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Posted: 5/1/2009 11:53:54 PM EDT
It has rained very heavy lately, but it was dry all day today and last night.

The basement sump pump ejects the water about 2 feet out from side of the house under the deck. It was totally water logged with a large puddle under there.
It seems like the water was getting pumped out to the surface, then filtering back down to the sump pit, then getting pumped up again.

This afternoon I extended the sump outlet pipe about 25 feet in to the yard and the puddle has shifted to the lawn now.

The sump pit is still filling every 5 minutes or so with nice clear water. How long should take to drain 8 feet of soil like that?

The water is pouring in through 2 pipes/holes near the top of the pit. It's like a faucet is running.

Does that sound like a pipe is burst? The incoming water pipe is on the other side of the house, and the pressure is normal.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 12:04:39 AM EDT
[#1]
What is filling your sump pit in the basement? (Runoff?)
ETA: If you could visually inspect leakage... that would help with a description..... Also what are the "two" drain pipes coming from???
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 12:12:40 AM EDT
[#2]
Groundwater normally percolates at a rate of about an inch per day if the strata is already saturated (this doesn't count under a body of surface water like a lake, of course). If you have water from a city or other source not your own well, it's likely chlorinated. Borrow (or buy one) a chlorine test kit from someone who has a pool. If the water running in displays any residual chlorine content, it ain't just groundwater seeping in; it's a leak somewhere in your home's water system. Bad news: if the water IS a leak coming through a lot of soil before it gets to the sump, any chlorine will likely be used up in soil contact before it gets to you.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 12:22:30 AM EDT
[#3]
I don't know, there are two pipes coming in to, one pointing to the rear exterior wall beside the pump and one pointing towards the rest of the basement. The one pointing to the back wall is pouring like a faucet. The other pipe is just trickling.

The water line is in the front of the house with the meter in the of the front lawn and it's not soggy over there. The pump is at the back of the house, and the back yard around the pump is completely water logged.

I have no idea where it is coming from unless the soil can hold that much water from rain a couple of days ago? It did rain very heavy, the storm ditches were flowing full force and there is still a little bit standing water.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 12:48:54 AM EDT
[#4]
I wouldn't worry about it.  

I had that same thing in my previous house.  First couple of years it would be active every spring - clicking on every five or ten minutes for a month or two.  Then, after a few years - almost no activity any more.

Just make sure you have an alarm in case of pump failure, and a generator in case of a power failure.  My sister had her basement flooded during a power outage because the sump pump had no power.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:02:55 AM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
I don't know, there are two pipes coming in to, one pointing to the rear exterior wall beside the pump and one pointing towards the rest of the basement. The one pointing to the back wall is pouring like a faucet. The other pipe is just trickling.

The water line is in the front of the house with the meter in the of the front lawn and it's not soggy over there. The pump is at the back of the house, and the back yard around the pump is completely water logged.

I have no idea where it is coming from unless the soil can hold that much water from rain a couple of days ago? It did rain very heavy, the storm ditches were flowing full force and there is still a little bit standing water.


go turn off your water supply at the main. wait a while, then check the pipe. if the water isnt flowing anymore, its a leaky/burst pipe.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:13:47 AM EDT
[#6]
bad check valve allowing the outfall pipe to drain back when the pump turns off?
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:16:05 AM EDT
[#7]
Probably the rain. My sump hole drains every five minutes in a hard rain otherwise it's a couple of times per hour.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:21:02 AM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:
I wouldn't worry about it.  

I had that same thing in my previous house.  First couple of years it would be active every spring - clicking on every five or ten minutes for a month or two.  Then, after a few years - almost no activity any more.

Just make sure you have an alarm in case of pump failure, and a generator in case of a power failure.  My sister had her basement flooded during a power outage because the sump pump had no power.


There is a backup drain hole right next to it. Although if the pit filled that high to spill over to the drain I guess water might start seeping through the top of the floor slab?

I've seen people hookup car or marine batteries to them as a backup.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:42:19 AM EDT
[#9]
The two pipes dumping into the pit are likely the outlet from a drain that wraps around the perimiter of the wall . In other words the water is comeing through or under the foundation and the drain directs it towards the pump pit .
This sounds normal.
You were correct to extend the outlet but you might have a large amount of water that was dumped under your deck that will take a while to get pumped out away from the house.

Do you have gutter downspouts ? do they dump close to the foundation or are they directed away from the house?

Has anthing been changed ? new landscapeing ? Driveway work? Any changes that might be directing water at the house?
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 1:46:37 AM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
There is a backup drain hole right next to it. Although if the pit filled that high to spill over to the drain I guess water might start seeping through the top of the floor slab?

I've seen people hookup car or marine batteries to them as a backup.



My guess is the "back up drain hole" is actually for a sewage ejector for a basement bathroom. That's what they usually are anyways.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 2:12:57 AM EDT
[#11]
Hey neighbor, with all the rain we've been getting, my sump is running like crazy.  It is probably rainwater.

The water my sump ejects is clear as well.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 2:23:00 AM EDT
[#12]
Quoted:
Quoted:
There is a backup drain hole right next to it. Although if the pit filled that high to spill over to the drain I guess water might start seeping through the top of the floor slab?

I've seen people hookup car or marine batteries to them as a backup.



My guess is the "back up drain hole" is actually for a sewage ejector for a basement bathroom. That's what they usually are anyways.


No there is a small channel going from the pit to this drain. I suppose it is so you don't get 2 feet of water accumulating in the basement. There are plugged drains ready for a shower and toilet in another part of the basement and another one for the AC and water heater. The basement is about the only good thing with this house.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 3:41:02 AM EDT
[#13]
mine is kicking on every 45 seconds, massive rainfall here.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 3:45:07 AM EDT
[#14]
Every 5 min is a common occurance here in Michigan.

You might want to be sure your sump pump check valve is functioning properly.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 3:47:53 AM EDT
[#15]
I'd run an extension to the current sump pipe, 15+ feet from the house.

Kharn
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 3:48:00 AM EDT
[#16]
Sounds normal,  though with that rate of draining I would make sure I had a back up pump and battery to run it.  A bilge pump is a pretty inexpensive emergency back up.
Link Posted: 5/2/2009 4:01:28 AM EDT
[#17]
watch your water meter
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