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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/26/2005 8:43:36 PM EDT
Is this true?
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:44:53 PM EDT
70,000 miles and mine gets run till the light comes on. Seen no problems as of yet.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:46:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:46:51 PM EDT
running a tank really low would suck more crap into the fuel line. may cause your fuel filter to clog up earlier, shouldn't cause any problem with the injectors that i could see.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:47:56 PM EDT
False, but most new cars come with a warning to not run the tank dry. The electric fuel pump in the tank sump could overheat if the tank is run dry.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:48:18 PM EDT
Early in electronic fuel-injection, running the tank empty was a no-no. Bad for the pump, REALLY bad for the injectors. I don't believe that's true anymore. The quarter-tank rule was to prevent the possibility of running dry, IIRC.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:48:48 PM EDT
Just don't run a diesel engine out of gas. That's all I know.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:51:50 PM EDT
I was told you could start getting gunk in your filter.

I keep it above a quarter because you never know when you're gonna get stuck in traffic.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:52:38 PM EDT
These days, at these prices, I have to fill up when I get down
to 3/4 of a tank. Otherwise the tab comes to more than $25.
So no worries here.

DanM
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:57:32 PM EDT
on older vehicles, lots of air space in the tank can lead to condensation and rust over time. the rust can cause problems for injectors if it makes it through the system.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:58:26 PM EDT
I have a fuel pump in my tank, when fuel isn't covering it to cool, it will heat up and contribute to it going bad.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:58:29 PM EDT
It used to be "don't run out of gas"

False
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:58:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2005 8:59:37 PM EDT by www-glock19-com]
as said before it can be hard on the intank fuel pump
useally only a issue with people that constantly run their tanks almost empty
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:58:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AyeGuy:
Is this true?




Hey, Homer....how much is a quarter tank? Duh...how much do da tank hold, if a do tank do hold wood?

How 'clean be da gas'?

What do you percieve the 'fuel injection system' to be?

Variables.....
"Mom is that you?"

<­BR>

Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:59:25 PM EDT
False . . . that's only true with a diesel
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:59:51 PM EDT
True but not harmful to the injectors, rather the in tank fuel pump. It is always running and a low fuel tank could cause it to overheat. This raises the load on the vapor recovery system and could damage the fuel pump.

And the the guy who ran out of gas in a diesel, don't you mean diesel?
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:00:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
The electric fuel pump in the tank sump could overheat if the tank is run dry.

The fuel pump motor is cooled by the gasoline that surrounds it. If it continuously runs low, over time the pump motor will burn out prematurely
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:01:52 PM EDT
Water settles on the bottom of the tank anyways, so when you start the car it will use the water first and you'll know immediately if you have condensation problems.


But you shouldn't leave the tank mostly empty for long periods of time because the gas tank not actually filled with fuel is filled with air, which has moisture which can condense over time.

I've heard that acetone is good for getting water out the because it soaks up moisture and evaporates so quickly.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:16:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2005 9:19:07 PM EDT by jimtash9]
My car's fuel pump has 196,000 miles on it and the sad thing is that it was mostly cheap gas.
Man how I long for the good 'ol days.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:17:31 PM EDT
I have a 22 gallong tank. I often run it down 21 gals between fills. I get the warning low fuel light and figure I have about 30 miles max left.

Never had a problem with my fuel pumps, but then I generally trade in the car/suv/van at 60,000 miles. your mileage may vary.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:19:01 PM EDT
On older in tank pump designs it was an issue
since slosh could cause cavitations of the pump .
The pump would also run hotter since it was above
the fuel level and lose the cooling effect of being
submerged .

Newer designs that use a fuel module don’t have
this problem since the pump is in a housing that
stays full from the fuel return , or a 2 stage
pickup design .
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:19:11 PM EDT
... Only the guys with wives can answer this truthfully

(I swear, my ex-wife always parked the car home on fumes - always)
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:22:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sukebe:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
The electric fuel pump in the tank sump could overheat if the tank is run dry.

The fuel pump motor is cooled by the gasoline that surrounds it. If it continuously runs low, over time the pump motor will burn out prematurely



+1
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:22:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CAR-10:
Just don't run a diesel engine out of gas. That's all I know.


You can't do that. They don't take any gas..........



In the winter, keep the tanks as full as possible. Injected engines have a fuel return. This fuel is heated as it passes through the system and thereby heats the fuel in the tank. (gas and diesel) The lower the fuel level in the tank, the greater air space and the greater amount of condensation as the fuel cools after the engine is shut off as well as cool air moisture coming in during fuel consumption. I try to keep at least half a tank, but never let it get below a quarter. Damage to injection systems is not an issue in that the fuel filter will pull out the particulate matter. However, if the filter is beyond the pump from the tank, you risk particulates damaging the pump seals.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:36:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PsyWarrior:

Originally Posted By CAR-10:
Just don't run a diesel engine out of gas. That's all I know.


You can't do that. They don't take any gas..........



In the winter, keep the tanks as full as possible. Injected engines have a fuel return. This fuel is heated as it passes through the system and thereby heats the fuel in the tank. (gas and diesel) The lower the fuel level in the tank, the greater air space and the greater amount of condensation as the fuel cools after the engine is shut off as well as cool air moisture coming in during fuel consumption. I try to keep at least half a tank, but never let it get below a quarter. Damage to injection systems is not an issue in that the fuel filter will pull out the particulate matter. However, if the filter is beyond the pump from the tank, you risk particulates damaging the pump seals.



Yeah, when I lived up north, WAY up north, I never let the tank drop below 1/2 full. It was a matter of having heat if you were stranded. Fear of the car getting lost deep in a snow embankment, (rural area) but so long as you could run the engine and keep a window cracked open for air- eventually the county snow plow crew will find you. I digress to memories of years that seem like yesterday but sadly are long ago. Sorry about that.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:48:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PsyWarrior:

Originally Posted By CAR-10:
Just don't run a diesel engine out of gas. That's all I know.


You can't do that. They don't take any gas..........



In the winter, keep the tanks as full as possible. Injected engines have a fuel return. This fuel is heated as it passes through the system and thereby heats the fuel in the tank. (gas and diesel) The lower the fuel level in the tank, the greater air space and the greater amount of condensation as the fuel cools after the engine is shut off as well as cool air moisture coming in during fuel consumption. I try to keep at least half a tank, but never let it get below a quarter. Damage to injection systems is not an issue in that the fuel filter will pull out the particulate matter. However, if the filter is beyond the pump from the tank, you risk particulates damaging the pump seals.



Only an issue with diesel fuel. Gasoline has such a high vapor pressure that the vapors always displace any humid air. Most gasoline, even summer low Reid vapor pressure variants required in many areas still have flash points of -20 F. In the winter, RVP requirements are decreased and such fuels have flash points in the -40F range!

Diesel, OTOH, has a flash point of about 130F.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 7:51:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PsyWarrior:

Originally Posted By CAR-10:
Just don't run a diesel engine out of gas. That's all I know.


You can't do that. They don't take any gas..........



I think I just threw up in my mouth. You know what I meant.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 7:52:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 8:20:54 AM EDT
Had a first model IROC-Z that I let get low on fuel while accelerating hard back in the 80's. Damaged the pump and caused all kinds of problems that they thought may have been a damaged pump, but couldn't diagnose. Rough idle, Rough cruise etc.

One day a year or so later the pump died. When the new pump was installed, all problems disappeared.

Bottom line.

Don't go low in the tank or you'd be sorry.

M4-AK
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 11:59:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AyeGuy:
Is this true?

No. When you run out of gas, your car will just shut off.
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