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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/6/2006 9:44:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/6/2006 9:46:32 AM EDT by llanero]
We got some slots authorized and the commander said "you can go if you want".
I've heard rumors that soldiers with 300 APFT scores drop out of the school.
So what I need t know is what makes it so tough and what can one do to prepare for it.
Thanks.

ETA this will be in Ft. Benning.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:26:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:35:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Don't allow an available slot for a .mil school pass you by! Jump on it!



+1 definitely grab a slot.
Also, you are letting yourself get psyched out over some rumors. If you really want to do it, just do it. If you have to second guess yourself, then you arent mentally prepared for the training. If your head isn't in the game, then your body will not be. Having your head in the game is half the battle won.

As for your rumor, guys scoring 300 on the PT test failing means they didn't have their head in the game.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:40:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BIKECOP29:

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Don't allow an available slot for a .mil school pass you by! Jump on it!



+1 definitely grab a slot.
Also, you are letting yourself get psyched out over some rumors. If you really want to do it, just do it. If you have to second guess yourself, then you arent mentally prepared for the training. If your head isn't in the game, then your body will not be. Having your head in the game is half the battle won.

As for your rumor, guys scoring 300 on the PT test failing means they didn't have their head in the game.



Never give up. Keep your head in the game, and have the heart to keep pluging away.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 1:47:01 PM EDT
well... it is harder than airborne school.

just study and bring broken in boots for day 11.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 2:59:57 PM EDT
I finished the 12-mile road march, which is the culminating event with testicular cancer. My left testicle was swollen to about three times it's normal size. I was on a two week, no running, no jumping, no prolonged standing profile prior to that day. (I had to recycle and come back to do the road march with another class.) I graduated on a Thursday. The following Monday, the surgeons removed my left testicle and I began a treatment and recovery program that lasted from July until April and involved another surgery and three months of chemotherapy.

If I could do it under those conditions, you have NO excuse for failure! Do it and don't quit.

Physical stress is only a small portion of Air Assault School. Most of it is mental, either remembering the hand-and-arm signal, making sure to properly check the slingloads, or psyching yourself up enough to overcome the rational fear of heights that most people posess. If you're mentally tough, you can do it. The key to making it through the physical portion is waking up each morning and breathing, because there is littlein the way of physical challenge for anyone who can pass an APFT - even those who have one ball rotting off from the inside.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:03:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 4:54:39 PM EDT
Guys, thanks for helping me out with this lazy internet recon, I appreciate the advice and replies.

LLanero


Originally Posted By OEF_VET:
I finished the 12-mile road march, which is the culminating event with testicular cancer. My left testicle was swollen to about three times it's normal size. I was on a two week, no running, no jumping, no prolonged standing profile prior to that day. (I had to recycle and come back to do the road march with another class.) I graduated on a Thursday. The following Monday, the surgeons removed my left testicle and I began a treatment and recovery program that lasted from July until April and involved another surgery and three months of chemotherapy.

If I could do it under those conditions, you have NO excuse for failure! Do it and don't quit.

Physical stress is only a small portion of Air Assault School. Most of it is mental, either remembering the hand-and-arm signal, making sure to properly check the slingloads, or psyching yourself up enough to overcome the rational fear of heights that most people posess. If you're mentally tough, you can do it. The key to making it through the physical portion is waking up each morning and breathing, because there is littlein the way of physical challenge for anyone who can pass an APFT - even those who have one ball rotting off from the inside.



Now THAT is a motivator!
Thanks, OEF_VET.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 9:53:19 PM EDT
Definitly take the slot!

I think I'm the only person in my unit who wants to go to all types of schools we likely will never get a slot for.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:07:29 PM EDT
Which school?

I actually enjoyed Air Assault school and teased my classmates that it was like being on vacation versus my unit! LOL In some ways, I was not joking!

Not all slots for school are guarntees of getting in. This differs by location of course! It is often not just enough to meet the minimum standards but be in the highest percentage of the candidates attempting to get into school. Many schools will hold a "Hell Day" in which you enjoy some nit gritty PT in the pit for hours to warm you up. Then once you are exhausted the testing starts! If they throw the 12 mile road march run in at that time, you need to be at the front of the pack finishing not just completing it in the minimum time. There will be plenty of other road marches to enjoy also during class.

