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Posted: 4/18/2017 9:14:48 AM EDT
I've got a 25 Mbps fiber optic ISP, and use a dual band Netgear R6250 wireless router for wifi in my home. My home is ~2,400 sq ft 3 bedroom split level house, and the router is in the office which is eastern most room of the house (it's about 50' to the other side of the house).

My router emits two signals - a 5 Ghz signal and 2.4 Ghz signal. The 5 Ghz signal barely escapes the room the router is in, but I can get the 2.4 Ghz signal all over my house, although it weakens due to all the walls. I installed some Netgear EX2700 wifi range extenders in a few key areas in my house (basement and upstairs) to boost the 2.4 Ghz signal, and the signal is clearly stronger (full bars versus half) in the areas near them. 

When I speed test my internet connection on my PC (hardwired to the router) I get ~25 Mbps, and when I speed test on a wireless device (phone or tablet) in the same room as the router I get ~25 Mbps (whether I'm on the 5 Ghz or 2.4 Ghz signal). But the moment I step out of the office and speed test the 2.4 Ghz signal my speed plummets to ~3 Mbps. Since the 2.4 Ghz signal outside the office is only putting out ~3 Mbps the wifi extenders are only emitting that slower speed. 

So what gives? How come my 2.4 Ghz signal's speed plummets so dramatically such a short distance from the router? Is there anyway (some setting, etc.) to keep the speed up? Surfing the net, downloading, etc. on my PC is great with ~25 Mbps speed, but streaming movies (Netflix, etc.), gaming, web browsing, etc. on our phones or tablets connected to the wifi signal anywhere else in the house sucks and is slow.  
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:23:07 AM EDT
I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:25:33 AM EDT
I am so tempted to get that new mesh system that's coming out from several makers. There's a netgear one for $500 at Costco. I have signal issues also and my house is all brick/5k sqft. 
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:29:15 AM EDT
I had a similar problem, but it was any device on the 2.4ghz band, and best I could tell it was from that band congestion with neighboring houses and whatnot.

Download wifi analyzer for your mobile device and you can use that to get more details on your signal in different area and whatnot
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:29:46 AM EDT
Tagged for answers.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:56:57 AM EDT
Not a huge network guy but that is pretty weird. I had Fios for a while and the wifi was terrible. The router I was provided gave out 80% mbps less than hardwired. Generally, hardwired is the best option, and you will see some loss of speed going to Wifi. However, with extenders, I would imagine that you should not have too much of an issue.

Did you check for compatibility prior to purchase? I know that certain devices will only allow a certain amount of speed and the devices need to be matched up for what you are wanting to accomplish. If you have not already checked for compatibility, I would do so.

I apologize I cannot speak in less broad terms but my knowledge of network is limited. Good luck.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:08:36 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Not a huge network guy but that is pretty weird. I had Fios for a while and the wifi was terrible. The router I was provided gave out 80% mbps less than hardwired. Generally, hardwired is the best option, and you will see some loss of speed going to Wifi. However, with extenders, I would imagine that you should not have too much of an issue.

Did you check for compatibility prior to purchase? I know that certain devices will only allow a certain amount of speed and the devices need to be matched up for what you are wanting to accomplish. If you have not already checked for compatibility, I would do so.

I apologize I cannot speak in less broad terms but my knowledge of network is limited. Good luck.
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Thanks. Yes, the wifi extenders are compatible with my router (same manufacturer also).
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:13:16 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
View Quote
This.  When you use "Extenders" you are using are splitting the range and using the original wifi as the backhaul.  It's not truly extending.  Look at these powerline injectors that use your homes power wires to distribute the ethernet to the built in access points.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:13:29 AM EDT
Just to clarify, the wifi extenders aren't the problem. They are extending the 2.4 Ghz signal at 3 Mbps, which is the speed of the signal reaching where they are located. The root problem is the 2.4 Ghz signal that my router is emitting is ~25 Mbps in the same room as the router, but step one foot outside the door (so there now is a wall between the router and the device) and the signal drops to ~3 Mbps. 

