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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 12/16/2016 9:07:07 PM EST
Wife wants one. My understanding is they're good dogs. Don't shed, good hunting dogs and are very smart.

How are they as inside dogs with kids? We do have room for it to stretch it's legs though.

Any issues I should be aware of?
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:10:00 PM EST
Standards are great dogs but can be a bit high strung around kids, especially ones they were not raised with.

Very territorial and loyally protective.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:11:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Dagger41:
Standards are great dogs but can be a bit high strung around kids, especially ones they were not raised with.

Very territorial and loyally protective.
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We'd be getting a puppy. We have two kids. 1.5 and 7 years old.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:12:29 PM EST
Great dogs... congrats
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:12:59 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Slug-O:
Great dogs... congrats
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Awesome
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:13:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/16/2016 9:14:33 PM EST by ludder093]
the only real downside to standard poodles is the grooming cost and upkeep. 

Great dogs, Protective but friendly. Good with kids, very smart and they are good for hunting as well. 
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:14:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pbol53:

We'd be getting a puppy. We have two kids. 1.5 and 7 years old.
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Best way to do it, the pup will be fine however your youngsters will have to learn to treat the dog with respect.
Although they are very playful they will not tolerate abuse of any sort.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:15:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/16/2016 9:16:20 PM EST by grady]
They are smart.

Most lines have had the hunting bred out of them in favor of stupid conformance traits.

If you can find a breeder that still maintains the hunting lines, you will get a great dog with a better temperament than the show/conformance lines and will be better off even if you never hunt with it.

Those lines, unfortunately, are no longer easy to find.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:18:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By grady:
They are smart.

Most lines have had the hunting bred out of them in favor of stupid conformance traits.

If you can find a breeder that still maintains the hunting lines, you will get a great dog with a better temperament than the show/conformance lines and will be better off even if you never hunt with it.

Those lines, unfortunately, are no longer easy to find.
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Interesting. Thanks for the info.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:18:22 PM EST
The only story I can tell you about a standard, is one year my grandfather got one to replace his lab that was getting too old to hunt. After training the first year he brought that dog out in the field, his hunting buddies laughed and gave him much shit(like most hunters do with their buddys, shit talking is part of bird hunting).

After that first hunt they all shut the fuck up. His standard poodle did better than his buddies dogs. So....there is that.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:18:48 PM EST
Great dogs. My buddy has two that are 11 and 12. Outside of cataracts they're very healthy. Super smart and hardly ever bark.

For me, they're a bit boring, though. Not very big personalities. I'd look at a labradoodle
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:19:14 PM EST
How are they generally as a watch dog?
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:21:17 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pbol53:
How are they generally as a watch dog?
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Excellent.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:21:23 PM EST
Make sure you get the stage ll clutch kit and throw some coin for a high end throwout bearing
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:24:20 PM EST
Good looking dogs with the hunting cuts...

Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:24:58 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pbol53:

Interesting. Thanks for the info.
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Interesting info on poodles:

The goofy looking grooming, although associated with high falootin' snobbery, comes from being bred for hunting in extremely cold water conditions. They were bred to have extremely full/dense coats that would keep them warm and dry in the worst conditions. But that limited mobility. So they would shave the fur around the joints to keep them mobile.

Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:25:15 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pbol53:
How are they generally as a watch dog?
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Like a fancy four legged chain saw.   a All bite and very little bark.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:30:19 PM EST
About 20 years ago, I think, a guy ran the Iditarod with standard poodles, he didn't win, but did finish respectably!! They are tough dogs, don't let her foo foo it up too much!!
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:31:13 PM EST
They look a little freaky to me.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:33:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/16/2016 9:33:50 PM EST by jarhead13]
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Originally Posted By grady:


Interesting info on poodles:

The goofy looking grooming, although associated with high falootin' snobbery, comes from being bred for hunting in extremely cold water conditions. They were bred to have extremely full/dense coats that would keep them warm and dry in the worst conditions. But that limited mobility. So they would shave the fur around the joints to keep them mobile.
View Quote


