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Posted: 4/26/2013 8:11:04 AM EDT
So which combo do you guys lik?






I like a big survival knife like the Kabar heavy Bowie and a small saw like the 15 inch Sawvivor, because I just am not good with an Axe. The Axe takes some good technique, and you could seriously hurt your self with one wrong swing. I believe you can hurt your self with the Kabar as well but your not swinging it around to process wood like with an axe.




ETA: The Knife/Saw would be lighter weight as well I believe since in my scenario I would be on foot with a backpack.

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:13:17 AM EDT
[#1]
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:14:08 AM EDT
[#2]



Quoted:


I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:



http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg





Nice do you still have it?

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:14:27 AM EDT
[#3]
Gimme the ax and knife, i hate sawing shit.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:15:41 AM EDT
[#4]



Quoted:


Gimme the ax and knife, i hate sawing shit.


LOL



Sawing seems easier to me plus a 10 year old can do it vs swinging an axe.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:16:44 AM EDT
[#5]
Hatchet. Can do pretty much everything
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:19:33 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:

http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg



Who didn't!? It also gave me a life long scar when I was 11!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:20:43 AM EDT
[#7]
I'll take an axe over a saw for camping any day.  The big knives being pushed for survival are of limited use for much, basically they don't excel at anything.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:22:29 AM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:
I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:

http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg



Those were fun, Hecho in Pakistan.  Anywhere from $2 to $20 depending.

Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:23:02 AM EDT
[#9]



Quoted:


I'll take an axe over a saw for camping any day.  The big knives being pushed for survival are of limited use for much, basically they don't excel at anything.


They can chop and baton wood while the Saw can cut down the dead tree.

 



I want to point out this is a survival situation on foot not a camping trip.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:23:29 AM EDT
[#10]
Hatchet or mid-sized axe and a knife. Saws bust pretty easy, then what do you do? Besides a lot of branches that require sawing comeoff with a whack or two from an axe/hatchet.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:23:29 AM EDT
[#11]
One? pretty hard to say. Machete
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:24:28 AM EDT
[#12]
I have this in black.

Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:26:35 AM EDT
[#13]





Quoted:



Hatchet or mid-sized axe and a knife. Saws bust pretty easy, then what do you do? Besides a lot of branches that require sawing comeoff with a whack or two from an axe/hatchet.





Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile



Saws bust easy? I have not experienced this.
 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:30:35 AM EDT
[#14]
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:30:51 AM EDT
[#15]
When i go camping this always comes with me.  SVEN saw .  Everyone at camp start off with their hatchets but then they are using my saw.  This saw is amazing, i can rip through wood like it is butter.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:30:52 AM EDT
[#16]
Quoted:
I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:

http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg



i remember mine fondly
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:31:17 AM EDT
[#17]





What is it called?

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:32:01 AM EDT
[#18]
axe/knife combo...

medium axe with large knife though



I carry the Top long Hawk (30" haft by Equinox Coranado)(head by Craig barr) and a RTAK2 knife refinished with ceracoat.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:32:40 AM EDT
[#19]



Quoted:


When i go camping this always comes with me.  SVEN saw .  Everyone at camp start off with their hatchets but then they are using my saw.  This saw is amazing, i can rip through wood like it is butter.


This is what I wanna hear, but Axes are good to at cross cutting a down log as well with the right technique.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:35:49 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:


What is it called?  


Buck 184 Buckmaster survival knife

http://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_kw=Buck+184+BUCKMASTER+survival+knife+black+vers­ion
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:35:56 AM EDT
[#21]



Quoted:


axe/knife combo...



medium axe with large knife though



http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a105/mauser348/P8231003.jpg



I carry the Top long Hawk (30" haft by Equinox Coranado)(head by Craig barr) and a RTAK2 knife refinished with ceracoat.


I like but can those Axes down dead trees?

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:36:37 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:


What is it called?  


The Buck Hand-Stabber.

Seriously, how the fuck do you use that monstrosity?


To the OP, I like a 3" fixed blade, and a thick machete, like a Condor.