Besides the physical stuff ad of course repelling, you will have classroom and practical instruction in LZ operations and sling loading. Do NOT pass up the school slot. Be all you can be :)
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:16:58 PM EDT
I got my wings about 7 months ago. I loved the school. Of course I got to go to the Army's only real Air Assault school where you get smoked daily just for the sake of getting smoked for an hour or two.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:48:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tallbill:
I got my wings about 7 months ago. I loved the school. Of course I got to go to the Army's only real Air Assault school where you get smoked daily just for the sake of getting smoked for an hour or two.


Hooah! If you don't graduate from Sabulauski, you're not a true Air Assault soldier.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:31:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 5:32:50 AM EDT by TimJ]
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:37:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:20:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 6:23:13 AM EDT by pathfinder74]
I was never a 300 PT score soldier. NEVER.

I went through when I was still a stupid PFC. Study your book stuff and prepare for the road marches before you go and you'll be fine. It's 50% Army games, 25% smarts, and 25% physical.

I was very pleased with myself having completed that school. It seriously challeneged me on all levels.

A guy in my unit, who was a Ranger before going through EOD school (which means he's both physicall AND academically apt) failed out. Needless to say that stupid little Bullwinkle badge meant that much more to me knowing that.

I ran the 12 mile road march and paid for it. I don't knwo if it was bad fit on my boots, crappy socks, whatever... but I had a blister on the back of my heal that looked like half a tomato. The medic at the finish line put mole skin ON it and told me to put my boot back on. A day or two later the doctor at the TMC had to drain it and it made him happier than I ever could have imagined to be able to do something like that. It was frickn-nasty.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 7:28:08 AM EDT
It was an easy school when I went. A nice break from my unit actually. The thing that knocks out the most people is climbing a rope at the obstacle on zero day. After that it's probably a fear of heights during the rappel phase, then remembering all the little things during the sling load and pathfinder operations phases.
Make sure you can climb a rope, be in decent shape, and get in the midset that you will be smoked occasionally. Nothing big. The roadmarches are all to the basic standard, 6 miles in 1.5 hours, and 12 miles in 3 hours with a light ruck (35 pounds) and rifle. Nothing hard there.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 11:35:49 PM EDT
^^^ OMG look at that terrible repelling form above! I would hve cut the rope if I was the Repel Master aboard the helo! LOL
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:17:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:48:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Recon_by_Fire:
^^^ OMG look at that terrible repelling form above! I would hve cut the rope if I was the Repel Master aboard the helo! LOL



It's an aussie rappel. No "L" shape to that, it's face down. Ever see the movie Universal Soldier? The beginning where they are running down the wall is an aussie rappel on a wall. More fun that way.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:04:24 AM EDT
Do they still teach "free" rappel? Out of a slick the first 2 out had the rope coiled on the deck and someone holding the line, you get in a brake position and jump off the skids. Free fall till the rope pulls tight. Scared the crap out me doing that.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:20:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TimJ:

Originally Posted By Recon_by_Fire:
^^^ OMG look at that terrible repelling form above! I would have cut the rope if I was the Repel Master aboard the helo! LOL



You've never seen an Aussie from a helo before??

The rappel master and I still stay in touch, BTW.





[airborne mafia] There's no such thing as a Rappel Master!@!! [/airborne mafia]




I was never....EVER.... a 300 APFT troop and I had no troubles with the physical portions of Air Assault school (Sabalauski '96, thank you ). Of course, I went to the school as a grunt so I was used to doing most of that stuff already.


The biggest thing that gets people is the obstacle course on the first day. It's the rope climbing on the final obstacle that gets many. Solution: make sure you're physically fit and practice on a similar obstacle course if possible prior to going.

Another thing that gets a lot of people is getting dinged on personal gear inspections. Solution: make sure your shit's clean and serviceable. Consider that the crusty bastards at the school probably have a different perspective on what is or isn't serviceable.

The roadmarches screw a lot of people. They either fail the gutcheck or they lose track of time and get off on their pace. I half ran/ half Airborne shuffled mine. Solution: move your ass and don't get distracted.

Fear of heights. I can tell you right now that I found it inifinitely harder to step off the platform of the rappelling tower than to step out the door of the C-130 at Airborne school. Solution: suck it up. There ain't nothing to it but to do it.


Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:40:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By napalm:

The biggest thing that gets people is the obstacle course on the first day. It's the rope climbing on the final obstacle that gets many. Solution: make sure you're physically fit and practice on a similar obstacle course if possible prior to going.






