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Posted: 12/17/2016 5:56:39 PM EDT
I recently turned 41 and my vision is getting bad, especially up close, I can't see shit. It's next to impossible to read medicine labels,  recognizing people from a distance is a real bitch now, basically I'm a old man and it sucks.

Those that have had Lasik, care to share your results?
I always heard your close up vision goes to shit, which mine already is, so I don't see how that would help. Then I read about poor night vision, light halos and other crap. Is this stuff true or just internet rumors?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:13:15 PM EDT
[#1]
I had mine done about 18 months ago at 32 yrs old. Absolute best thing I've ever done, wish I had done it sooner. My eye doctor said I was a perfect candidate for it. I have had no problems. TLC laser center done mine. They told me if your not a good candidate they won't perform the surgery.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:15:28 PM EDT
[#2]
Best thing ever.
I had mine done in 2001 I think, so I was 35.   I had no problems with close up vision.  Still do not need reading glasses.  One eey got to 20/15, the other to no quite 20/20 - the anesthesia drops were wearing off and my eye may have been twitching by then.  It felt like someone pressing down on my eyeball with a pencil eraser.   I am still pretty good as far as distant vision goes.
I do have some issues with dry eyes but did before lasik anyways.   I will just about legally blind beforehand.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:16:09 PM EDT
[#3]
Lasik does make you a bit farsighted so my doctor gave me "monovision" with 20/15 in one eye and 20/50 in the weaker eye for reading. It was good for about 8-9 years then I got old. I didn't have to use reading glasses until recently, in my 50's. My distance vision is still good.

The reason why you need reading glasses as you get older is that the lens inside the eye continues to grow as you get older. Not much you can do about it. The muscles/tendons that change the shape of the lens go slack and lose the ability to focus the lens. I heard of a few doctors trying to shorten/tighten these muscles but nothing has really worked out so far.

ETA, I never had any problems with flaring/bright lights but the first year or so, stepping out into a dark twilight level of light was weird for me. Almost like something was wrong with my vision, "dizzy". It lasted for only few minutes until my eyes adjusted. I don't have this problem anymore.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:17:53 PM EDT
[#4]
I had it done in '04 at the age of 24. Literally the best thing I ever did for myself and I've never regretted it. I don't think my eyes are now as sharp as they were in the immediate years after surgery, but still easily 20/20.

The drawbacks? Some starbursting in low light or high contrast situations like at the movies, watching TV in the dark, or street signs at night. That diminished greatly over the years, but was prevalent during the first two. I don't notice it any more.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:20:23 PM EDT
[#5]
If you're a handgun shooter and get monovision I suggest you get the opposite of what most other people do.
The norm is to have your dominant eye 20/20 and your weak eye is slightly corrected for up close/reading.
This sucks for shooting handguns.
Talk to your Doc about getting your dominant eye adjusted for up close/arms length and your weak eye for distance.
I wish I had of done that because my ability to see the front sights (especially under low light) sucks unless I go cross dominant and use my weak eye to focus on the front sight.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:21:51 PM EDT
[#6]
and it's painless.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:24:36 PM EDT
[#7]
Do it!  

Best money I ever spent!
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:30:59 PM EDT
[#8]
Ask your optometrist for recommendations on surgeons.  Be super careful whom you pick to mess with your eyes.

I had mine done in 2000, when I was 32.  

I was never at 20/20 after surgery, but I had severe astigmatism and nearsightedness and was lucky they came out as great as they did.

Currently at 48 I have one eye that is about 20/30 and one at 20/40 with one eye not even needing reading glasses.

