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Posted: 5/2/2004 9:02:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2004 9:10:04 PM EDT by CloningBagels]
I posted a thread awhile back about Vietnam books...I'm already planning on picking a couple of those up. But, while I'm at the bookstore, I figured I may as well stock up for the summer.

I want something that's fiction...No war books please. I'll already have enough of that with the Vietnam books. I'm trying to find some more books that are in the same genre as my favorite authors, as I've already read everything by them. Chuck Palahniuk (author of Fight Club) is at the top of my list, and I'd love to find more authors that write with his same sort of twisted sense of humor. Or, really anything that will bring me to tears from laughing so hard.

Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:08:07 PM EDT
I think the "Bill the Galactic Hero" series of books from Harry Harrison are fantastic.

What I really like is that Harrison is a relaly accomplished sci-fi writer, who has won many awards and sold tons of books - and just decided to write these hilaroius and ridiculous books. It's not for everyone, but it sure makes me laugh out loud every time I read them. I think there are 6 books altogether, but each is an independent story (if you can call it that).

The hero, Bill, pretty much only has three goals in life - to get drunk, to get laid, and to get out of the army (that he was involtarily drafted into).
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:09:45 PM EDT
Allthough it's not humor, Dale Brown's Flight of the Old Dog kept me reading from cover to cover.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:11:15 PM EDT
Read Lonesome Dove. It won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and even a voracious reader will take a week or so to get through it. Amazingly well written, you get to know the characters like family. The mini series is very good as well.

I also am a big James Clavell fan, with Shogun being my favorite of his Asian saga.

Stephen Pressfield, author of Gates of Fire and Tides of War. MOLON LABE!!

Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:13:14 PM EDT
A retired Air Force Colonel named Joe Martino has written a new 2nd amendment novel called "The Justice Cooperative." This is the review I just posted on his Amazon.com page:

I'm happy to see that the Second Amendment seems to be forging its own niche as a unique genre. The first and most well-known is "Unintended Consequences" by John Ross, written in 1996. At 861 pages, UC is quite a hefty read, but it has developed a strong cult following because of its excellence. My own 2003 novel "Enemies Foreign and Domestic" is no featherweight either at 568 pages. Now we have the newest novel in the genre, "The Justice Cooperative" by Joe Martino. At 292 pages, it is by far the most accessible of the three.

“The Justice Cooperative” covers the nightmarish problem of one young married couple in a town in America. A few years earlier, they had been the victims of a home invasion by a violent criminal predator. The husband was knocked almost unconscious in the surprise attack, and his pretty wife was raped in front of him after he was tied up. The criminal was later arrested, and based on their testimony he was put in prison for an all-too-short plea-bargained sentence.

As the novel opens, the governor of the state is commuting the sentences of all prisoners who have served more than one half of their time, due to prison overcrowding. Their tormenter is freed, and begins a crafty stalking campaign, threatening to repay them for their court testimony.

The police are unwilling or unable to help the couple, because the freed criminal hasn't committed an actionable offense...yet.

In desperation, the couple purchases a pair of handguns, and takes instructional courses to learn to shoot them effectively. During this instruction, they come to realize the crucial importance of the right to keep and bear arms spelled out (not "granted") in the Second Amendment of the Bill of Rights. They learn how the law is effectively stacked against the innocent citizen, in favor of criminals. (The reader will also get a tremendous education in self-defense theory, practice and law simply by reading this book.)

The "Justice Cooperative" of the title refers to a shadowy group which works to deal with dangerous criminals the police can't—or won't—deal with, before they rape or kill even more victims. With an anonymous note, the faceless and nameless cooperative contacts the couple at a shooting range, where they have mentioned their struggle to defend themselves. The husband agrees to help the cooperative to target other violent felons, in return for later help with his own stalker. I don't want to say anything more about the plot, but I will say that "The Justice Cooperative" raises some very intriguing ideas for a covert form of vigilantism.

Along the way, "The Justice Cooperative" makes a powerful case for the continuing importance of the Second Amendment in today's society. I highly recommend this book to anyone who owns a gun for self-defense, or who has ever considered owning a gun. Because it's much shorter than “Unintended Consequences” or “Enemies Foreign and Domestic,” it may make a better initial “educational gift” for that liberal-leaning friend or relative who might be open-minded about guns for self-defense.