Are these obstacle courses standardized or are they unique to each school location?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:50:10 PM EDT
AASLT Ft.Sherman Republic of Panama, 1991, was intersting to say the least.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:14:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By llanero:

Originally Posted By napalm:

The biggest thing that gets people is the obstacle course on the first day. It's the rope climbing on the final obstacle that gets many. Solution: make sure you're physically fit and practice on a similar obstacle course if possible prior to going.






Are these obstacle courses standardized or are they unique to each school location?





I honestly couldn't tell you. I only had to work with the one at Fort Campbell. I would imagine many of the obstacles are roughly standardized, but I don't know anything about whether the order or layout itself is standardized.


Anybody else know?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:53:16 AM EDT
Slingload OPS was the toughest for me because it is all memorization of chain counts, and the manner in which to inspect the load. The time constraints are tight, and that places additional stress on you.
As far as the road march, every troop should be able to do 12 lousy miles in 3 hours, and it's the last thing you do, so you will be more than motivated.
My rifle company in Panama used to do a 12 miler every Friday morning. I never thought they were that difficult, unless we tied one on at thye NCO Club on Thursday night :)
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 10:55:37 AM EDT
i didnt think it was any harder than a SOTG work-up. when i went my line company was running 30mi a week and doing an 18mi hump before every 96 so i was ready for it. watch out for the REMFs in your class, they will try to drag you down.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 10:42:53 PM EDT
My mistake, the silohoute does appear to be facing downward. Yeah, I think I heard of that Aussie thing... :) Okay then, get that break off :) j/k

I went to AA back in 1987, our unit was 100% AA so as soon as you got there, they wanted to know when you would be ready for your school slot. A big bonus! Bad part was when I went my two neighbors that I was friends with happened to be cadre at the AA and RIP school (which shared the same compound). Bastards
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 8:13:06 AM EDT
Airborne school's a requirement for RIP, isn't it? Do you learn the air assault techniques at Ranger school? I'm 99% sure about this, but Air Assault can't be substituted for jump school if you want to go to RIP, can it?
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 10:45:17 AM EDT
Unless things have changed in the last three years (and God knows that they may have), you do not have to be jump qualified to attend RIP. Heck, you can go through Ranger School as a "leg" Ranger. And, no, Ranger School does not teach you the same things as Air Assault School. Ranger School is a small unit leadership course, centered around light infantry patrolling techniques. Air Assault School is a course where you learn cetain skills necessary for airmobile operations, such as basic Pathfinder Ops, rigging a slingload, and of course, rappelling from a helicopter. There is no requirement to be either Airborne or Air Assault qualified to attend Ranger School.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 12:47:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/11/2006 4:09:41 AM EDT by Unicorn]
Do you two actually mean RIP, the Ranger Indocrination Program, the course you have to attend prior to being assigned to Batallion, or do you mean the pre-Ranger course (often incorrectly called RIP) that is just for Ranger school? For the real RIP, yes you have to be airborne since you are going to an airborne unit. If you actually mean pre-Ranger, then no. There are a lot of tabbed legs.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 7:45:30 PM EDT
Unicorn,

You're right, I was thinking of "pre-Ranger".
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 11:27:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Don't allow an available slot for a .mil school pass you by! Jump on it!


x2!!!

When I went (class 46-94 @ Ft. Campbell), most of the bolos were during the sling-load phase.

All I have to say is, PAY ATTENTION TO DETAIL! Misrouting of sling legs, etc . . .

Mostly mental I'd say, if you're in decent shape it should be no problem.

I remember during the rappel phase where a guy did a dirt dart impression and bounced like three feet.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:06:03 PM EDT
I attended Air Assault School at Ft. Hood when they still had it there. I was active in the TXARNG on the Counter Drug Program. I took leave and completed the Air Assault School. They always bragged it was tougher than Ft. Campbel. I do know it was tough for me. I had two strikes against me. I was a Captain and I was in the Texas Army National Guard. I caught hell from day one. I just happened to be assigned as a road guard. Any of you who have been road guards know you run twice as much as everyone else. You had that damned ruck with you where ever you went. Happens that I could run. Pack or not I could run most people into the dirt. I remember once while in the Marine Corps, they came in and asked if anyone wanted to run the Marine Corps Marathon. Well, why not. This was three weeks before the Marathon, and I hadn't run any more than three miles at a time. I didn't get a chance to run much more than that in the meantime. I completed the marathon, it hurt alot. Anyway getting back to Air Assault School, we had a couple of females show up. There was no restriction against them attending. School cadre prided themselves on having no female ever making through day one. After our inspection, they dogged us with senseless PT. They were right, the females didn't make it through the first obstacle, the rope climb. I made it through with no demerits and even earned a couple of merits. I was in my mid thirties at the time.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 1:30:32 AM EDT
Funny how every school location says they are the hardest, LOL.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:19:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Recon_by_Fire:
Funny how every school location says they are the hardest, LOL.