Also, this problem is fairly new, even though we have had the router abut 15-18 months. My family and I just started noticing the much slower speeds throughout the house a few weeks ago. Before that it was fine. 
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:16:46 AM EDT
Try relocating your router.  

Just moving mine about 10 feet in the same room made a big difference throughout my entire house.

Reboot it and your modem.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:19:58 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
View Quote
Range isn't so much the problem, or at least I don't think it is. The 2.4 Ghz signal can be received pretty far from the router (all throughout the house), but the signal does weaken the further you get from the router (i.e. in the same room as the router you might get 100% reception, but on the far end of the house it drops to 50%-75%. The problem I'm experiencing is that the speed that signal provides in the same room as the router is the same speed as my FIOS, but step outside that room and the speed drops by almost 90%. Maybe that is a range problem (e.g. weaker signal translates to slower speed), but I just can't believe the speed should be dropping that significantly such a short distance from the router. 
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:22:39 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Try relocating your router.  

Just moving mine about 10 feet in the same room made a big difference throughout my entire house.

Reboot it and your modem.
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Can't, unfortunately. The cable for the FIOS enters my house in SE corner of the office and where my PC is located, due to the configuration of the office (built in shelving on one wall, wood burning stove on another, et.), it's the only place the router can be (without having the FIOS company back out at my expense to re-wire so I can place the cable and router in another room). 
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:23:06 AM EDT
When you step outside your room, are you connected to the main router or the extender?  This will make a difference.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:36:02 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Can't, unfortunately. The cable for the FIOS enters my house in SE corner of the office and where my PC is located, due to the configuration of the office (built in shelving on one wall, wood burning stove on another, et.), it's the only place the router can be (without having the FIOS company back out at my expense to re-wire so I can place the cable and router in another room). 
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Try relocating your router.  

Just moving mine about 10 feet in the same room made a big difference throughout my entire house.

Reboot it and your modem.
Can't, unfortunately. The cable for the FIOS enters my house in SE corner of the office and where my PC is located, due to the configuration of the office (built in shelving on one wall, wood burning stove on another, et.), it's the only place the router can be (without having the FIOS company back out at my expense to re-wire so I can place the cable and router in another room). 
Why can't you just run an ethernet cable (of any length up to 300') from your FIOS modem to your router wherever you want to put it?  There's no rule that says your modem and router have to be in the same place.

With that said, I wouldn't move your router.  I'd buy another wireless access point, place it on the other side of your house or wherever you need coverage and run an Ethernet cable back to wherever your original router is to connect it.    That's the robust way to do it.  

Powerline Wireless Access Points will also work but it's less robust.  In my experience, anything other than hardwire ethernet is going to cost you something in terms of performance.  

I've never had any luck with repeaters/extenders.  I think they are a rubbish way to solve a coverage problem.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:39:26 AM EDT
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Can't, unfortunately. The cable for the FIOS enters my house in SE corner of the office and where my PC is located, due to the configuration of the office (built in shelving on one wall, wood burning stove on another, et.), it's the only place the router can be (without having the FIOS company back out at my expense to re-wire so I can place the cable and router in another room). 
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Does it use Cat 5 from the FIOS to the router?

Leave the FIOS where it's at.

Get (2) 50' or 100' pieces of Cat 5 cable.  

Run it along the bottom of the wall and shelving.

One piece from FIOS to router and the other going back from router to PC.

Even if it's not a permanent fix you want to at least check to see if moving the router helps.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:41:40 AM EDT
I would only use one extender, and make sure it is in a location that still gets a good signal from the router (this is the biggest mistake I see people make with extenders; you need the extender to have an excellent wifi connection to the router or the performance will be terrible).  Also, try channels 1, 6, and 11 on the router's 2.4ghz radio.  If you still can't get wifi working at 25 mbps after that, you probably have a ton of interference.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:46:01 AM EDT
the 2.4 spectrum is very crowded, so make sure you're not using the same channels as other 2.4 networks.  if your wireless router is set to auto select channel and dB strength, try pinning to specific channels that you know are free, and try stepping up the power incrementally.

