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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/6/2005 5:57:34 AM EDT
Survey: 1.7M kids at home with loaded guns

By Marilyn Elias, USA TODAY
About 1.7 million U.S. children live in homes with loaded, unlocked firearms, according to the largest survey ever done on home weapons storage, out Tuesday in the Pediatrics online journal.

James Mercy, researcher with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleague Catherine Okoro analyzed surveys of 224,000 adults done by health departments in 50 states and the District of Columbia during 2002.

One-third of adults have handguns, rifles or shotguns at home, says the CDC report. But states vary greatly in the percentage of adults who keep weapons, and in how many with children at home store their guns loaded and unlocked. The states with the highest percentage of adults who have children at home and leave guns unlocked and loaded are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Eighteen states have laws dealing with proper storage of guns to limit access by children, says Jon Vernick, co-director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's school of public health. But the laws vary in strictness — 7 states make it a felony under some circumstances to give minors access to weapons — and they vary in the ages of kids covered, he says.

There's little known about how well these laws are enforced, Vernick adds. "They're great, and we absolutely need more states with laws. But often they seem to get enforced after it's too late, when a child has shot himself or someone else."

Two studies show accidental gun deaths and teen suicides decline in states with these laws, Vernick says.

The Pediatrics report says that of 1,400 children and teens shot to death in 2002, about 90% were home when it happened.

"It's a frightening problem," says Michael Barnes, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a lobbying group that favors limiting gun ownership.

The gun storage survey may underestimate kids with access to firearms, says CDC's Mercy, because women tend to underreport the presence of weapons at home, past studies show. About 60% of survey participants were women.

Gun ownership has declined in the past decade, says Barnes, because the USA is increasingly urban and fewer adults hunt.

Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the National Rifle Association of America, declined to comment on specific laws but says, "The sad reality is, you cannot legislate responsibility."

Education is the best way to reduce gun accidents, and the NRA runs many education programs, he says. "Children are by nature curious and will try to seek out objects they shouldn't have. ... It's up to the parents to see that firearms are stored safely."
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:00:44 AM EDT
Dollars to donuts that 'survey' includes 'children' up to 22 years old.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:05:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 6:11:06 AM EDT by QShok]
I guess guns are a disease for the CDC to be involved.

Shok


PS

Load­ed and locked at my house with two kids.

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:10:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By QShok:
I guess guns are a disease for the CDC to be involved.

Shok



They are a menace to public health and therefore fall under the always watchful eye of the CDC.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:11:02 AM EDT
USA Today, CDC, Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence........, real choice sources ya got there.

All of which have proven quite UN-RELIABLE where matters like this are concerned.

Mike
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:12:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mr_wilson:

USA Today, CDC, Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence........, real choice sources ya got there.




Don't kill the messenger!!
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:12:52 AM EDT
BAN HOMES!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:16:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By mr_wilson:

USA Today, CDC, Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence........, real choice sources ya got there.




Don't kill the messenger!!



Don't clutter the board w/ BS articles is all I can suggest.

Mike
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:16:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 6:17:17 AM EDT by Bama-Shooter]

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

The states with the highest percentage of adults who have children at home and leave guns unlocked and loaded are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.



I bet there are less firearm accidents in those state also compared to the rest. Those kids know how to use them properly.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:17:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mr_wilson:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By mr_wilson:

USA Today, CDC, Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence........, real choice sources ya got there.




Don't kill the messenger!!



Don't clutter the board w/ BS articles is all I can suggest.

Mike




Mike,


It's VERY IMPORTANT we keep our ear to the ground and know what the enemy is doing.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:18:45 AM EDT
My parents let me keep a loaded shotgun in my room when I was 10 years old. It's a damned miracle I survived.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:19:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Survey: 1.7M kids at home with loaded guns

By Marilyn Elias, USA TODAY
About 1.7 million U.S. children live in homes with loaded, unlocked firearms, according to the largest survey ever done on home weapons storage, out Tuesday in the Pediatrics online journal.

