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Posted: 3/17/2005 6:39:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/17/2005 7:11:56 AM EST by Fat_McNasty]
So what is it that gives people courage to start grinding on there trigger and sear? This week alone I have had to try and track down parts for 4 Ruger M77 MkII’s. What’s great about this is RUGER WILL NOT SELL the trigger and sears. It’s a factory send back. So I’m having to try and track down a new one.
Well the only Manufacture I can find that has a combo (trigger and sear) is Timney. Every one is back ordered, I call Timney, They are out too ( looking at 3 weeks). But I sweet talk the sales lady and I end up getting one. Call the customer back and tell him the price ($95 ish). He says no prob, Also let him know it’s a drop in. But I suggest that I install so it right. He wants to put it in and do it him self.
So customer picks up the Rifle and new trigger and sear, off he goes.
Next day I get a call. It’s the customer. His new trigger does not work. So I tell him to bring it in and ill take a look. Long story short, It didn’t fit in the stock with the new trigger so he took a grinder to the stops (no safety), also ground on the trigger and sear again. AAARRRGGG!!!
For gods sakes if you don’t have the tooling/tools and knowledge to do the job right. Please take it to a competent “Gunsmith” (not some shit bird wan be, there are a lot of those out there). That $45 you pay in a trigger job is a hell of a lot cheaper than doing it your self. The above guy is looking at $95 x 2 + $45=$195 $235.
And why is it that when a customer brings in a body bag (torn apart gun). It is always a Bro-in-Law that took it apart and could not get it back together? And why don’t they let me know that they lost one of the tiny screws or springs? Not me having to find out while I am putting it back together?
Lastly, What was going through the guy’s mind that brought me a scope and box of shells and asked me if I could sight this in before deer season?
Oh well time to get back to work on the 460 Wby Mag.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:41:42 AM EST
Hey at least buisness is good.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:41:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/17/2005 6:44:25 AM EST by PBIR]
He's an idiot with a dremel, maybe he'll continue to bless your register by never learning his lesson. I'm sure the customer has his good side too though, like the ability to do math. You should be charging him $235, not $195
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:42:04 AM EST
Good stuff. Keep 'em coming. I like these as much as "True Stories of the FFL!"
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:44:49 AM EST
Tell the one about the "gunsmith" that took two weeks to drill and tap holes for a scope mount and the holes were 1/8th inch out of alignment but still charges $40 for the job. That's a good one.

Not Fat_McNasty. It was a turd with a drill press in Winchester TN.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:45:46 AM EST

Lastly, What was going through the guy’s mind that brought me a scope and box of shells and asked me if I could sight this in before deer season?





Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:46:41 AM EST
I have built hotrod engines from scratch, done transmission swap-outs, replaced a couple of under dash wiring harnesses, repaired electric & pneumatic HVAC valves, worked on washers & dryers, our pool pump and God knows how many other things but I WILL NOT take ANY tools to a firearm to alter it, other than sandpaper or steel wool.

Firearms alterations is one place where I'll gladly grease the wheels of commerce to get a job done by an experienced professional.

I've had gunsmith work done to a couple of my firearms and I'm 100% satisfied with the work and I thought the price was fair.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:46:53 AM EST
You're shortchanging yourself...

95x2=190 +45 =235, not 195

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:48:26 AM EST
Sounds like a Repeat Customer to me.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:49:52 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:50:51 AM EST
I installed one of those Timney adjustable triggers on my wifes MKII Compact 77. Took about 1-1.5 hrs. The hardest part was fitting the safety.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:51:08 AM EST
try Rifle Basix...

Not the best trigger out there but supply has been good, and they make stuff for guns that other don't. For example, I bought a replacement drop in for a little Savage Cub -G... A $80 trigger seems a little crazy in a $130 gun, but thats what it took to turn this into a beautiful little shooter for my daughter...

As for the idiot owners with the grinder, don't complain! These morons are your best customers! Let 'em come... It's a $90 labor job every time they fuck one up.... Hell, If I was you, I'd give every gun buyer a free stone.... Think of the business your'd generate!!!

Part of this problem is RUGER, and the other makers with crappy triggers. If they make a gun with an acceptable trigger in the first place, there would not be an issue. When the customer wants to buy a Ruger because it's $20 cheaper, have them compare it to something with a better trigger. It's their choice: Live with the crappy trigger, fix it themself and fuck it up to the tune of $200, or spend another $50 on a rifle that has a okay trigger in the first place....

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:58:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By Sandman67:
You're shortchanging yourself...