The 5 gig spectrum is less congested right now, but the range isn't as good as 2.4.  

If you have in-wall insulation (sound batts, etc) on the interior of your home, it will have a dramatic impact on your signal strength, regardless of which spectrum you use.

I have a 5k sqft home with 2 ubiquiti unifi APs, and I will probably get a 3rd due to the in-wall insulation I have.  I highly recommend the ubiquiti stuff fwiw.  (I'm on my third vendor, and it is working great)
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:46:33 AM EDT
What you seek is a wireless access point. Had the same issue in my house.

Check out the Ubiquiti AC Pro. It basically plugs into your router, you hardwire it to the location in which you are having conncection issues, and it creates a new wireless network. With my Ubiquiti i'm seeing very fast speeds, much faster than my normal wireless speeds.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:46:42 AM EDT
That router sucks.  Get a Netgear Nighthawk x6 or x4s.  You won't need extenders afterwards.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:47:49 AM EDT
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Quoted:
When you step outside your room, are you connected to the main router or the extender?  This will make a difference.
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Main.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:49:06 AM EDT
What is the composition of your walls? Plaster walls destroy signal strength. The 2.4 ghz will always extend further than the 5. What channel are you operating on?
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:51:16 AM EDT
Extenders really hurt performance as it has to retransmit on the same frequency essentially doubling the traffic, in your case since you have more than one it's even worse.  They are generally to be avoided at all cost.  You could try turning them off to see if that's what you're running into.  As mentioned the correct way to extend range is hardwire other APs to the main router, use the same ssid/security and run them all on different channels 1, 6 or 11 only.  You could look at using powerline adapters (uses your power runs for networking) if you can't run the cable.

Proper positioning of the antennas is key, they should be straight up and down.  Never "point" antennas at each other as that is the worst reception/attentuation.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:00:56 AM EDT
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What is the composition of your walls? Plaster walls destroy signal strength. The 2.4 ghz will always extend further than the 5. What channel are you operating on?
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Internal walls are drywall...uninsulated.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:05:01 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Extenders really hurt performance as it has to retransmit on the same frequency essentially doubling the traffic, in your case since you have more than one it's even worse.  They are generally to be avoided at all cost.  You could try turning them off to see if that's what you're running into. As mentioned the correct way to extend range is hardwire other APs to the main router, use the same ssid/security and run them all on different channels 1, 6 or 11 only.  You could look at using powerline adapters (uses your power runs for networking) if you can't run the cable.

Proper positioning of the antennas is key, they should be straight up and down.  Never "point" antennas at each other as that is the worst reception/attentuation.
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Will try that when I get home.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:08:35 AM EDT
All consumer-based WiFi products SUCK, SUCK, SUCK.....So you have two choices...

1: Stick with said consumer-based products (but don't overspend,) but go with something that can support Tomato or DD-WRT. Might want to go with a mesh setup but will require a bit of networking knowledge or help (GD could easily be an asset here.)
2: Step up to a prosumer or light commercial stuff like Ubit from Ubiqiti or a used Cisco/Aruba/Sputnik device(s.) Problem is this options WILL require more than a basic knowledge of networking but again this site has a lot of knowledgeable folks to assist.


I'm a big fan of Ubiquiti AP's but to do it right you need at least two or three depending on the layout of your house. All tied into a central router/firewall device (Ubit's security gateway or a used Cisco PIX is great.) Really want to get fancy, Cable modem > Security Gateway > Managed Power over Ethernet switch > Ubit AP's.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:14:50 AM EDT
If you are going to run the "50-100" foot ethernet cable option, use cat 6. Longer ethernet cables is better suited with cat 6. Cat 5 is normally good enough but at those ranges, I would use cat 6.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:16:52 AM EDT
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Quoted:
If you are going to run the "50-100" foot ethernet cable option, use cat 6. Longer ethernet cables is better suited with cat 6. Cat 5 is normally good enough but at those ranges, I would use cat 6.
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Absolutely, no reason to NOT run CAT6......
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:16:55 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
All consumer-based WiFi products SUCK, SUCK, SUCK.....So you have two choices...

