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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 12/10/2003 10:06:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/10/2003 10:21:53 PM EDT by The_Cheat]
I've been doing some thinking on the pro's and con's of different religions, some better than others.

I'm not a Jew now obviously, or else I wonldn't be asking these questions. But Reform Judiasm has caught my eye a little can anybody tell me a little more about it?
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 10:31:33 PM EDT
i'm now dating a harcore jewish hottie that hates liberals! i'll have to have her IM you. she looooves to rant/debate this shit. she kicks ass!
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 10:48:21 PM EDT
I believe EricTheH teaches evening classes in Hunetic Law. [b][blue]Even a fundamental understanding of Hunetic Law would give you a foundation[/b][/blue] from which you might be better able to make further decisions. This course is pretty inclusive. About every six weeks they visit the stockyards and learn how to [b][red]properly slaughter[/b][/red] various animals in the correct Hunetic (Kosher) manner. (I'm not certain exactly what tools are allowable for slaughtering but I don't believe any full-auto weapons can be used.) Then there's another night dealing exclusively with rabbit slaughter but I really don't much about what happens on that night. [b]You might check with EricTheH for more factual details.[/b] [purple]5sub[/purple]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:46:50 AM EDT
I believe at least a portion of ETH's classes may now be taken on line. 5sub
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:51:59 AM EDT
.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:55:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Cheat: I've been doing some thinking on the pro's and con's of different religions, some better than others. I'm not a Jew now obviously, or else I wonldn't be asking these questions. But Reform Judiasm has caught my eye a little can anybody tell me a little more about it?
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Ah, judiasm light. Reform is pretty laid back, but it has gotten more religious over the past 50 years. Started in Germany around the turn of the century to allow jews to be more like the German neighbors so they can get along. Didn't work out too well. Many left prior to the holocaust and brought reform judiasm here. There is some Hebrew, mostly prayers and some Torah readings, but the majority of the service is in english. They don't do Kosher. The basic tenant of judiasm is constant throughout from Reform-Hassidic/Orthodox. Belief in one God. They don't get on the Heaven and Hell trip. Do good because God told you to, not because he will send you to hell if you don't. Call it the "self-motivating" religion. Oh, a couple of negatives. A good number of people on this board will condemn you eternity of hellfire and damnation for being jewish and subslr will blame you for the USS Liberty. Then there is the whole gifelte (sp?) fish thing. Talk to a rabbi, they love to talk
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 6:30:40 AM EDT
Believe in the one G-d. Correct Jews don't do Hell, but all get into heaven, although there may be some time in Limbo if you have not been a good person. dietary laws, but reform generally don't follow them except perhaps on holidays. Lots of festivals and holidays, Hanuka has 8 days of presents instead of one, great for kids, better if like me from a mixed marriage where Christmas is also celebrated. Other than that, it is the root religion of Christianity so the basics are pretty much the same with the exception of the messiah having not yet arrived. Good food, except Gefilte fish, that stuff is just plain gross.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:48:27 AM EDT
I've heard it's really hard for a non-Jew to convert to Judism. I've been curious about Judism as well. From what I've garnered on the whole Kosher thing, it has always struck me that this was the earlist practice of sanitary methods, i.e. reducing the spread of disease & food born illnesses. Always thought it was cool. Hopefully somoeone will enlighten us all further.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:52:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CS223: I've heard it's really hard for a non-Jew to convert to Judism. I've been curious about Judism as well. From what I've garnered on the whole Kosher thing, it has always struck me that this was the earlist practice of sanitary methods, i.e. reducing the spread of disease & food born illnesses. Always thought it was cool. Hopefully somoeone will enlighten us all further.