Best money I ever spent considering how bad my eyes were.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:31:31 PM EDT
[#9]
As you age and your eyes change, would you need it repeated periodically?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:33:03 PM EDT
[#10]
I had it done in 1998 at 55. Was one of the earliest to have it done. I was legally blind without glasses. I have haloing and starbursting. I now need to wear glasses for both distance and reading but the correction is minor. I am very glad I had it done and would do it again. Today they have greatly improved the procedure.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:34:06 PM EDT
[#11]
Optometrist in da house

So, reading your post suggests that your vision has changed...more close range, but also distance.  I would not suggest you get a permanent solution like Laser vision correction if your vision is still changing.  It means in a few years, it may change enough to cause blurry vision again..and wasted several thousand dollars.  If your distance vision is not that bad and you can still read street signs from some distance away, they can use laser to correct only one eye, Monovision, as someone mentioned above (one eye used for distance, one eye for near tasks), but with this you lose binocular (stereo) vision and depth perception, night vision goes out the window.  So based on your job function, daily activities, 3D movies, shooting stance/eye dominance, monovision may not be a good solution to your needs.

My advise, if you are interested in Laser vision correction, it's only worth it if you are a good candidate with monovision at this point.  To see if you can adapt to monovision, I normally test trial frame a monovision prescription for my patients to look around the exam/office to see if they can handle it, then let them try Contact Lenses with that monovision Rx and see how they adapt to it with their routine lives.  If they adapt to it and it helps them function without much trouble, then I send them down to the Laser center.  If they cannot adapt, then the answer it no Laser and no Monovision.  

May be time to get a discussion going with your eye doctor about available correction options based on your eyes/needs.  You have different glasses/lens types options, different Contact Lens options, and Laser Monovision (if you are a good candidate, based on the above tips).  Hope that helps.

eta:  Emphasis, night vision will be worst with monovision.  That's a fact, because only one eye is being used for distance.  Eye dominance and shooting- somebody above mentioned about making non-dominant eye for distance and dominant eye to see sights...bad suggestion.  Everybody's eyes are different and dominance is there for a reason.  Most times, we correct the dominant eye for distance and non-dominant eye for near.  Sometimes it may work the other way around, but don't just throw misinformation around without knowing fully how another person's eyes/brain work.  
Most important, even if you have the best doctor and the best laser device, there's always that unpredictable small chance something may not be as expected based on how each person's eye take the surgery, how it heals, etc.  These unpredictable factors are what causes a person's vision to not be as ideal as expected and will only be determined days/weeks after the surgery as it heals...
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:34:34 PM EDT
[#12]
The technology is very mature now. If you get checked out and eye surgery is a viable option I would highly recommend it.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:35:49 PM EDT
[#13]
I had mine done 5 years ago.  I had a moderate astigmatism.  I now have exceptional vision.  

My doc does free "touch ups" if needed later in life.  

I went to the best guy I could find. It was almost 6 grand total.  

I had slight dry eye for the first year but now it's fine.  

Can't recommend it enough but understand that you are fucking with a pretty important organ.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:37:09 PM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
As you age and your eyes change, would you need it repeated periodically?
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My doc said... Maybe.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:38:32 PM EDT
[#15]
It's great. I had the surgery performed when I turned 19. My eyes are still 20/20 today.

Cost was 1.5k per eye. They also talked me into doing a lifetime corrections insurance. Basically, if my vision were to ever blur or lose focus to come in and they'll correct it free of charge. This insurance cost me an extra 1.5k

Do not buy the insurance, I repeat, do not buy the insurance! The company went out of business 3 years after I got it done. I asked the company that bought the old company if they had worked in something for the lifetime correction insurance from the previous company, they told me to FOAD. I joined a class action and got 12 bucks per eye!  

So, 6k for perfect vision. I'm a happy camper. I could have had it done for 3k. That was a ton of money for me at the time. I was in and out in under 8 minutes. I couldn't believe how fast he made that money.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:42:00 PM EDT
[#16]
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Quoted:
As you age and your eyes change, would you need it repeated periodically?
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That's my concern.  All these young folks getting it done...what's the result going to be in the long run?


Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:42:39 PM EDT
[#17]
I had mine done about 10 years ago and it was the best investment I ever made in myself. Never regretted it. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:42:58 PM EDT
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I had mine done 5 years ago.  I had a moderate astigmatism.  I now have exceptional vision.  

My doc does free "touch ups" if needed later in life.  

I went to the best guy I could find. It was almost 6 grand total.  

