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10/30/2020 2:42:12 PM
Posted: 2/24/2016 3:27:29 PM EST
sitting at Denver airport waiting for a 4 hour delayed flight and was wondering, it appears jets taxi with just 1 engine running. over time I would assume this leads to significant number of additional hours on 1 engine versus the other. Do they always taxi with the same engine running or does it alternate? pilots choice? do both engines get PM at the same time regardless of hours on each if they are significantly different?
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:37:18 PM EST
Engines will get overhauled when they reach a certain time it doesn't matter it's position.  You may have one engine with twice the time of the other on the plane.  On the MD80 we start the left engine because of the nature of the hyd system.  Other planes may be different.  Same thing with taxing in, we shut down the right engine.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:41:44 PM EST
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Originally Posted By agriebel:
Engines will get overhauled when they reach a certain time it doesn't matter it's position.  You may have one engine with twice the time of the other on the plane.  On the MD80 we start the left engine because of the nature of the hyd system.  Other planes may be different.  Same thing with taxing in, we shut down the right engine.
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interesting. wouldn't it be more efficient to do both engines when it's pulled from service?
NVM. dumb question. 4 years of flying 40+ weeks a year has shown me the airlines don't give a shit about efficiency nor common sense.

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Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:43:31 PM EST
It depends on the company. Some companies taxi out on one engine more than others then ask where to do a cross bleed start on their way out to the runways. Some will taxi out o n one engine if they know they're going to be sitting for a while waiting for a flow/EDCT time then ask for a heads up so they can get both ready when it's go time.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:44:32 PM EST
The time between overhauls for a turbine engine on an airliner is tens of thousands of hours. Idling an engine unnecessarily burns a lot of gas, so many operators avoid it if possible.



Even for maintenance taxis, we usually only have one engine running, unless the weather conditions are bad or we are taking it to an engine run-up pad to pull more power.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:44:45 PM EST
They have another engine waiting and just swap it out.  They can change an engine really fast.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:48:57 PM EST
Why does the Dash 8 use one engine for takeoff?
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:50:25 PM EST

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Originally Posted By 03PSD:

wouldn't it be more efficient to do both engines when it's pulled from service?



4 years of flying 40+ weeks a year has shown me the airlines don't give a shit about efficiency nor common sense.



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On a Boeing 737, it takes three or four mechanics about 8 hours to change an engine. The airplane is brought into the hangar in the evening, the old engine gets pulled off and a new one gets put on. The airplane may well be out flying people around the next morning.



For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.



 
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:52:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Why does the Dash 8 use one engine for takeoff?
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I read somewhere that all modern commercial jets are capable of single engine take offs with typical  load of passengers and cargo/fuel. not sure it's true but makes sense in case of a blown motor during take off.


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Link Posted: 2/24/2016 3:54:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:


For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.
 
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Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:
Originally Posted By 03PSD:
wouldn't it be more efficient to do both engines when it's pulled from service?

4 years of flying 40+ weeks a year has shown me the airlines don't give a shit about efficiency nor common sense.



For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.
 


raleigh to Newark via midway makes no sense.


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Link Posted: 2/24/2016 4:01:29 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:
On a Boeing 737, it takes three or four mechanics about 8 hours to change an engine. The airplane is brought into the hangar in the evening, the old engine gets pulled off and a new one gets put on. The airplane may well be out flying people around the next morning.

For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.
 
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Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:
Originally Posted By 03PSD:
wouldn't it be more efficient to do both engines when it's pulled from service?

4 years of flying 40+ weeks a year has shown me the airlines don't give a shit about efficiency nor common sense.

On a Boeing 737, it takes three or four mechanics about 8 hours to change an engine. The airplane is brought into the hangar in the evening, the old engine gets pulled off and a new one gets put on. The airplane may well be out flying people around the next morning.

For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.
 


03, you have no idea how efficient the Airlines are.  Decades cut throat competition since "deregulation" has forced them to raise efficiency to an Art, and a science.      

Common sense, yeah, that's not always evident.    

Even from within the belly of the beast, we often can't see the big picture.    For you to think you've somehow absorbed special insight from sitting in 32B?       Well, that's just silly.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 4:02:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2016 4:05:40 PM EST by Gingerbreadman]


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Originally Posted By 03PSD:
raleigh to Newark via midway makes no sense.


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Originally Posted By 03PSD:





Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:




Originally Posted By 03PSD:


wouldn't it be more efficient to do both engines when it's pulled from service?





4 years of flying 40+ weeks a year has shown me the airlines don't give a shit about efficiency nor common sense.











For the most part, efficiency=money, and they do care about it quite a bit. The two or three hour snippet of time that you spend on the plane is just a fraction of the story.


 






raleigh to Newark via midway makes no sense.


Same plane? Anybody get on or off partway through? Hub and spoke routing works by connecting smaller markets through one big one. You wouldn't be able to fill a plane only with passengers who want a direct flight between Raleigh and Newark, but you can easily fill that same plane out of Raleigh with passengers who want to go to Dallas, Miami, Denver, and Newark.





 
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 4:08:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 03PSD:


I read somewhere that all modern commercial jets are capable of single engine take offs with typical  load of passengers and cargo/fuel. not sure it's true but makes sense in case of a blown motor during take off.


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Originally Posted By 03PSD:
Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Why does the Dash 8 use one engine for takeoff?


I read somewhere that all modern commercial jets are capable of single engine take offs with typical  load of passengers and cargo/fuel. not sure it's true but makes sense in case of a blown motor during take off.


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It's called V1.   About 130-155 mph.    Lose an engine above that, and you're still going flying.    Much below that, and the full power engine will swerve you off the runway, if you don't pull it back pdq.    

Given a long enough runway, and a light enough airplane, some could probably accelerate slowly to V1 and take off with one engine.    But it isn't something we practice, for obvious reasons.
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 5:35:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2016 5:37:15 PM EST by katrina24]
It's   way fun   to see  B-52's    injected  water  black smoke take-offs  watching    them from a taxiway on a 12,000 ft plus runway  in a crash & rescue  fire truck   .  not only was it ear popping   it would shake your chest,,,,,  and when  they scrambled   six  in a row......   it left you  proud   that America  built  that.......

          Seen a lot of  .. off  debark side  engines left running   on many military aircraft
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 5:39:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Why does the Dash 8 use one engine for takeoff?
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As opposed to not using it for takeoff?  Seriously though, the Dash 8 uses both engines for takeoff.

Mike
E-9A
Link Posted: 2/24/2016 6:47:48 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Mike_c130:


As opposed to not using it for takeoff?  Seriously though, the Dash 8 uses both engines for takeoff.

Mike
E-9A
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Originally Posted By Mike_c130:
Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Why does the Dash 8 use one engine for takeoff?


As opposed to not using it for takeoff?  Seriously though, the Dash 8 uses both engines for takeoff.

Mike
E-9A


This. I've seen a lot of Dash 8s depart
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