95x2=190 +45 =235, not 195




LOL im a gunsmith not a mathamatition! Maby that why im not making any money....
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:00:35 AM EST
Encourage him to keep trying.
He'll nail it, eventually.

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:07:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/17/2005 7:08:18 AM EST by MudBug]
I have done "Buff" jobs on a few triggers, 2 HP's, and my CZ 452 turned out fine, infact great, but when I did one on my brand new Encore just 2 days before my javalina hunt I almost screwed myself good. I ended up being able to push off the hammer, which was not good. Luckily I just took it apart and increased the angle on the sear a tiny bit now I have one of the nicest triggers I've ever felt on a T/C pistol. The weird thing is that I barely even touched the sear in the first place, I think it was more the combination of the small amount of polishing I did and the much lighter spring I used didn't put enough pressure against the sear to hold it tight.

But while I have been lucky, I do enjoy the piece of mind I get by just dropping a firearm off to a competent smith and getting back a quality job... sometimes I just can't help myself though, I like to tinker.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:12:06 AM EST


I could probably tell just as many stories about (so called) gunsmiths who couldn't do a trigger job if their life depended on it. (much less actually machine anything).

The last one I met earned the well deserved nickname "hacksaw"

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:15:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/17/2005 7:16:32 AM EST by Fat_McNasty]

Originally Posted By Waldo:

I could probably tell just as many stories about (so called) gunsmiths who couldn't do a trigger job if their life depended on it. (much less actually machine anything).

The last one I met earned the well deserved nickname "hacksaw"



LOL I do a lot of rework for customers that took stuff to Hacksmiths (2 in the valley where im at).
You would not beleve the stuff I have seen! Coming out of those shops. EEEKKKK
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:21:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By frozenny:
try Rifle Basix...





They have a trigger but no sear for the MKII.

NEF's have probly the worst triggers I have ever had to work on. Or a 10/22 out of the box.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:30:42 AM EST
If you send the rifle back to Ruger, they will fix most anything either for free, or at-cost, IIRC.
I bought a used Ruger MkII that had a loose barrel (when heated to 100deg by the sun, the barrel could rotate freely in the reciever), they sent me a whole new pistol for just the cost of shipping the old one back to them.

Kharn
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:31:44 AM EST
I have a Dremel tool, the latest Brownell's catalog, and 16 oz carpenters hamer. Doesn't that mean I can call myself a gunsmith?

Where I live all we have are glorified fieldstrip technians. What i wouldn't give for a decent 'smith within 50 miles driving range.......
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:40:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By Kharn:
I bought a used Ruger MkII that had a loose barrel.
Kharn


Man you got lucky. Normaly they are crossthreaded in And/or chips in the threads. Barrel replacement requires cutting off /turning out the old barrel. Chaseing the threads installing the new match blank. Unless you want to twist the action/ strip out the threads.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:48:58 AM EST
A six pack and Dremel tool makes Bubba an instant gunsmith.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:52:55 AM EST
Hold my beer and hand me the cordless Dremel........
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 11:56:17 AM EST
I guess I have been lucky with my home gunsmithing. Having access to my uncle who is a machinist and all of his tools is a plus. The only trouble I have gotten into after doing around 8 trigger jobs on various guns was with a .410 Mossberg pump, I just couldn't figure out how the damn springs went. Luckily that same uncle has a gunsmith who works for him and he brought me in his book showing the proper spring alignment. BTW that gunsmith doesn't do trigger jobs because of insurance costs; it’s just a hobby for him. Oh yea, for those of you who say a Springfield XD's sights can't be changed without a press are wrong, sure it took some heat and some freezing and a couple of dings but it got done
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 2:27:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
So what is it that gives people courage to start grinding on there trigger and sear?



Beer, and the feeling of power that comes with figuring out how to put the little grinder attachment on the dremel.

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 5:31:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By Stealth:

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
So what is it that gives people courage to start grinding on there trigger and sear?



Beer, and the feeling of power that comes with figuring out how to put the little grinder attachment on the dremel.




And not understanding how the sear / trigger works and how UNSAFE you can make a gun by improperly grinding on it.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 5:47:37 PM EST
I do most stuff on my firearms, as an outgrowth of my metalworking hobby....so far, so good.

But I'm one that'll read, read, read, measure, read, measure, check, read, measure, check, measure, check, and THEN cut. So far so good.

The most work I'll do for friends is mounting scopes while at the range or when they come over with it before a trip to the range. Nothing else.

Some people are scared to use ANY tools on their firearms, which I find as funny as the beer & dremel "gunsmiths" since it often means they won't do a good job cleaning, and then wonder why their newfangled shootin stick turned into a jam-o-matic.
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