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You are correct. The kosher thing is directly related to sanitary practices. They had neither refrigeration, nor meat thermometers in the desert. Pork being obvious for trichinosis if not properly cooked, and certain combinations of foods for the ability to mask the taste or smell of tainted food. As for conversion, from what I understand it requires, study, commitment, and real faith.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:57:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 5subslr5: I believe at least a portion of ETH's classes may now be taken on line. 5sub
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True...and funding is available for those that qualify.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:59:04 AM EDT
Don't have time here, at work, but will get back to you later on. some of what's already been posted is accurate.but much BS alo.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:17:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By shotar: Believe in the one G-d. Correct Jews don't do Hell, but all get into heaven, although there may be some time in Limbo if you have not been a good person. dietary laws, but reform generally don't follow them except perhaps on holidays. Lots of festivals and holidays, Hanuka has 8 days of presents instead of one, great for kids, better if like me from a mixed marriage where Christmas is also celebrated. Other than that, it is the root religion of Christianity so the basics are pretty much the same with the exception of the messiah having not yet arrived. Good food, except Gefilte fish, that stuff is just plain gross.
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It's the Aspic that some Gefilte Fish is packed in the grosses me out. What is that stuff...Fish flavored KY Jelly? Anyway-Reform Judism has "Officially" ended the is supposed to be only 2 types now Orthadox and Conservative -However Conservative temple now have a reform element. I went to a High Holiday service w/a female Rabbi (Rabbi means teacher not preacher, no preaching allowed in Judism)held in the Holiday Inn...I guess that made it the High Holiday Inn. No Heaven nor Hell. You are either w/G-D or with nothing for all eternity.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:27:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sgtar15:
Originally Posted By 5subslr5: I believe at least a portion of ETH's classes may now be taken on line. 5sub
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True...and funding (in the form of high interest loans) is available for those that qualify.
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[:D] 5sub
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:44:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 9:45:12 AM EDT by DriftPunch]
Originally Posted By The_Cheat: Reform Judiasm has caught my eye
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Define 'caught my eye'. Are you interested acedemicly, or are you shopping a faith? No offense, but your faith is big time in question if you are browsing. Perhaps being agnostic is best for you, as it's an honest way to believe in a god, while rejecting organized religion. Conversions just bother me, as they strike me as a symptom of someone who doesn't really believe in their chosen faith, but goes through the motions, just to belong socially.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 1:24:05 PM EDT
If Reform Judaism has ended, it's news to me and the members of my congregation. What I have experienced is that many Reform congregations have adopted more traditional formats in their services. For instance in my congregation, head covering is usual during services. Judaism does not seek converts, for a very good reason. It does not see itself as some magic ticket into heaven, unlike some other religious groups. Therefor, it does not feel a need to convince others of some mythical magic path to an afterworld reward. In fact, there is no settled belief about whether or not there even is an afterlife. The best statement about this I ever heard was, "If a person lives his life trying to make THIS world as heavenlike as possible, whatever comes after will take care of itself". We believe that anyone, Jew, Gentile, Dieist, Pagan, Agnostic, Atheist, will reach Heaven, if it in fact exists, if they live a life of honor and respect for their fellow man. My best advice to you is to find a Reform congregation near you, attend some services, perhaps make an appointment to speak with the Rabbi to ask questions and get some answers. When you've experienced the worship and belief, and asked the questions that come to mind, you'll be in a better position to make a decision. Whatever you decide to do, I wish you success in your journey
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 3:42:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
Originally Posted By The_Cheat: Reform Judiasm has caught my eye
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Define 'caught my eye'. Are you interested acedemicly, or are you shopping a faith? No offense, but your faith is big time in question if you are browsing. Perhaps being agnostic is best for you, as it's an honest way to believe in a god, while rejecting organized religion. Conversions just bother me, as they strike me as a symptom of someone who doesn't really believe in their chosen faith, but goes through the motions, just to belong socially.
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Your faith doesn't have to be in question. If you read the bible and you understand the message but the priest, preacher, rabbi trys to tell you that it means something else, or you belong to a denomination that twists the Teachings in a manner you feel is inconsistant, then it is with good reason that you try to seek the truth or at least a different view to help you better understand the Word. Additionally, it's plain as day that some churches are merely businesses and operating in that manner. And the Catholic church, before Vatican 2, had a saying that the only purpose of the congregation was to "pray, pay and obey". So no matter what "religion" or denomination that you belong to, there are liable to be some issues that you question. In fact I don't think in any religious argument that I've heard among church going people (non atheists), have I heard anyone question the teachings of the Bible. But the application and how those teachings are applied have long been a center of controversy.