James Mercy, researcher with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleague Catherine Okoro analyzed surveys of 224,000 adults done by health departments in 50 states and the District of Columbia during 2002.

One-third of adults have handguns, rifles or shotguns at home, says the CDC report. But states vary greatly in the percentage of adults who keep weapons, and in how many with children at home store their guns loaded and unlocked. The states with the highest percentage of adults who have children at home and leave guns unlocked and loaded are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Eighteen states have laws dealing with proper storage of guns to limit access by children, says Jon Vernick, co-director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's school of public health. But the laws vary in strictness — 7 states make it a felony under some circumstances to give minors access to weapons — and they vary in the ages of kids covered, he says.

There's little known about how well these laws are enforced, Vernick adds. "They're great, and we absolutely need more states with laws. But often they seem to get enforced after it's too late, when a child has shot himself or someone else."

Two studies show accidental gun deaths and teen suicides decline in states with these laws, Vernick says.

The Pediatrics report says that of 1,400 children and teens shot to death in 2002, about 90% were home when it happened.

"It's a frightening problem," says Michael Barnes, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a lobbying group that favors limiting gun ownership.

The gun storage survey may underestimate kids with access to firearms, says CDC's Mercy, because women tend to underreport the presence of weapons at home, past studies show. About 60% of survey participants were women.

Gun ownership has declined in the past decade, says Barnes, because the USA is increasingly urban and fewer adults hunt.

Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the National Rifle Association of America, declined to comment on specific laws but says, "The sad reality is, you cannot legislate responsibility."

Education is the best way to reduce gun accidents, and the NRA runs many education programs, he says. "Children are by nature curious and will try to seek out objects they shouldn't have. ... It's up to the parents to see that firearms are stored safely."



I thought gun ownership was at an all time high?
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:20:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:

My parents let me keep a loaded shotgun in my room when I was 10 years old. It's a damned miracle I survived.



Our's was unloaded, but the shells were on the shelf where I would grab them and go shooting
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:20:53 AM EDT
A handgun is real useful as a defensive to if its locked away when that buglar is right outside your door.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:22:07 AM EDT
That's all? What about 16 year old girls home alone in remote areas? They need to be able to protect themselves too.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:22:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Fourays2:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Survey: 1.7M kids at home with loaded guns

By Marilyn Elias, USA TODAY
About 1.7 million U.S. children live in homes with loaded, unlocked firearms, according to the largest survey ever done on home weapons storage, out Tuesday in the Pediatrics online journal.

James Mercy, researcher with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleague Catherine Okoro analyzed surveys of 224,000 adults done by health departments in 50 states and the District of Columbia during 2002.

One-third of adults have handguns, rifles or shotguns at home, says the CDC report. But states vary greatly in the percentage of adults who keep weapons, and in how many with children at home store their guns loaded and unlocked. The states with the highest percentage of adults who have children at home and leave guns unlocked and loaded are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Eighteen states have laws dealing with proper storage of guns to limit access by children, says Jon Vernick, co-director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University's school of public health. But the laws vary in strictness — 7 states make it a felony under some circumstances to give minors access to weapons — and they vary in the ages of kids covered, he says.

There's little known about how well these laws are enforced, Vernick adds. "They're great, and we absolutely need more states with laws. But often they seem to get enforced after it's too late, when a child has shot himself or someone else."

Two studies show accidental gun deaths and teen suicides decline in states with these laws, Vernick says.

The Pediatrics report says that of 1,400 children and teens shot to death in 2002, about 90% were home when it happened.

"It's a frightening problem," says Michael Barnes, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a lobbying group that favors limiting gun ownership.

The gun storage survey may underestimate kids with access to firearms, says CDC's Mercy, because women tend to underreport the presence of weapons at home, past studies show. About 60% of survey participants were women.

Gun ownership has declined in the past decade, says Barnes, because the USA is increasingly urban and fewer adults hunt.

Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the National Rifle Association of America, declined to comment on specific laws but says, "The sad reality is, you cannot legislate responsibility."

