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Posted: 1/8/2005 8:13:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 8:14:16 PM EDT by Penguin_101]
[rant]
I went to Target one hour to drop film off for reprints. I went, paid, left. I then get home and open it up to put the film from Christmas back and the film is MESSED up!:
<-- There was the end of the roll that is GONE!
No one told me ANYTHING AND I PAID FOR IT! (I did get prints)
So I went back and there was someone else. "I can't fix this and print anymore. I don't know how it happened." Then I left knowing that ALL film will be going to my pro lab and I will NEVER return to there again.

[/rant]
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:15:44 PM EDT
You're a photo guru too, right? I figured you'd have checked the prints prior to leaving the counter.

Sorry to hear about it.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:16:13 PM EDT
Get thee on thy steed and acquire thee a magnificent digicam!
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:16:24 PM EDT
go digital and print your own
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:17:32 PM EDT
film?

j/k i dont miss having film developed one bit.
time to upgrade, save yourself the inevitable headaches.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:17:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:18:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 8:20:18 PM EDT by Penguin_101]

Originally Posted By Ramennoodlesoup:
Get thee on thy steed and acquire thee a magnificent digicam!



Already have digital and about $700 in digital equipment. I just like film, and it is cheaper until digital goes down. I also know that film will last at least 100 years, where there is a major risk in digital.

Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:19:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:
You're a photo guru too, right? I figured you'd have checked the prints prior to leaving the counter.

Sorry to hear about it.



I did check the prints, I just didn't think they would ruin the -'s.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:23:13 PM EDT
OR take your digital pics to the store on a disk and have them print the digital images from your disk onto photo paper. That way you still have a copy of your digital file... Plus you have the archival quality of the true photo paper.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:24:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By watersniper:
OR take your digital pics to the store on a disk and have them print the digital images from your disk onto photo paper. That way you still have a copy of your digital file... Plus you have the archival quality of the true photo paper.


That would ruin the point to me.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:26:01 PM EDT
Penguin_101: Sorry you lost your negatives, I usually check my order before I leave the film counter, you never know when those people will make a mistake. The Target in-store photofinishing is run by Kodak.

I too am still using film, but I find that for family snapshots, digital is the way to go. You just burn your images on the a CD-RW, and take it down to the photofinisher and they print on nice photographic paper.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:28:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:28:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:
Penguin_101: Sorry you lost your negatives, I usually check my order before I leave the film counter, you never know when those people will make a mistake. The Target in-store photofinishing is run by Kodak.

I too am still using film, but I find that for family snapshots, digital is the way to go. You just burn your images on the a CD-RW, and take it down to the photofinisher and they print on nice photographic paper.



I use digital for those too. I guess it would help if I said that the camera was brand new and I had to use it.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:29:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheTacticalSolution:

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
I also know that film will last at least 100 years, where there is a major risk in digital.




1's & 0's last forever. What is the risk?



HD fails, images are gone.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:30:31 PM EDT
Backed up on disk.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:32:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zombievt:
Backed up on disk.



They last a few years. www.itl.nist.gov/div895/preservation/
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:37:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:

Originally Posted By zombievt:
Backed up on disk.



They last a few years. www.itl.nist.gov/div895/preservation/


I called Sony and asked them what is the life span of a CD/DVD and the guy goes, "they're rated for a minimum of 25 years, but since they are so new, no one really knows how long they will last.

I too backup all of my important stuff to a DVD/CD-RW to protect against accidental deletion.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:17:16 AM EDT
I can't tell for sure from that small image what the problem is.

I think I see torn sprocket holes (almost always the camera or camera users fault)

The bottom edge of the strip looks mangled, I'd have a better idea of how it happened if I actually had the strip in front of me.

I think I see odd scratches on the second frame (poor handling of the film by the lab)

My best guess is that the strip got caught in an auto advance either in their printer or their negative sleeving machine and in their efforts to get it unjammed they mutilated it and instead of bucking up and telling the cusotmer there was a problem they stuffed it into the package and hopped no one would notice.

You didn't get all of your negatives back? (The lab should have a way to find them, there were jobs being done at the same time and your negatives are most likely in one of them, the lab should check the jobs and if needed call the customers who have already picked up their work and ask them to please check and offer a freebie to them as incentive to return the negatives to the lab)


Face it though, the workers in Targets One hour lab aren't photofinishers, last week they were probably in charge of stocking feminine hygiene products. They're just monkeys who are pushing buttons on machines that they know nothing about.

Professional Labs will make goofs and screw ups too, trust me on this it's what I do for a living, and we do screw up. Almost anything, with some major exceptions, can be fixed to some extent though and the attitude you recieved was
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:11:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
I can't tell for sure from that small image what the problem is.

I think I see torn sprocket holes (almost always the camera or camera users fault)

The bottom edge of the strip looks mangled, I'd have a better idea of how it happened if I actually had the strip in front of me.

I think I see odd scratches on the second frame (poor handling of the film by the lab)

My best guess is that the strip got caught in an auto advance either in their printer or their negative sleeving machine and in their efforts to get it unjammed they mutilated it and instead of bucking up and telling the cusotmer there was a problem they stuffed it into the package and hopped no one would notice.

You didn't get all of your negatives back? (The lab should have a way to find them, there were jobs being done at the same time and your negatives are most likely in one of them, the lab should check the jobs and if needed call the customers who have already picked up their work and ask them to please check and offer a freebie to them as incentive to return the negatives to the lab)


Face it though, the workers in Targets One hour lab aren't photofinishers, last week they were probably in charge of stocking feminine hygiene products. They're just monkeys who are pushing buttons on machines that they know nothing about.

Professional Labs will make goofs and screw ups too, trust me on this it's what I do for a living, and we do screw up. Almost anything, with some major exceptions, can be fixed to some extent though and the attitude you recieved was



These were reprints so I know that all -'s were fine when they went in so the sprocket holes are not the camera's fault. I only didn't get the blank -'s that they leave on to make them fit the machine.

I am counting on my pro lab to tell me when they mess up. I wouldn't be so mad if they said "we had trouble with the machine and the - got messed up. Sorry."
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:16:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:

Already have digital and about $700 in digital equipment. I just like film, and it is cheaper until digital goes down. I also know that film will last at least 100 years, where there is a major risk in digital.




If that is the case, you can upload your digital images to Ritz camera and get 4x6 prints for 29 cents apiece and have the best of both worlds.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:56:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:

These were reprints so I know that all -'s were fine when they went in so the sprocket holes are not the camera's fault. I only didn't get the blank -'s that they leave on to make them fit the machine.

I am counting on my pro lab to tell me when they mess up. I wouldn't be so mad if they said "we had trouble with the machine and the - got messed up. Sorry."



My new best guess dovetails with my earlier best guess, your film strip got caught in the film gate, and they mucked up removing it and damaged your film. Ham handed azzhts that should be sent back to stocking feminine hygiene products.


Link Posted: 1/9/2005 4:59:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:

Already have digital and about $700 in digital equipment. I just like film, and it is cheaper until digital goes down. I also know that film will last at least 100 years, where there is a major risk in digital.




If that is the case, you can upload your digital images to Ritz camera and get 4x6 prints for 29 cents apiece and have the best of both worlds.



How?
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