I may be wrong, but they would allow the coat to grow around the joints to protect them and keep them warm in cold weather.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:33:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By katrina24:
Make sure you get the stage ll clutch kit and throw some coin for a high end throwout bearing
View Quote


Ok.....kinda good I'll give you that.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:34:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/16/2016 9:35:45 PM EST by pbol53]
Didn't realize they were so protective. Not an issue really but interesting.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:35:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By BigPapaColt:


Ok.....kinda good I'll give you that.
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I'm slow apparently. I don't get it.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:36:09 PM EST
I took some Cub Scouts to a pet store a while back on an outing about pet care.  They put a poodle in one of the booths for us to visit.   The dog really liked me and they begged me to take it at a deep discount.   I had blood running down my arm and replied it was a wee bit mouthy for me and whoever played with it to teach it that should have been flogged.   Great dog, horrible biter.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:43:53 PM EST
Excellent dogs. Have one now, smarter then me. Definitely the other halfs dog, but listens well. Ours is a therapy dog and enjoys the work. Sporting or puppy cut, the poofy one is actually a water hunting cut as noted.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:47:02 PM EST
On our 3rd, ours have all been ok with kids. Maybe a little hesitant the first time they meet news ones but never rough. Once they get used to them they love to play with them .
Almost too smart for their own good. I swear if they could figure out doorknobs they wouldn't need us.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:48:48 PM EST
Just think of them as a really really smart horse.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:54:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By tnriverluver:
Just think of them as a really really smart horse.
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But horses are about the dumbest mammal on the planet...

Kharn
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:56:06 PM EST
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Originally Posted By jarhead13:


I may be wrong, but they would allow the coat to grow around the joints to protect them and keep them warm in cold weather.
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I may have it backwards. I know that the cut started as a utilitarian cut for hunting purposes and was later adopted and/or changed when they started breeding them for show purposes.

It started for function, not looks. The cut was about hunting, not Westminster. Of that I'm certain.



Link Posted: 12/16/2016 9:56:53 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pbol53:

I'm slow apparently. I don't get it.
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Originally Posted By pbol53:
Originally Posted By BigPapaColt:


Ok.....kinda good I'll give you that.

I'm slow apparently. I don't get it.

Standard, as in stick shift transmission with a clutch.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:07:59 PM EST
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Originally Posted By grady:


Interesting info on poodles:

The goofy looking grooming, although associated with high falootin' snobbery, comes from being bred for hunting in extremely cold water conditions. They were bred to have extremely full/dense coats that would keep them warm and dry in the worst conditions. But that limited mobility. So they would shave the fur around the joints to keep them mobile.
View Quote

BULL FUCKING PARROTED FROM SOME AKC DOG BOOK SHIT!

Those show cuts are no more for hunting than a crippled squat in the rear GSD stance is for being 'ready for action'.

Show me a serious hunter that show cuts his poodles and I'll take it back.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:11:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By bankfraudguy:

BULL FUCKING PARROTED FROM SOME AKC DOG BOOK SHIT!

Those show cuts are no more for hunting than a crippled squat in the rear GSD stance is for being 'ready for action'.

Show me a serious hunter that show cuts his poodles and I'll take it back.
View Quote


See my follow up post. Some form of utilitarian cut originated with hunting. I'm not saying that show cuts are the same, but derived from that.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:12:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Kharn:

But horses are about the dumbest mammal on the planet...

Kharn
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View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By Kharn:
Originally Posted By tnriverluver:
Just think of them as a really really smart horse.

But horses are about the dumbest mammal on the planet...

Kharn

We already have 3 horses
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:17:10 PM EST
Highly intelligent. Personalities vary between dogs, but generally good hunting instincts, active dogs that like water and protective.
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:22:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By kpoesq369:
On our 3rd, ours have all been ok with kids. Maybe a little hesitant the first time they meet news ones but never rough. Once they get used to them they love to play with them .
Almost too smart for their own good. I swear if they could figure out doorknobs they wouldn't need us.
View Quote

We have one, great dog, big personality, wicked smart. Had already figured out lever type door knobs; also had to hide the car keys as he could let himself out...
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:22:56 PM EST
When I was a kid my family had a toy poodle and then a few years later got a standard poodle with a white coat (not exactly a puppy when we got her, but not fully grown either).