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 4:39:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/12/2003 4:39:58 AM EDT by DScott]
"[red]Judi[/red]asm" is about the worship of all things "Judi". I'm still not sure who she is! [;)] Now [red]"Judaism"[/red] is about being Jewish. Of all the "movements" in Judaism, the Reform movement is the most liberal in interpreting and applying the beliefs or laws of the religion. For example, many Conservative jews and all Orthodox Jews follow the laws about keeping kosher very strictly, such as not ever eating pork. Many reform Jews might "try" to keep kosher, but could probably give you a really good recipe for an Easter ham if you needed it. [;D] The simplest way to understand [u]any[/u] jewish holiday is this: [b]They tried to kill us. We won. Let's eat! [/b] Enjoy your search!
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 5:09:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DScott: "[red]Judi[/red]asm" is about the worship of all things "Judi". I'm still not sure who she is! [;)] Now [red]"Judaism"[/red] is about being Jewish. Of all the "movements" in Judaism, the Reform movement is the most liberal in interpreting and applying the beliefs or laws of the religion. For example, many Conservative jews and all Orthodox Jews follow the laws about keeping kosher very strictly, such as not ever eating pork. Many reform Jews might "try" to keep kosher, but could probably give you a really good recipe for an Easter ham if you needed it. [;D] The simplest way to understand [u]any[/u] jewish holiday is this: [b]They tried to kill us. We won. Let's eat! [/b] Enjoy your search!
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Except for Yom Kippur. God, please don't kill us and we won't eat.
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 6:20:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By DScott: "[red]Judi[/red]asm" is about the worship of all things "Judi". I'm still not sure who she is! [;)] Now [red]"Judaism"[/red] is about being Jewish. Of all the "movements" in Judaism, the Reform movement is the most liberal in interpreting and applying the beliefs or laws of the religion. For example, many Conservative jews and all Orthodox Jews follow the laws about keeping kosher very strictly, such as not ever eating pork. Many reform Jews might "try" to keep kosher, but could probably give you a really good recipe for an Easter ham if you needed it. [;D] The simplest way to understand [u]any[/u] jewish holiday is this: [b]They tried to kill us. We won. Let's eat! [/b] Enjoy your search!
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Except for Yom Kippur. God, please don't kill us and we won't eat.
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Maybe then it would be: "They tried to kill us. We won. We wait a bit, solemnly, [u]then[/u] we eat!" [:D]
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 6:57:57 AM EDT
Judaisim.... Hmm... 'Reform' Judaisim is the jewish equivalent of 'liberal' Christiantity (Most recent example would be the Anglicans & gay officials) ... Basically a feel-good 'spirituality' based on a desire to have 'something to believe in' or to 'keep up the traditions' while discarding 'undesirable' requirements and commands... It's an attempt in some senses at a 'Convienient' strain of Judaisim, and in other senses as a reaction to the over-traditionalization/legalisim of the Orthodox version... OTOH, Orthodox Judaisim is on the other side of the fence, a legalistic religeon that expounds upon the original 'what is written' with add-on commandments, and to some extent elevates human tradition over God, in the persuit of pleasing God... Christian equivalent in this regard would be Catholicisim and some of the more conservative Lutheran and Baptist organizations... On the base, Judaisim (of course) follows the same God as Christiantity, we say Messiah came 2000-some years ago they say we're wrong, and are still waiting... That's my perspective anyway...
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 7:00:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By shamayim: If Reform Judaism has ended, it's news to me and the members of my congregation. What I have experienced is that many Reform congregations have adopted more traditional formats in their services. For instance in my congregation, head covering is usual during services.Snip
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As is said it "Officially" ended. Not that the practice was abandoned. It just eeevoluted into the conservative sphere. Hey my congregation is a Reform as they come.
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