I had slight dry eye for the first year but now it's fine.  

Can't recommend it enough but understand that you are fucking with a pretty important organ.
View Quote


I was waiting for someone to throw out a number.

My glasses aren't $6k worth of annoying yet.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:43:12 PM EDT
[#19]
We had a member here who killed himself because of LASIK gone bad.

Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:44:09 PM EDT
[#20]
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:44:51 PM EDT
[#21]
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Quoted:
We had a member here who killed himself because of LASIK gone bad.

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That's terrible. I can't remember that.

Is this the guy?

http://www.lasikcomplications.com/
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:48:04 PM EDT
[#22]
I opted for PRK rather than LASK.  Slightly longer, more painful recovery, but more durable with less chance for complications (no flap).

My close vision was unaffected, but it was good anyways.  The surgery has no impact on close vision,  but getting old makes your near vision go to crap.  After surgery I am 20/15 vision and have been for 6yrs... it's fantastic!

I did have extreme sensitivity to light for bit,  night vision took about 6mo to restore to normal.  Basically, horrid halo's and starbursts around any light source at night.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:49:34 PM EDT
[#23]
Lasik is the single best thing I've ever done for myself. I couldn't see a thing without glasses or contacts and now I see 20/15 with no assistance. I was early 20s and a perfect candidate, ymmv.

My close up vision is perfect. Doctor told me if I get Lasik I'll need reading glasses in my 40s or 50s and if I don't get Lasik I'll need reading glasses in my 40s or 50s.  Your eyes change as you age regardless of the surgery.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 6:58:18 PM EDT
[#24]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


What happened?  Did he go blind?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:14:58 PM EDT
[#25]
I laughed half way through the procedure because it was so easy.
I was SEVERELY near sighted. Anything past 6" from my nose was completely out of focus. There as a guy there the same day who used tri-focal glasses and they said I was worse than him.
They put numbing drops in your eyes, take a marker and mark on them (while your eyes are open) you dont feel a thing.
From there you lay down on your back and use a circular device to basically flatten your eyeball to make the cut for the flap. It doesnt hurt but was the most uncomfortable part, its just pressure.
The cut part doesnt hurt a single bit. Once the cut happens everything in that eye goes black. They flush it out and its real blurry like being underwater. From there the machine lined up and they say "just look at the red dot" As you look at it you hear buzzes like an old dial up modem and you can smell a little bit of burnt eye ball, nothing bad. This part takes about 15 seconds. They flush it out, lay the flap of your eye back over and smooth it out with a very small "brush". Repeat for the next eye.
Once both eyes were done I could already see. I could freaking see.

I got these things they put in your tear ducts so as your eyes create tears they wont drain and should promote healing I guess.They dissolve after some time, 24 hours or something.
From there you put sunglasses on, head to the hotel and go to sleep. Typically stuff like nyquil knocks me out, but it didnt this time. My eyes didnt hurt but they were watering so bad that it was literally like having them under a faucet. I couldnt sleep so that part kinda sucked. It didnt hurt but things were uncomfortable.
There are eye shields you have to wear for a week so you dont rub your eyes in your sleep and screw yourself.

The next morning I got up and I could stand at one end of the room and look out the peep hole of our door into the lobby. It was amazing. We went over and got my eyes checked, 20/20 vision.
I got some deal where i get free touch-ups for life as long as i get a yearly eye exam. I just had an exam a few weeks ago, 15/20 vision.
Completely life changing and not a day goes by that I dont look at the world differently. :D
would recommend 100%
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:29:01 PM EDT
[#26]
I'm 41 and just over 4 weeks removed from iLASIK and it is the best thing I've ever done. The worst was the first few hours after surgery where it felt like sandpaper u dear my eyelids but pain medications and sleep took care of that. I was wearing -5.75 contact lenses(i.e.: what eye chart do you want me to look at? Kind of blind) corrected to 20/15 with both eyes. I have no regrets about having it done and currently do not require reading glasses.
I recommend the total laser treatment, the flap is done with a laser and better mapping of the cornea...google iLASIK for nearby providers.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:34:23 PM EDT
[#27]
The Army did PRK for me in 2012 at age 23 and I'm still 20/10 from it- only issue is ocassional dry eyes in the am but I'm not complaining
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:36:40 PM EDT
[#28]
I did it in 2010 at 41, at 47 my long distance vision is 20/15. My near vision requires reading glasses, which I expected. Being nearsighted since 2nd grade, reading glasses to do up-close work or to change the oil in my cars is a MINOR INCONVENIENCE. At 47 my distance vision is still 20/15 and I use magnification for close work. Anyone who has a strong prescription and has shot long distance knows that the parallax is massively increased, making your focal point a tiny fraction of the scope exit. I feel like I am now part of the normal population with good distance vision that needs reading glasses later in life.

