frail 70 or 80 year old lady from the car.

He took her over to where the lady who said she was the nurse was.

My Dad turned around, walked over to us and said "Let's go."


We walked back to the Blue Comet. My Dad helped us back over the fence, we got back in the car and drove back to my Dad's.

We never talked about it.

My Dad never said a word about it.

He didn't stick around to talk to the cops, news, etc.

The next day, there was a "mystery hero" article in the paper. My Dad never came forward.






http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1646889_.html&r=49211285&qte=1
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Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:50:49 PM EDT
My dad saved and saved for a new motorcycle, found the one he wanted, drove 2 hours to see it. Told the guy he'd be back Monday to buy it. Got home, walked in the door and found out my mom was pregnant with me.

No motorcycle for pop.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:51:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 7:52:07 PM EDT by Clarinath]
My amazing mother.  She is a judge (21 years now), a gardener, and the light of my father's eye.  You can tell how much they love each other by the amount of bickering they do.



My dad.  He's a hell of a man, and won't allow coarse words to be spoken in the presence of my mother, no matter where they are.  When I was a kid, bar fights were still allowed and he always had a smile on his face when acquaintences would tussle.  



They met while in the Army and were married.  They had 4 kids, one died a year after the birth, another when she was 22.

My sister and I survived to adulthood and followed in their footsteps.



Last weekend we canned all day on Sunday and it was good times had by all.  We are a close family and spend lots of time together.  I dread the day they are no longer here...
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:52:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2015 7:52:44 PM EDT by runcible]
I think the best Thanksgiving we ever had was one when we didn't even have a turkey.

Mom and Dad sat us kids down, and explained that business hadn't been good at Dad's store, so we couldn't afford a turkey.





We had vegetables and bread and pie, and it was just fine.
Later, I went into Mom and Dad's bedroom to thank them, and I caught them eating a little turkey.










I guess that wasn't really the best Thanksgiving.
 

 

 
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:52:55 PM EDT
My favorite story of his is he was outside Great Bend Kansas in his GTO, brand new Mustang pulled up beside him on the edge of town and revved the motor at him.

They both took off and raced down the highway, dad said he topped out about 125mph and let off. Drove another few miles, pulled in the driveway and went in and went to bed.

Got up the next day, drove to the corner, turned and the ball joint broke off.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:54:44 PM EDT
Married for 47 years...till death did they part...still miss pops
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:54:57 PM EDT
I had great parents. As I was thinking of a story to share it got dusty in here. They are gone now and they are missed every day. Everyone do yourself a favor and show them this thread and let them know you shared a story in it.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 7:56:25 PM EDT
Pop was usually working night work for the extra pennies per hour difference.  He was home on a Friday night and I was supposed to go to the movies with my friends.  Friends knock and I turn to Pop for movie money.  He gave me  some change and I stood there a little too long.  He asked what was wrong and I said that could I have some extra for popcorn.  He took all the money back and;  What do you want to do see the movie or eat?!  Never got to the movies and I had to tell my friends that I wasn't allowed out.  Truly was a great provider but money was tight and he was tighter.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:32:25 PM EDT
I spilled a can of paint in the garage once and Dad burned the fuck out of my arm with his cigarette.  

In high school I would get a carton of smokes for Christmas.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:44:21 PM EDT
They adopted me soon after I was born, in mexico. According to mom and dad, I had pneumonia or something like that when I was a few days old. If it hadn't been for them, I'd be dead right now. Or worse, living in a shitty country.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:45:19 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DirkDirkovich:
I spilled a can of paint in the garage once and Dad burned the fuck out of my arm with his cigarette.  

In high school I would get a carton of smokes for Christmas.
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Did you ever beat the shit out of him?
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:46:41 PM EDT
Don't get me wrong, I love my dad. He's a great guy but teaching life lessons was not his forte.  

It may be because I spent so much time with my mom driving me back and forth to school everyday for 3 years. Also, in my formative years, my dad was on the road a lot as a salesman. He had a rough time with his dad growing up, practically raising my aunt's and uncles as he was oldest.  

Like I said I love him and take nothing away from as I never wanted for anything and I actually get to work with him now, which is pretty cool, I get to see my pops on a daily basis, at least until next Friday which is my last day with the company.

My mom definitely taught me how to cuss on the slippery roads in the morning and she taught what it means to care about someone more than myself. Like I said, I love my dad and he took care of us kids, but my mom is the the one that did raising and the, I guess, the imparting of the values.

I can't myself ever mistreating a woman for any reason because I will always see my mother in her, and there's just no fucking way that shits ever gonna happen.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:49:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Aimless:
I told this one before.

When my dad retired he used to help organize and kind of "chaperone" tours of farmers in Europe. The men would go to a dairy in Sweden or where ever and talk shop with the local farmers while the wives went sight seeing or shopping. Then everyone got together for dinner and a play or symphony or whatever.


Mom and dad were at some restaurant in Paris in their "Grandma" and "Grandpa" sweatshirts and my dad wearing a John Deere cap. My parents were the nicest, politest people but didn't speak french and had mostly lived in the country. I guess they were getting the stink eye from the waiter who probably was just GROANING at a couple hick Americans showing up at his table.


My dad never really talked about his time in the Army in World War II, but he got hit by something, artillery or mortar, he was hospitalized in Italy and all the bones in his feet were fused and he could never walk right but it never slowed him down. Anyway the waiter came by to pick up the check and my mom was shocked when my dad looked at the waiter and said "You fellas sure were a lot happier to see me the last time I cam through here"
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A Member here has-had the sig. line, "What part of Europe are you from? The part we Saved, or, the Part who's Asses We Kicked"? Can't remember who it is, any help?
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:56:59 PM EDT
Mine met on a party line call. They were 17 when they got married and had to run off to Mississippi to get married. My mother went back home that night and the next three nights as well because they were too scared to tell their parents,
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 9:06:55 PM EDT
Great thread.
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