1: Stick with said consumer-based products (but don't overspend,) but go with something that can support Tomato or DD-WRT. Might want to go with a mesh setup but will require a bit of networking knowledge or help (GD could easily be an asset here.)
2: Step up to a prosumer or light commercial stuff like Ubit from Ubiqiti or a used Cisco/Aruba/Sputnik device(s.) Problem is this options WILL require more than a basic knowledge of networking but again this site has a lot of knowledgeable folks to assist.


I'm a big fan of Ubiquiti AP's but to do it right you need at least two or three depending on the layout of your house. All tied into a central router/firewall device (Ubit's security gateway or a used Cisco PIX is great.) Really want to get fancy, Cable modem > Security Gateway > Managed Power over Ethernet switch > Ubit AP's.
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I flashed my router with DD-WRT years ago, best money I never spent . I spent 50 bucks on a router and flashed it and now I have options that are only available on 300 dollar routers.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:19:44 AM EDT
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Quoted:


I flashed my router with DD-WRT years ago, best money I never spent . I spent 50 bucks on a router and flashed it and now I have options that are only available on 300 dollar routers.
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Yep, I ran DD-WRT since the days of old Linksys but there's better options today. While DD-WRT/Tomato gives you some great software options, you're still limited by shit hardware namely lack of memory, faster processors and of course power-supply/antennas/range.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:22:14 AM EDT
5 Ghz is better but it don't penetrate walls well.  2.4 Ghz penetrates walls better but there are way too many things the interfere inside the frequency band.  

I suggest you add wireless access points to extend you wireless range.  Use a good old fashioned wire to connect them back to your network.

EDIT: Even 2.4 Ghz loses 20% of it's signal for every wall it has to pass through.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:25:33 AM EDT
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Absolutely, no reason to NOT run CAT6......
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If you are going to run the "50-100" foot ethernet cable option, use cat 6. Longer ethernet cables is better suited with cat 6. Cat 5 is normally good enough but at those ranges, I would use cat 6.
Absolutely, no reason to NOT run CAT6......
CAT5 is good for what CAT5 does up to 200'.  But I agree you may as well run CAT6.  When you get in to Gigabit speeds you really want CAT6.  The cost difference is minimal.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:28:03 AM EDT
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Can't, unfortunately. The cable for the FIOS enters my house in SE corner of the office and where my PC is located, due to the configuration of the office (built in shelving on one wall, wood burning stove on another, et.), it's the only place the router can be (without having the FIOS company back out at my expense to re-wire so I can place the cable and router in another room). 
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Oh, fiber optic cable. I don't know.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:29:23 AM EDT
One issue could be that since you have overlapping signals from different devices broadcasting the same SSID, you may be connecting to the extender on the other side of the house.

Plenty of free utilities that will tell you the MAC address of the SSID you're connected to. This information can be correlated to the MAC address on the FCC sticker of each WiFi extender/router.

Check out (Windows):
-Kismet
-NetSpot
-InSSIDER

If youre on a Mac, hold down the Option key and click the WiFi signal...it will show the you MAC address you're connected to.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:35:13 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:37:39 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Yep, I ran DD-WRT since the days of old Linksys but there's better options today. While DD-WRT/Tomato gives you some great software options, you're still limited by shit hardware namely lack of memory, faster processors and of course power-supply/antennas/range.
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Quoted:
Quoted:


I flashed my router with DD-WRT years ago, best money I never spent . I spent 50 bucks on a router and flashed it and now I have options that are only available on 300 dollar routers.
Yep, I ran DD-WRT since the days of old Linksys but there's better options today. While DD-WRT/Tomato gives you some great software options, you're still limited by shit hardware namely lack of memory, faster processors and of course power-supply/antennas/range.
The government intentionally limits the range of wireless.  In fact Obama wanted to outlaw DD-WRT because you can increase the transmitter power and increase the range.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:40:25 AM EDT
Replace everything with Ubiquiti
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:43:28 AM EDT
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I would only use one extender, and make sure it is in a location that still gets a good signal from the router (this is the biggest mistake I see people make with extenders; you need the extender to have an excellent wifi connection to the router or the performance will be terrible).  Also, try channels 1, 6, and 11 on the router's 2.4ghz radio.  If you still can't get wifi working at 25 mbps after that, you probably have a ton of interference.
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This. Never leave the router on Auto. As some other posts said you need to download a wifi analyzer to your laptop or Android device (doesn't work on iOS) and see which of those three channels is the weakest in your house. Then choose that one for your router. Turn off the repeaters when you test this. Turn your routers 2.4 band to 802.11N only, I doubt you have any G devices anymore.

Also 5ghz isn't as strong as 2.4 but it should be fine through a couple walls. I'm tempted to say something is screwy with your router. You on the latest firmware from Netgear? A full reset might not be a bad idea either.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:44:10 AM EDT
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Quoted:
The government intentionally limits the range of wireless.  In fact Obama wanted to outlaw DD-WRT because you can increase the transmitter power and increase the range.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:


I flashed my router with DD-WRT years ago, best money I never spent . I spent 50 bucks on a router and flashed it and now I have options that are only available on 300 dollar routers.
Yep, I ran DD-WRT since the days of old Linksys but there's better options today. While DD-WRT/Tomato gives you some great software options, you're still limited by shit hardware namely lack of memory, faster processors and of course power-supply/antennas/range.
The government intentionally limits the range of wireless.  In fact Obama wanted to outlaw DD-WRT because you can increase the transmitter power and increase the range.
oh my god.  Just stop pontificating about things you don't understand.

It's not Obama's fault.  There are regulations on the use of the airwaves.  There always will be, otherwise people would simply slap a 50 watt transmitter on their WAP and drown the entire spectrum, all channels, and no one else would be able to use wifi anywhere within a mile.

The FCC owns the spectrum.  You use it, you follow their rules.  The firmware builds that allow you to raise the output power past legal levels can get you fined -- using them that way is already illegal, they don't have to outlaw it again to make it illegal.  

BTW, the government does not limit the range of wireless.  They limit the transmit power.  Those two are not the same thing.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:44:47 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
View Quote
Sorry I hope I'm not derailing this thread to much, but would these powerline adapters work from the house to a shop/metal building? My shop is tied in to the house breaker box with 6ga underground. So plug in access point to wifi router in house, and plug in another in the shop? Sorry this is another area than I'm pretty clueless, but I'd like to get some wifi in the shop as well.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:45:59 AM EDT
I think what is happening is that the wifi in the room with the router is on the 802.11/n band and the extenders are using protocol 802.11/g.  If your main router has 2 omni antennas and your range extender only has a single, this could be your problem.  Ranger extenders do not extend range.  They create a sub-net of your existing home network and connect that geographically seperated sub-net via radio to your main home network.  You can get mixed hardware to work perfectly fine, but if you are on a slow node, it will be slow.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:46:48 AM EDT
Ubiquiti AP-LR is your answer
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:49:07 AM EDT
I'm ignoring every other answer to say run a wire to the other side of the house. Place an AP there with the same SSID as the other one.