I recommend the correction insurance because I have it. I have continued my relationship with my doctor to have yearly eye exams, plus he is a shooter so he understands my need to see through scope, optic, sights etc. YMMV
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:40:45 PM EDT
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I was waiting for someone to throw out a number.

My glasses aren't $6k worth of annoying yet.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
I had mine done 5 years ago.  I had a moderate astigmatism.  I now have exceptional vision.  

My doc does free "touch ups" if needed later in life.  

I went to the best guy I could find. It was almost 6 grand total.  

I had slight dry eye for the first year but now it's fine.  

Can't recommend it enough but understand that you are fucking with a pretty important organ.


I was waiting for someone to throw out a number.

My glasses aren't $6k worth of annoying yet.


My job requires wearing an SCBA mask for FF work and a face shield when I'm intubating a patient.  That coupled with shooting and hunting in the winter, and poking my little kiddos in the face with my glasses made 6 grand totally worth it.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:44:34 PM EDT
[#30]
Best thing I ever did. Wished I had done it sooner.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:44:38 PM EDT
[#31]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


What happened?  Did he go blind?
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http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_8_22/259474_Need_Recommendation_for_Honest_LASIK_surgeon.html
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:49:49 PM EDT
[#32]
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Quoted:
If you're a handgun shooter and get monovision I suggest you get the opposite of what most other people do.
The norm is to have your dominant eye 20/20 and your weak eye is slightly corrected for up close/reading.
This sucks for shooting handguns.
Talk to your Doc about getting your dominant eye adjusted for up close/arms length and your weak eye for distance.
I wish I had of done that because my ability to see the front sights (especially under low light) sucks unless I go cross dominant and use my weak eye to focus on the front sight.
View Quote



I second that, the ONLY thing that messes me up is iron sights on a rifle, I'm right handed but had my left eye corrected for distance, should have done my right eye. The surgery is a piece of cake, you will not regret it.

Link Posted: 12/17/2016 7:56:04 PM EDT
[#33]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History

Damn.  That's beyond messed up.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:20:29 PM EDT
[#34]
Quoted:
I recently turned 41 and my vision is getting bad, especially up close, I can't see shit. It's next to impossible to read medicine labels,  recognizing people from a distance is a real bitch now, basically I'm a old man and it sucks.

Those that have had Lasik, care to share your results?
I always heard your close up vision goes to shit, which mine already is, so I don't see how that would help. Then I read about poor night vision, light halos and other crap. Is this stuff true or just internet rumors?
View Quote


Typically people that are near sighted get it for their distance vision.  It shifts the focal range from very close to a few feet to long distance and not so close.  In your case, you could fix your distance vision, but close up would be worse, or they could fix close up but distance would be worse.  It sounds like bifocals are a better solution to your issues.  

And if anyone is thinking about it, LASEK or PRK is a better option.  Most of the complications are from the flap and those procedures eliminate that failure mode.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:27:14 PM EDT
[#35]
I had it done in 2004 when I was 29 years old, in mexico.  Paid $1200 and I still see pretty good.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:30:12 PM EDT
[#36]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


damn, that's terrible
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:43:31 PM EDT
[#37]
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Quoted:


What happened?  Did he go blind?
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Quoted:


What happened?  Did he go blind?