I have no interest in dealing with any piece of wood larger than 2" in diameter in a survival situation, but I do have a very serious need to move quickly through brush.  Bonus points - the machete is a better non-firearm weapon than anything else you might reasonably carry.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:39:39 AM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:

Quoted:
When i go camping this always comes with me.  SVEN saw .  Everyone at camp start off with their hatchets but then they are using my saw.  This saw is amazing, i can rip through wood like it is butter.

This is what I wanna hear, but Axes are good to at cross cutting a down log as well with the right technique.


That is true but a good saw is much faster and safer than any hatchet.  This saw collapses very small and it is very durable and easy to use and it is lighter than a hatchet. This is a one trick pony but it does its trick extremely well.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:40:55 AM EDT
[#24]
Big Axe/ Small Knife
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:40:55 AM EDT
[#25]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:

When i go camping this always comes with me.  SVEN saw .  Everyone at camp start off with their hatchets but then they are using my saw.  This saw is amazing, i can rip through wood like it is butter.


This is what I wanna hear, but Axes are good to at cross cutting a down log as well with the right technique.




That is true but a good saw is much faster and safer than any hatchet.  This saw collapses very small and it is very durable and easy to use and it is lighter than a hatchet. This is a one trick pony but it does its trick extremely well.



Also very true and why I pick a small saw and a big knife as my survival combo.

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:41:00 AM EDT
[#26]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Hatchet or mid-sized axe and a knife. Saws bust pretty easy, then what do you do? Besides a lot of branches that require sawing comeoff with a whack or two from an axe/hatchet.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile

Saws bust easy? I have not experienced this.  


He is talking about the camping style bow saws right? My experience has been that they are light duty.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:44:03 AM EDT
[#27]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:

Hatchet or mid-sized axe and a knife. Saws bust pretty easy, then what do you do? Besides a lot of branches that require sawing comeoff with a whack or two from an axe/hatchet.



Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Saws bust easy? I have not experienced this.  




He is talking about the camping style bow saws right? My experience has been that they are light duty.



Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Good enough for me.

 





Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:45:06 AM EDT
[#28]
Quoted:
Quoted:
I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:

http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg



i remember mine fondly


Mine saved my life quite a few times on those childhood adventures. It was the emergency machete to hack through the knee-high grass on the river bank. Lashed to a stick, it gave a spear point for defense against marauding squirrels in the backyard campouts.  The compass helped me navigate hundreds of yards over almost bumpy terrain.

And don't forget the rawhide leg straps.  That thing could be tied down just like an Old West gunfighter's holster.  You cinched that around your leg when things were going to get serious.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:50:36 AM EDT
[#29]
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:51:22 AM EDT
[#30]


What hell, why would they design a knife like that?! Seriously, what's the point of having what is basically two spikes on the handle bent back toward the user?
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:51:32 AM EDT
[#31]
esee laser strike and bahco 9" laplander saw...
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:52:19 AM EDT
[#32]
I prefer an axe with a good profile on it.

If you can't get your axe to take the right sized bites though you might as well be swinging at it with the poll side.

If I am processing firewood I would rather make a few chops through thicker stuff and be able to make a fast long log fire than the ability to make square cuts. Not so much in the summer since you don't need a constant fire going, but when you camp in the winter the wet wood mixed with the cold makes it nice to have a decent pile of firewood to get you through the night.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:55:31 AM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:


What hell, why would they design a knife like that?! Seriously, what's the point of having what is basically two spikes on the handle bent back toward the user?




To use as a grappling hook.

The spikes screw in and are easily removable.

Also there is a lanyard attachment on the handle cap.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:56:21 AM EDT
[#34]
Small Axe
Small knife
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:58:00 AM EDT
[#35]


This right here is damned hard to beat. I use an Enzo or Mora knife instead of the one pictured.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 8:59:23 AM EDT
[#36]



Quoted:


So which combo do you guys lik?


The right tool for the job.



For what you're describing it sounds like a Khukuri would be your best option. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kukri



It's the tool that I prefer for chopping. It'll process wood a hell of a lot more efficiently than a Kabar.

Combine that with a good folder clipped to your pocket and you're all set.



Hatchets are nice, but khuks are nicer.