Undoubtedly, it was the toughest I ever attended.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:50:23 AM EDT
Both of my drill sargeants that went through air assault always said it was "two weeks that felt like two months" referring to the stress and difficulty. I'd like to be able to get a slot and find out myself but I doubt I'll be offered one...
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:48:47 PM EDT
Are you kidding? It was a joke compared to jump school back in78. I can't believe it's gotten any harder.

Originally Posted By GackMan:
well... it is harder than airborne school.

just study and bring broken in boots for day 11.

Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:53:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Recon_by_Fire:
Funny how every school location says they are the hardest, LOL.



You noticed too?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:10:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By skytrooper78:
Are you kidding? It was a joke compared to jump school back in78. I can't believe it's gotten any harder.

Originally Posted By GackMan:
well... it is harder than airborne school.

just study and bring broken in boots for day 11.




but Airborne scholl might have gotten easier in the last 27 years.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 3:19:43 PM EDT
Go, it’s a great course. I broke my ankle on zero day doing that darn rope some have mentioned. After my ankle got better someone taught me a better rope method and things went much better. Do make sure you can climb a rope after you have done some push-ups. If you pay attention to detail and make sure you know the knots and terms (550 break away) you’ll do just fine. The instructors will make sure you know all the stuff and weren’t bad about students asking questions. I was in great shape when I went, so the last run was just a long run. Don’t bring new boots!
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 3:40:23 PM EDT

terms (550 break away)


550 cord is not used for a break away, 1/4 inch cotton webbing is used. 550 cord has too high a tensile strength, 550 lbs., for a break away. BTW, calling it 550 cord is a MAJOR NO-NO at Air Assault School. It is called Type 3 Nylon. IIRC, 1/4" cotton webbing has a tensile strength of somewhere around 100 lbs., maybe 110. (It has been nearly nine years since I really thought about it.)
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 5:31:01 PM EDT
OEF_VET is right….do not use the term 550 cord for the nylon “stuff” and don’t use it for break away. I should have clarified that in the parenthesis.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 4:32:24 AM EDT
I too, never scored 300 on a PT test, but was able to make thru OK. Study your ass off in phase two--I saw an SF major with ranger, pathfinder, scuba, airborne, and CIB tabs flunk out when he couldn't find all the gigs on the A22 bag. Practice climbing a rope and road marching, really, it's not that bad.

Never turn down a school!!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 5:32:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 5:33:27 AM EDT by Sylvan]
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:46:32 PM EDT
That is where I went, Schofield Barracks. 5.5 years in the same unit!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:59:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 8:00:47 PM EDT by Rakky]
PIECE OF CAKE!!! Went when I was in the 3/187 at Campbell. Hell, a really, really good buddy of mine got a Day 0 drop because he showed up still drunk from the night before the day the repelling phase started. And he'd shown up like that quite a few times prior, he never had a problem.

Staying awake in the first few days of class was the hardest part. Physical part was a joke. The slingload part can get confusing, seems like that's the part most people had trouble mastering.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 9:06:34 PM EDT
Rakky,

When were you with Iron? I spent 97-02 as an FO with 3/320 FA, supporting 187. I toured Kosovo with A/1-187 and then went to the 'Stan as Asst BDE Fire Spt NCO with HHC/BDE. During my time, I was attached to every company in Raider, and all but Bravo in Leader.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 9:14:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By OEF_VET:
Rakky,

When were you with Iron? I spent 97-02 as an FO with 3/320 FA, supporting 187. I toured Kosovo with A/1-187 and then went to the 'Stan as Asst BDE Fire Spt NCO with HHC/BDE. During my time, I was attached to every company in Raider, and all but Bravo in Leader.



95-97, just missed ya!
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