Technically, the "Justice Cooperative" is written at the very highest level. There are no annoying typos or clumsy construction errors to distract the reader. The well-written story will carry the reader right along to the conclusion. (I read it a couple of hours at one sitting.) Anyone who was doubtful about the importance of the right to keep and bear arms before reading "The Justice Cooperative," will have no doubts afterwards.

Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:21:00 PM EDT
Howling and tears running down the face? "Bloodsucking Fiends - A Love Story" and "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:22:36 PM EDT
Hunting Down Saddam : The Inside Story of the Search and Capture
by Robin Moore (Author)

I just finished it, not bad. Same author as "The Hunt for Bin Laden"
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:24:34 PM EDT
I really like "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".

My friends have recommended Lullaby and Choke, also by Chuck Palahniuk. I'm about 9 chapters into Lullaby, and it seems mediocre so far, but I'm hoping it'll pick up soon.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:27:14 PM EDT
If you like history, a good read is the "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich". It is a large book dealing mostly with the political problems of Eurpoe after WWI till the end of WWII. It is not a book that deals in depth with the battles, but mostly with the decisions that were made and the results. It does have some dry spots, but it will help give an understanding why many European countries are the way they are today.

Shootist.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:27:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kar98:
Howling and tears running down the face? "Bloodsucking Fiends - A Love Story" and "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore.



Ooo, I forgot about Bloodsucking Fiends. A lot of Chuck Palahniuk fanatics have recommended that to me (at times when I didn't have money to buy it). That will definatly be added to the list.

I love arfcom. These are all sounding so good. You guys are going to empty my pockets with all these great book recommendations! Keep em comin'.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:28:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:
I really like "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".

My friends have recommended Lullaby and Choke, also by Chuck Palahniuk. I'm about 9 chapters into Lullaby, and it seems mediocre so far, but I'm hoping it'll pick up soon.



I've read all three of them. Amazing stuff!
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:30:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2004 9:31:01 PM EDT by Kar98]

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:

Originally Posted By Kar98:
Howling and tears running down the face? "Bloodsucking Fiends - A Love Story" and "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore.



Ooo, I forgot about Bloodsucking Fiends. A lot of Chuck Palahniuk fanatics have recommended that to me



That's odd. I've never seen or read anything by Palahniuk
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:31:51 PM EDT
War Stories, By Ollie North is good reading
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:35:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:
I really like "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".

My friends have recommended Lullaby and Choke, also by Chuck Palahniuk. I'm about 9 chapters into Lullaby, and it seems mediocre so far, but I'm hoping it'll pick up soon.



I've read all three of them. Amazing stuff!



Wow! How old are you again?

On a more serious note - some things that Palahniuk says in Fight Club lean towards communism, so take it with a grain of salt. Excellent book, though.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:39:00 PM EDT
If you like weird horror, pick up a book of short stories by H. P . Lovecraft.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:39:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:
On a more serious note - some things that Palahniuk says in Fight Club lean towards communism, so take it with a grain of salt. Excellent book, though.



I think Palahniuk is an acquired taste. He's very anti-media. You get that theme throughout all of his books. I met him in NYC a couple years ago...The guy is just plain weird. But, incredibly sick/disturbed/hilarious in real life.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:43:56 PM EDT
Just finished this tonight.

Good book. Two thumbs up.



Link Posted: 5/2/2004 9:55:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 5:56:50 AM EDT
If you like vampire books try the Necroscope series.... best damned books I have ever read. I wish they would make them into movies.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:02:58 AM EDT
"Cryptonomicon" was entertaining.

Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:05:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By -Absolut-:
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0895261405/104-8882253-4671120?v=glance





I read this, its a complete pile of crap. It should be labeled as Fiction. Its been a long time since I read a book with so many false statements and half truths.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:12:52 AM EDT

Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:49:49 AM EDT
Mark Twain anyone?
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:57:54 AM EDT
Lucifers Hammer

The Monkeywrench Gang [or anything else by Edward Abbey]

Anything by Hunter S Thompson

The Bias Against Guns [John R Lott Jr.]

I'll post more later when I think of 'em.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 7:06:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cyanide:
www.thekamasutra.com/kama1.gif



You wanna read it with me, Cy?
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 7:20:42 AM EDT
T.R. Pearson "The Last of How it Was" or "Off for the Sweet Hereafter".

