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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/21/2004 7:02:31 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:04:41 AM EST
The pump does not work at all unless you move it manually? Get a new float valve.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:05:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 7:07:23 AM EST by A-nus]
Yuck, sounds like the switch that the float activates is going.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:05:35 AM EST
Yes, that thing is a float switch. I'd say it's toast if you have to shake it make it work. I think they can be replaced independent of the pump itself. Make sure you disconnect the thing from power before working on it.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:06:03 AM EST
Nevermind................

I thought this was going to be a botd thread or something.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:06:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 7:07:40 AM EST by DK-Prof]
Usually, the floating part is kind of a balloon-like ovoid thingy - that has a metal ball inside it. When it moves up with the water level (and reaches a certain angle) the metal ball will roll down to the bottom of the float, closing a circuit and starting the pump up. (It's almost a little like the "tilt" feature on a pinball machine - if that terrible analogy helps at all )


On most sump pumps, you can adjust this a little by how much loose wire there is holding the float, so that it reaches that angle a little sooner or a little later - depending on how high the water is.

If you having trouble with it, I'd just recommend buying a new one. Sump pumps are not particularly expensive - but what is expensive is having your basment flood, with everything it it. (That happened in our house in Nashville last year, and it took about a week of hard work and about $1500 to clean up the mess.) A new sump pump is about $50-$100.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:07:08 AM EST
If you want a good sump pump get a WEIL. They are one of the best out there. I use to sell them.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:08:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 7:10:55 AM EST by MillerSHO]
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:09:01 AM EST

Submersable?

Depend on the type of floatswitch. The freefloating ones on a cord have a mercury switch in them. It could be going bad, or it could be catching on someting or need adjusted (make longer or shorter)

There is another type that are just a float that rides on a rod and is usually a magnetic switch. The pump might not be level and the float can stick on it's guiderod.

Pedastal pumps usually have a float that moves a mechanical switch, rod could be binding.


Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:27:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:36:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By MillerSHO:

Originally Posted By Waldo:
Submersable?

Depend on the type of floatswitch. The freefloating ones on a cord have a mercury switch in them. It could be going bad, or it could be catching on someting or need adjusted (make longer or shorter)

There is another type that are just a float that rides on a rod and is usually a magnetic switch. The pump might not be level and the float can stick on it's guiderod.

Pedastal pumps usually have a float that moves a mechanical switch, rod could be binding.





I looked at it closer, this is what I found.

The floater has a ball of some sort in it, what I thought was a rubber hose, is actually an electrical wire that connected to the pump through the electical wire for the pump itself.

So in other words, the ball isn't connected directly to the pump, its only connected to the pump electrically and whats weird, is the float relys on the electrical cord zip corded to the actual pump to create a piviot point so the float will raise and drop the ball in the float to activate.



Yep, thats how that model works, if you want to upgrade, there's a model with a ball float on a rod similar to a toilet float, but the rod is perfectly vertical with guides keeping it that way. These are common on the sump pumps with the motor mounted up high above the water level, but nicer submersibles have this mechanism as well. They have them at home depot, because while I was there replacing my non-submersible, a guy was looking for the type you have and I helped him pick out the one he needed.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:38:24 AM EST

Talk to me about Sump Pumps

They suck.

Link Posted: 10/21/2004 7:42:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 9:20:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 2:24:29 PM EST by Waldo]

Originally Posted By MillerSHO:

So in other words, the ball isn't connected directly to the pump, its only connected to the pump electrically and whats weird, is the float relys on the electrical cord zip corded to the actual pump to create a piviot point so the float will raise and drop the ball in the float to activate.



The switch just pivots on it's own cord. There is usually a clamp that holds the cord to the pump body somewhere with a screw. You adjust the water level by letting out or taking in slack on the cord. All the while, you have to remember that it has to be unobstructed.

If the floatswitch is fully submerged and not turning on the pump, its probably bad. If on the otherhand the float is in the horizontal and starts when you jiggle it, it may just need adjusted.


Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:01:22 AM EST
Talk to me about Sump Pumps

Buy a new sump pump. Weils have a good rep. Fix the old one and keep as a back up. Pumps crap out at the worst times and when the even the new one craps out (and it will eventually), the B/U will be priceless.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:15:28 PM EST
I have had several replaced over time on sewage systems. Most low cost pumps last 2 to 5 years. Better ones might be better life. Float switches are common to go bad.

GL on the replacement. I had a 1/3 hp replaced last summer for about $500 including labor\service call.

Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:23:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By MillerSHO:
One more thing, mine is a submersable pump, I don't think I answered that question.



Last spring I went through the same problem. My switch was also a floater in line with the electrical cord.

Do yourself a favor...buy a new pump. They don't cost that much, but can cause a lot of damage when they don't work.
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