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Posted: 1/5/2012 3:31:35 AM EDT
I am about to purchase a foreclosed home that needs carpet, drywall, paint, siding, and flooring. I have the paint and drywall going to a friend who is doing it for cost.

I am most curious about the flooring. It's a 2150sqft split foyer, 4 bed with 2 bonus rooms, 3 bathrooms. I would like having hardwood upstairs with carpet in the basement. How much would I be looking at paying to do about ~1300sqft of hardwood upstairs and then the remaining 850 with cheap carpet. Thanks!

Location is just north of atlanta
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 3:45:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 3:54:36 AM EDT by tomrocks21212]
Depends. New install of hardwood is typically abou $5-$6 a square foot..... Supply, install, sand and finish. More if there's old flooring to come out. Regional price differences will impact this somewhat, as will different species and grades of wood.
Installing hardwood isn't difficult, but it's hard on your back if you're not used to doing it.
What tools do you have? A compressor-driven flooring stapler makes the work a lot easier, and they can be rented for not too much. You'll save about 1/2 this way. But I'd recommend getting a pro to do the sanding, it's real easy to gouge the flooring if you're not careful. Staining and finishing you can do, there are a lot of products out there. My favorite is shellac. Yes, shellac. Nobody uses it any more, but it's fast, it's easy, and traffic wear can be repaired and feathered in easily, unlike polyurethanes. It looks better than urethanes, too, IMHO.

If you or your buddy has some carpentry tools, I'd suggest you look into doing it. There are some basic rules for getting the layout to look good, and procedures for speeding up the work, if you're thinking about it I can give you more info.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 3:48:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:00:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VA-gunnut:
Is this house for you, or are you just going to resell?

If you don't plan on keeping it, just go with carpet through the place.


+1.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:00:33 AM EDT
contact RediFloors Atlanta. 1791 Williams Dr., Marietta, GA 30066 (770) 590-7334
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:01:46 AM EDT
It's going to be my house

BRB 4/3 with 2 acres and bonus rooms for 54k
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:31:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalTaco:
It's going to be my house

BRB 4/3 with 2 acres and bonus rooms for 54k

Sweet deal.

I'm paying $1.00 a foot labor for floating floor
$1.50 a foot for glue/nail down and
$2.00 a foot for real wood sand and refinish.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:07:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 5:10:08 AM EDT by wildearp]
I have done a lot of flooring and have never had back issues. Knees, is where it gets you.

Wood is super easy, if you use quality materials and follow manufacturer recommendations. It is a good idea to have temperature and humidity controlled too, or you will have expansion/contraction issues.

If you want durability, look at porcelain tile. If you have pets and kids, look at porcelain tile. If you are flipping the house, go with carpet, and be sure to tip your drywall guy doing it at cost, or that will be the last flip he works for you.

If you aren't going to do paint yourself to save cash, I kinda wonder why i am giving any advice at all.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:13:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TacticalTaco:
I would like having hardwood upstairs with carpet in the basement.


If you are going to live there and your basement stands ANY chance of flooding, I'd recommend against carpet. Any chance you can go with tile instead?

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:17:49 AM EDT
i would rather cut and replace carpet once every 10 years than deal with the cold ass tile floor in the basement. We had one growing up.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:22:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By stockshift:
Originally Posted By TacticalTaco:
I would like having hardwood upstairs with carpet in the basement.


If you are going to live there and your basement stands ANY chance of flooding, I'd recommend against carpet. Any chance you can go with tile instead?



I'm fairly ignorant when it comes to basements, since we don't have them in CA, but to me, basements scream for Epoxy coat.

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Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:28:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 5:28:36 AM EDT by TacticalTaco]
Tile in the basement sounds like a good idea. I'll get a quote on it as well. So for some red colored hardwood to be sanded, installed, would be ~2sqft? That's including material?
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