Education is the best way to reduce gun accidents, and the NRA runs many education programs, he says. "Children are by nature curious and will try to seek out objects they shouldn't have. ... It's up to the parents to see that firearms are stored safely."



I thought gun ownership was at an all time high?

you should assume the exact opposite is true about anything that comes from the president of the VPC
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:23:34 AM EDT
The day I go to the AMA for gun advise is the day I thumb through Guns and Ammo for my medical questions.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:24:45 AM EDT
Here's a story right on topic, was going to post it a couple weeks ago but didn't:

linky


Kid found alone in house full of guns

Published August 25, 2005

Police found a 7-year-old child alone inside a South Side apartment filled with loaded guns Wednesday while carrying out a search warrant, officials said.

Officers entered an apartment in the 6300 block of South King Drive about 3:30 p.m. after learning that a man was allegedly selling narcotics from the location, police spokesman John Mirabelli said.

Upon entering the apartment's bedroom, police found the 7-year-old boy home alone. Inside the bedroom, they found a TEC-9 assault weapon loaded with 27 rounds of ammunition, as well as a loaded shotgun, Mirabelli said. Officers found six more loaded handguns elsewhere in the apartment, he said.

While police searched the home, two other children, ages 8 and 11, arrived and told officers that they also lived in the apartment, Mirabelli said.

The child's mother was taken into custody when she returned, he said. Charges are pending.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:27:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
My parents let me keep a loaded shotgun in my room when I was 10 years old. It's a damned miracle I survived.



You think that is a miracle, I was 14 when I was allowed to keep a loaded PISTOL in my room.. My favorite was my dads S&W 45 revolver, .45 ACP hydrashoks on half moon clips.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:39:39 AM EDT
I had a loaded 22 rifle in my room, next to my bed, from the time I was 13 until I could afford better.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:42:55 AM EDT
I grew up on various military bases, I knew I was okay with just a pellet gun in my closet.

At night, instead of counting sheep, I counted F4's and F18's.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:44:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AssaultRifler:
Here's a story right on topic, was going to post it a couple weeks ago but didn't:

linky


Kid found alone in house full of guns

Published August 25, 2005

Police found a 7-year-old child alone inside a South Side apartment filled with loaded guns Wednesday while carrying out a search warrant, officials said.

Officers entered an apartment in the 6300 block of South King Drive about 3:30 p.m. after learning that a man was allegedly selling narcotics from the location, police spokesman John Mirabelli said.

Upon entering the apartment's bedroom, police found the 7-year-old boy home alone. Inside the bedroom, they found a TEC-9 assault weapon loaded with 27 rounds of ammunition, as well as a loaded shotgun, Mirabelli said. Officers found six more loaded handguns elsewhere in the apartment, he said.

While police searched the home, two other children, ages 8 and 11, arrived and told officers that they also lived in the apartment, Mirabelli said.

The child's mother was taken into custody when she returned, he said. Charges are pending.





Guns are illegal in Chicago.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:48:09 AM EDT
My parents let me keep weapons in my room as well when I was younger. There's this one 'soccer mom' who cannot believe that my daughter (when she was as young as 12) helped me clean my firearms, sort brass, load mags, etc.

In echoing the NRA, kids are naturally curious, and if something isnt discussed, described or taught - they will gravitate towards it. My daughter does like to shoot, but the 'need' to see whats in that safe is all but removed.

One simple question threw her - "You son, whether you like it or not, will have an interest in firearms someday - who would you rather have teach him, you - or someone who knows even less?"

Partly a success story - she now lets him play with toy guns which she didnt just a year ago. I told her, when its time - I'd be more than willing to take her whole family out to the range.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:52:58 AM EDT
And now a message from one of our sponsers - btw just ordered one myself.

But for what it is worth, fully intend to have my kids in a house with a loaded, unlocked gun - it will be either be unlocked in the nightstand beside me when I go to bed or concealed with me. Otherwise it will be locked but accessable.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:55:09 AM EDT

Huge numbers of children die by drowning in swimming pools, which are CERTAINLY not something that anybody actually "needs" - (and doesn't have any consitutional protection).