 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:01:41 AM EDT
[#37]
Pretty much all of you need to look into/purchase a Bahco Laplander.

It will change your world!
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:08:35 AM EDT
[#38]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Mine saved my life quite a few times on those childhood adventures. It was the emergency machete to hack through the knee-high grass on the river bank, the spear point for defense against marauding squirrels in the backyard campouts, and the compass helped me navigate hundreds of yards over almost bumpy terrain.


A dull knife, matches, wire saw and fishing line... the destructive power for a 10 year old was virtually limitless.  I had never felt so powerful.


It's a special kind of genius that can weaponize preteen boy stupidity, then market it successfully in flea markets and Army surplus stores nationwide.

What memories! The knife on display at the store, with its survival gear arrayed beside it...the roughly rectangular piece of sharpening gravel attached to the sheath.  The blackness of the blade, and its obvious improvements over the boring (to a 10 year-old) USAF survival knife, gave promise that you would become a steely-eyed tough guy.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:20:53 AM EDT
[#39]
Quoted:
Quoted:


What hell, why would they design a knife like that?! Seriously, what's the point of having what is basically two spikes on the handle bent back toward the user?




To use as a grappling hook.

The spikes screw in and are easily removable.

Also there is a lanyard attachment on the handle cap.


The retard smiley applies more to you than it does him
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:28:23 AM EDT
[#40]



Quoted:





Quoted:

So which combo do you guys lik?


The right tool for the job.



For what you're describing it sounds like a Khukuri would be your best option. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kukri



It's the tool that I prefer for chopping. It'll process wood a hell of a lot more efficiently than a Kabar.

Combine that with a good folder clipped to your pocket and you're all set.



Hatchets are nice, but khuks are nicer.

 


Interesting, but can it chop a a 6 inch thick tree in half by using less energy vs a saw?

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:31:12 AM EDT
[#41]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:


What hell, why would they design a knife like that?! Seriously, what's the point of having what is basically two spikes on the handle bent back toward the user?




To use as a grappling hook.

The spikes screw in and are easily removable.

Also there is a lanyard attachment on the handle cap.


The retard smiley applies more to you than it does him


Weren't those used to make a slingshot?
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:32:19 AM EDT
[#42]
Woodsmans pal and a Sven saw makes me happy happy happy.  Knife needs can be met with a swiss army knife.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:34:05 AM EDT
[#43]



Quoted:


Woodsmans pal and a Sven saw makes me happy happy happy.  Knife needs can be met with a swiss army knife.


Which Swiss army knife do you have?

 
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:37:16 AM EDT
[#44]
I have a folding columbiia saw I like real well, I carry a few of the wire saws too.

Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:38:01 AM EDT
[#45]
Quoted:
I depended on this puppy from ages 8-12:

http://i43.tinypic.com/202t0z.jpg



I bet there is a very strong correlation between that statement and AR15.com membership (bought mine at fun show for $6)
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:40:07 AM EDT
[#46]
I have a Wyoming saw that looks similar to the one in that video.  It's holding up, I've broken a folding saw.

I don't use it much but to clear smallish fallen trees from the trail.

I want to get something like the OKC SP53 to use as a chopper.  Maybe their Kukri.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:40:52 AM EDT
[#47]
Quoted:
Quoted:


What hell, why would they design a knife like that?! Seriously, what's the point of having what is basically two spikes on the handle bent back toward the user?




To use as a grappling hook.

The spikes screw in and are easily removable.

Also there is a lanyard attachment on the handle cap.


Well at least they screw off. Sorry, still don't see the point. Seems like such little benefit for so many downsides (extra weight, blade that could come back at you if it dislodges, etc). Your money though, not mine. To each their own...
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:42:00 AM EDT
[#48]
extended chopping takes more energy than sawing. I will saw a log that is fewer strokes than chopping and I will chop branches that are fewer strokes than sawing...
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:43:06 AM EDT
[#49]


I have an original. Looks brand new. One of my prize possessions because I got my first job in order to pay for it, but then my dad bought it for me.
Link Posted: 4/26/2013 9:43:07 AM EDT
[#50]
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