Dry eye doesn't sound that serious / bad, but it is.   (ETA, this doesn't apply to notsubby, but it has caused suicides, I assumed that was his issue)

PRK / LASEK reduce the probability of that issue.  You don't cut the cornea, you only remove / slide to the side the bowman layer respectively.
ETA, You also don't get a scar that causes halos from cutting a flip.  The flap doesn't get a donut hole, or come completely off, because there is no flap.  And so on.  The recovery is about a week vs the next day but worth it for reducing the risk.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:46:17 PM EDT
[#38]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Dry eye doesn't sound that serious / bad, but it is.

PRK / LASEK reduce the probability of that issue.  You don't cut the cornea, you only remove / slide to the side the bowman layer respectively.
View Quote



He suffered from more than dry eye.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:51:25 PM EDT
[#39]
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Quoted:


That's my concern.  All these young folks getting it done...what's the result going to be in the long run?
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Most will still need reading glasses.  I'm at the age where I have to use reading glasses while wearing contacts.  I'm to the point of just switching entirely to glasses with progressive lenses.  I have thought about Lasik, but would prefer to see long term effects, reversing, etc  As we age reading glasses are pretty much a guarantee for most of us, so I just don't see the risk worth the reward.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:56:35 PM EDT
[#40]
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Quoted:
That's my concern.  All these young folks getting it done...what's the result going to be in the long run?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
As you age and your eyes change, would you need it repeated periodically?
That's my concern.  All these young folks getting it done...what's the result going to be in the long run?

I was 20/400 and waited until I was 40 to get LASIK.  I waited because most myopia stops getting worse after that age.  Mine did get worse, and now I wear glasses again.

I could have gotten an adjustment, but I was unsure whether it would be the last time, and besides, my new glasses are about 1/10th the thickness of the old ones, lol...

Actually, it was a miraculous procedure, and an amazing four year run.  As for the long-term consequences, it's been 17 years since my procedure, and my eyes are still very healthy - just a little myopic, with astigmatism and age-related presbyopia starting to become an issue.

I have heard that PRK is considered to be a better option now.  Don't know about LASEK, but anything that avoids the corneal flag can't be a bad thing.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:01:39 PM EDT
[#41]
I wasn't eligible.  Not everyone is.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:01:59 PM EDT
[#42]
Best money I ever spent. Would do it again in a heartbeat. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:04:35 PM EDT
[#43]
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Quoted:

I was 20/400 and waited until I was 40 to get LASIK.  I waited because most myopia stops getting worse after that age.  Mine did get worse, and now I wear glasses again.

I could have gotten an adjustment, but I was unsure whether it would be the last time, and besides, my new glasses are about 1/10th the thickness of the old ones, lol...

Actually, it was a miraculous procedure, and an amazing four year run.  As for the long-term consequences, it's been 17 years since my procedure, and my eyes are still very healthy - just a little myopic, with astigmatism and age-related presbyopia starting to become an issue.

I have heard that PRK is considered to be a better option now.  Don't know about LASEK, but anything that avoids the corneal flag can't be a bad thing.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
As you age and your eyes change, would you need it repeated periodically?
That's my concern.  All these young folks getting it done...what's the result going to be in the long run?

I was 20/400 and waited until I was 40 to get LASIK.  I waited because most myopia stops getting worse after that age.  Mine did get worse, and now I wear glasses again.

I could have gotten an adjustment, but I was unsure whether it would be the last time, and besides, my new glasses are about 1/10th the thickness of the old ones, lol...

Actually, it was a miraculous procedure, and an amazing four year run.  As for the long-term consequences, it's been 17 years since my procedure, and my eyes are still very healthy - just a little myopic, with astigmatism and age-related presbyopia starting to become an issue.

I have heard that PRK is considered to be a better option now.  Don't know about LASEK, but anything that avoids the corneal flag can't be a bad thing.