Why don't all these concerned people start by banning swimming pools, and then maybe starting thinking about firearms after they've banned cars or other REALLY dangerous things?

That said, the PARENTS of kids who shoot themselves or others with the parents' firearms (because of irresponsible storage around the kids) should be thrown in jail for life. JMO.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:01:36 AM EDT
Ain't nothing more useless then an unloaded and locked gun.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:02:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:
BAN HOMES!!!!!



No, ban children.

It's for the children.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:02:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RikWriter:
I had a loaded 22 rifle in my room, next to my bed, from the time I was 13 until I could afford better.



+1

I know of at least one Kid with a loaded gun at home.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:06:24 AM EDT
They make it sound like they are little kids that don't even know it's a real gun instead of a play one. I wonder how many of these "kids" are 16+.

It's simple, if you don't teach them about guns and keep telling them they're bad, they won't know what to do when they find one.

I grew up around guns and haven't gone on a shooting spree (yet).
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:13:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
The Pediatrics report says that of 1,400 children and teens shot to death in 2002, about 90% were home when it happened.



This is a cr*p statistic. We don't know if the deaths were due to accidents or a 16 yo gang banger getting whacked on his front porch during a drive-by.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:15:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bubbles:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
The Pediatrics report says that of 1,400 children and teens shot to death in 2002, about 90% were home when it happened.



This is a cr*p statistic. We don't know if the deaths were due to accidents or a 16 yo gang banger getting whacked on his front porch during a drive-by.



Its a crap statistic cause they include suicides as gun deaths.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:15:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 7:16:48 AM EDT by HardShell]

Originally Posted By p331083:
A handgun is real useful as a defensive to if its locked away when that buglar is right outside your door.



Although I know what you're saying and agree in principle, there are plenty of devices available these days that allow secure storage AND instant access. (They are not mutually exclusive. )

(Takes a deep breath before continuing, knowing how bad he'll be flamed for daring to say this here... )

IMHO, it is irresponsible in the extreme to have loaded, unsecured firearms in a house with small children. (Yes, I understand that "studies" like this include "children" whom we would not consider children and who are old enough to be responsible around firearms - those are not the situations of which I speak nor do I defend in any way the yellow journalism at work above.)

I review child (<18 by statute, for my purposes) deaths in my state for a living. Thankfully, we do not see a lot of accidental firearms deaths among children, either in total numbers or percentages. But each one is a tragedy and most could have been prevented by safe, responsible storage.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:18:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 7:25:37 AM EDT by HardShell]

Originally Posted By mousehunter:
www.missouricarry.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/safe.jpg And now a message from one of our sponsers - btw just ordered one myself...



I did a fairly extensive review of those a while back... ETA: Found it.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:23:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 7:24:38 AM EDT by mousehunter]

Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By mousehunter:
www.missouricarry.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/safe.jpg And now a message from one of our sponsers - btw just ordered one myself...



I did a fairly extensive review of those a while back...



I read the review - sounded like something I could use. Will probably be giving a few as presents as well. There are times/places where you can not carry - and just thought something like this would be good for the car as civil lawsuite repellent incase the car is broken into. Likewise, with kids in the house, finace is not too keen on guns in the house at all - this solution will help me defend the house without fighting her. Right now the guns are all in a safe - and darn well useless if I needed one quickly.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:29:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
BAN HOMES!!!!!



No, ban children.

It's for the children.




Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:33:34 AM EDT
The best policy is to teach your kids to shoot as soon as they are able to handle it.

SBk was using a Davy Crickett at age 4, under close supervision of course. 6 years later, he handles his own CAR and 1911 more safely and more accurately than most adults. He did try to talk us into keeping his 1911 in his room, I told him it is a valuable piece and it belongs in the safe.

He used to keep his CAR cased beside the bed, with two magazines.

Education, training, and seriousness go a long way.

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