Done.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:49:49 AM EDT
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Sorry I hope I'm not derailing this thread to much, but would these powerline adapters work from the house to a shop/metal building? My shop is tied in to the house breaker box with 6ga underground. So plug in access point to wifi router in house, and plug in another in the shop? Sorry this is another area than I'm pretty clueless, but I'd like to get some wifi in the shop as well.
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How long is your cable to the shop?
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:50:18 AM EDT
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Quoted:
This.  When you use "Extenders" you are using are splitting the range and using the original wifi as the backhaul.  It's not truly extending.  Look at these powerline injectors that use your homes power wires to distribute the ethernet to the built in access points.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
This.  When you use "Extenders" you are using are splitting the range and using the original wifi as the backhaul.  It's not truly extending.  Look at these powerline injectors that use your homes power wires to distribute the ethernet to the built in access points.
What you want is your ISP connection going to a router via ethernet.
Powerline adapter connected via ethernet to main router.
Second powerline adapter going to another wifi router via ethernet.
Second wifi router broadcasting your same SSID, but on another channel at other end or level of house.

This way you effectively have a single network backbone coming in from ISP to all your routers, with each broadcasting same SSID but on different channels.
I do this on a larger scale over 10 acres, using point to point wifi bridges to connect backbone out to different buildings.

Adding another bridge and access point to another building this week.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:51:56 AM EDT
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Absolutely, no reason to NOT run CAT6......
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If you are going to run the "50-100" foot ethernet cable option, use cat 6. Longer ethernet cables is better suited with cat 6. Cat 5 is normally good enough but at those ranges, I would use cat 6.
Absolutely, no reason to NOT run CAT6......
This.  The big cost of running cable is your time or some other guy's time.  Always use the best cable available every time.  I wired my house with CAT6 over 12 years ago now to each room and I've never had the problem of obsolescence as a result.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:54:15 AM EDT
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I think what is happening is that the wifi in the room with the router is on the 802.11/n band and the extenders are using protocol 802.11/g.  If your main router has 2 omni antennas and your range extender only has a single, this could be your problem.  Ranger extenders do not extend range.  They create a sub-net of your existing home network and connect that geographically seperated sub-net via radio to your main home network.  You can get mixed hardware to work perfectly fine, but if you are on a slow node, it will be slow.
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THIS. That is what I was trying to get across but my knowledge of network suuuuuuuuuuuucks
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:56:53 AM EDT
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The government intentionally limits the range of wireless.  In fact Obama wanted to outlaw DD-WRT because you can increase the transmitter power and increase the range.
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Yes I know, what happened when you increased the power on your unit? It would break very shortly; not designed or built for it.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:59:45 AM EDT
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Ubiquiti AP-LR is your answer
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Yep. Pop one of these on the ceiling and run a wire back to router.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:12:19 PM EDT
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Sorry I hope I'm not derailing this thread to much, but would these powerline adapters work from the house to a shop/metal building? My shop is tied in to the house breaker box with 6ga underground. So plug in access point to wifi router in house, and plug in another in the shop? Sorry this is another area than I'm pretty clueless, but I'd like to get some wifi in the shop as well.
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I have a 2-story house smaller than yours and a decent wireless router (Asus, dual channel), I still needed more range for the far side of my house.  

I picked up this set of powerline adapters with a built-in Access Point, and put the AP at the opposite end of the house. It's worked much better than expected for months now.
Sorry I hope I'm not derailing this thread to much, but would these powerline adapters work from the house to a shop/metal building? My shop is tied in to the house breaker box with 6ga underground. So plug in access point to wifi router in house, and plug in another in the shop? Sorry this is another area than I'm pretty clueless, but I'd like to get some wifi in the shop as well.
Powerline adapters only work if they are on same power circuit. I doubt they would work across to another building.
You need a point to point wireless bridge between buildings.

https://www.engeniustech.com/outdoor-wireless-bridges.html
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:46:52 PM EDT
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I think what is happening is that the wifi in the room with the router is on the 802.11/n band and the extenders are using protocol 802.11/g. If your main router has 2 omni antennas and your range extender only has a single, this could be your problem.  Ranger extenders do not extend range.  They create a sub-net of your existing home network and connect that geographically seperated sub-net via radio to your main home network.  You can get mixed hardware to work perfectly fine, but if you are on a slow node, it will be slow.
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How would I verify this? 
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