LASEK is a version of PRK.  Instead of removing the bowman layer and having it grow back, they put alcohol in the eye which causes it to debond and slide it to the side and then slide it back in place after the procedure.  If the debonding goes wrong, they do normal PRK.  
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:06:12 PM EDT
[#44]
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He suffered from more than dry eye.
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Quoted:
Quoted:


Dry eye doesn't sound that serious / bad, but it is.

PRK / LASEK reduce the probability of that issue.  You don't cut the cornea, you only remove / slide to the side the bowman layer respectively.



He suffered from more than dry eye.

I read that after posting and did an edit.  I have read account of people killing themselves just from dry eye though.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:15:27 PM EDT
[#45]
First of all, I am laughing at your tag, "#1 spanker of the monkey" and the old joke was that, that would make you go blind.

But on a more serious note...... I had Lasik done on Labor day 2000 (just before my 31st bday).  My vision was 20/425 & 20/450.  My surgery went perfectly and my vision was corrected to 20/15 and 20/20!  However, I did not wear sunglasses like I was supposed to and had to have revision done in 2006.  The doc and I decided to correct my dominant eye back to 20/20 and leave the left at 20/50, because I would most likely develop farsightedness; and we were hoping the mono-vision would prevent me from needing reading glasses.  I caved about two years ago and got reading glasses, which I only need when using the computer (hard-copy print seems fine).  

For the first few years, I did have the "halos" with night vision (mainly headlights), but was easily corrected by wearing lightly tinted sunglasses (non prescription).  I do not need to wear them at night anymore.  My distance vision is still fantastic!  I highly recommend it and TLC (the national company where I had mine done).  They give a lifetime warranty (as long as you have yearly checkups with a TLC affiliated eye doc for the first 10yrs post sx); and did not charge for my revision in 2006.

Additionally, I agree with another post....  NO pain at all!  
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:18:23 PM EDT
[#46]
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Quoted:



Most will still need reading glasses.  I'm at the age where I have to use reading glasses while wearing contacts.  I'm to the point of just switching entirely to glasses with progressive lenses.  I have thought about Lasik, but would prefer to see long term effects, reversing, etc  As we age reading glasses are pretty much a guarantee for most of us, so I just don't see the risk worth the reward.
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As far as long term effects, I believe TLC has been doing this procedure since the late 80's/early 90's?  I did quite a bit of research on it before I had it done in 2000.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:19:54 PM EDT
[#47]
I had PRK done 21 years ago when I was 28 years old.  I had it done overseas before it was even approved by the FDA here in the US.  I was very nearsighted before the surgery and it fixed that.  I lived happily ever after for 20 years until just recently my distance vision started deteriorating again.  I think partly because of looking at computer and phone screens all the time.  I just had an eye exam and now have a mild prescription for glasses for the first time in what seems like forever.  I have to take the glasses off to read or work on the computer though, which is a hassle.  

I had a good run with it and I'm glad I did it, but damn it is nice to see clearly again with the glasses.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:24:25 PM EDT
[#48]
Dont do it. LASIK doesnt correct reading unless you do monovision which you would hate. 

Dont do it. I worked in the lasik business for a few years. 


Dont do it. 


Dont do it. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:25:25 PM EDT
[#49]
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Quoted:
and it's painless.
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Negative Ghost Rider.

Mine was horrible - they had some major complications - couldn't get the cutter locked on - broke blood vessels in my eye (eyeball hickies), horrible pressure afterward for days, uncontrollable watering and discharge - almost blind for 4-6 days afterward...

I had a horrible experience.  They say such a reaction is uncommon - just had to be me.

All my buddies had it at the same place - no issues.

A year and a half later - it's pretty good - some days are clearer than others.  They say it is  20/20 left, 20/15 right.

Would I do it again - NOPE.  Bought "lasik for life" too - free "touch ups" as I age...  Yeah, fuck that.  

My wife took a vid of the whole thing on her phone if you want to see it OP...  I wouldn't watch it if you want to do it.  
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:35:31 PM EDT
[#50]
Had it done 10+ years ago. Would recommend it without hesitation. I paid a little more for a procedure that performed enhanced nomograms of the eye's surface. Walked in 20/400. Walked out 20/15 ??
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