The toy poodle was sharp as a tack.

The standard, well, not smart at all. Maybe we got a defective one. And she went absolutely bonkers whenever there was a thunderstorm nearby.

I was never a dog enthusiast to begin with, and I had to clean the dog crap out of the fenced-in area of the backyard where the dogs 'lived' when outside, and so I grew to dislike them even more, especially the larger one (larger dog = bigger dog crap).

A few years later she disappeared from our backyard (really - I had nothing to do with the disappearance) - and months after that, we saw a local newspaper article about a pack of unruly wild dogs roaming about town, led by a white standard poodle. So evidently somehow she turned into the "leader of the pack."



Link Posted: 12/16/2016 10:24:50 PM EST
We really like our poodle. We have owned short haired dogs are were surprised how much hair they shed. We do have a monthly grooming bill though.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:56:46 AM EST
Had 4 different ones growing up.

Not the smartest dogs.
Heel nippers ( Draw Blood ) esp when excited kids getting them worked up and running around.
All hated cats with passion and would never accept one as part of the pack.
$$$$ Regular Grooming and hair cuts.
Susceptible to stomach twisting.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:59:29 AM EST
Parents have a cockapoo.

Hypoallergenic shit is nice, not a loose hair anywhere.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:09:29 AM EST
I had 5 GSDs growing up. About tens years ago I "accidentally" bought a toy poodle at an auction/fundraiser for my daughters school, think alcohol. The dog is the absolute best dog I've ever had. He is super smart, a great despoition and is very protective, very protective. He can almost read my mind. Never had a dog like him.
I'd love to have a standard.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:41:20 AM EST
All I ever saw growing up were miniature poodles, all of them obnoxious and yappy and frequently around a bunch of damned Chihuahuas. Fucking fail train of ankle biters and I swore I'd never own one.

Well the wife is allergic to pet dander so we're stuck with lower allergen breeds. Our Yorkie died last year and after about a year of doing without we decided to look into something that was a little larger breed and the various poodle mixes came up.

I've had Australian shepherds growing up and she had a std poodle so for whatever reason we settled on a aussie-poodle mix. He looks more like a standard poodle than an aussie but he's turning into quite a good dog. Extremely trainable and shockingly fast at learning new tasks/tricks, but he does have a LOT of energy and he's pretty mouthy, which can get annoying.

Honestly I always thought of them as frou-frou dogs but he's pretty high energy, good runner, decent barker and extremely affectionate. If we're standing in the kitchen talking he's probably got his paw on one of our feet while he's resting. it's pretty interesting really.

I'm pretty happy with him but he's not a dog for laying around the house. They're smart and if you don't keep them busy or entertained they'll find something to do and you probably wont like it.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:54:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By pbol53:
Wife wants one. My understanding is they're good dogs. Don't shed, good hunting dogs and are very smart.

How are they as inside dogs with kids? We do have room for it to stretch it's legs though.

Any issues I should be aware of?
View Quote


I have a 9 year old standard poodle (wife's dog). Wife got him from a breeder with a national reputation.

Good: VERY good with kids, now 6 and 4, who aren't always the gentlest, does not shed, tolerates being indoors, smart, vicious sounding bark, loves being around his family.

Bad: total spaz, always underfoot, no common sense, teeth and ear infection problems. He has gotten better as he has aged, except that he has gotten more territorial and now wants to kill small dogs and cats. We probably won't get another one when he dies; we like other breeds better.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 3:06:35 AM EST
They don't shed! Huge plus!
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 3:19:30 AM EST
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Originally Posted By bankfraudguy:
Show me a serious hunter that show cuts his poodles and I'll take it back.
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Link Posted: 12/17/2016 3:22:54 AM EST
They tend to be more standard than the non-standard types...
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