If you like Faulkner you should check Pearson out. Hysterically funny.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 9:09:42 AM EDT
Angels & Demons and The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown. And if you haven't read it yet, Unintended Consequences by John Ross is a must read.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:30:38 PM EDT
Harry Harrison's Stainless steel rat is a better series. About a criminal in the future where the criminals are "fixed" at birth. Very funny.

Hitch hikers guide to the galaxy by dougless adams, or his dirk gently holyistic detective agency is very funny as well, although a bit wierd.

Robert heinlien, star beast, have space suit will travel, are funny, though more young adult than grownup.

Christopher Stasheff if you like fantasy books, wizard in rhyme series, or her majesty's warlock.

A boy and his tank, frank leowski, also his engineer in time books.

mute by piers anthony

Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:32:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chimborazo:
Angels & Demons and The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown.



Très passé That's soooo last year ;)
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:34:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Va_Dinger:

Originally Posted By -Absolut-:
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0895261405/104-8882253-4671120?v=glance

images.amazon.com/images/P/0895261405.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg




I read this, its a complete pile of crap. It should be labeled as Fiction. Its been a long time since I read a book with so many false statements and half truths.



Care to elaborate?? I thought it was written as an expose' of CLinton's bad behavior??
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:39:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FourStringSlinger:
Lucifers Hammer



I've never been too into sci-fi books...But, I looked this one up and it sounds like something I would enjoy. I love end-of-the-world movies, but have never read a book with that theme. I'll definitely have to check this out. Thanks.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:40:56 PM EDT
"The Enemy Within" by Michael Savage
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:41:31 PM EDT
At some point in your life you’ll have to read Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand).
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:50:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By markl32:
At some point in your life you’ll have to read Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand).



I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:53:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:

Originally Posted By markl32:
At some point in your life you’ll have to read Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand).



I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.

I second Rand.
You have to. A mod told you to
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 2:53:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/3/2004 2:57:38 PM EDT by Hokie]
Suprised the ARFCOM evangelists haven't chimed in about the good book yet.

Oh well...they must be at church.

In their absence...

Since we're playing Reading Rainbow here....I'd recommend popping some mescaline and read "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" or pie the corner of your living room and read "Rumor of War" or light a candle, throw in your favorite Motley Crue cassette and check out "Maxim Magazine 2004 Hot 100"

gpn.unl.edu/rainbow/
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 3:00:44 PM EDT
Don't forget, "Patriots: Surviving the Coming Collapse".
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 3:04:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:

Originally Posted By markl32:
At some point in your life you’ll have to read Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand).



I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.



Nawww. The most boring book I ever tried to read. Filled with pompous drivel, a 200 pages monologue and no vampires whatsoever.

Kar"John who? Who the fuck cares!"98
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 3:09:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/3/2004 3:10:32 PM EDT by DoubleFeed]

Originally Posted By Kar98:

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:

Originally Posted By markl32:
At some point in your life you’ll have to read Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand).



I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.



Nawww. The most boring book I ever tried to read. Filled with pompous drivel, a 200 pages monologue and no vampires whatsoever.

Kar"John who? Who the fuck cares!"98

You didn't catch it? The brakeman was a vampire. Dagny was his gothic slut.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 3:34:05 PM EDT
Ender's Game - Orsen Scott Card An excelent and capturing read!
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 3:35:39 PM EDT


TRG
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 6:45:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Kar98:

Originally Posted By Chimborazo:
Angels & Demons and The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown.



Très passé That's soooo last year ;)



You should see my wardrobe!

As for Rand...quite possibly the most repetative shit I've ever read. She makes the same point over and over and over. You want to know what she's saying? Save yourself some time and read The Fountainhead. The rest is all the same.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 7:00:26 AM EDT
Just finished Black Hawk Down. I highly recommend it.

Currently reading the final book in the "Left Behind" series, seems like a worthy finish.

will be bringing "The hunt for Bin Laden" and "Quicksilver" with me on vacation.

btw, the Stossel book is good, a quick read, and if you don't think to yourself that a 2008 Presidential ticket of Stossel and Thomas Sowell is a good idea after you read it, I will e-punch you

jim
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 7:36:54 AM EDT
Try Andrew Vachss! He writes novels about an ex-con detective that hunts child molesters. He also has some pretty good short story collections.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 8:53:38 AM EDT
The wife has some recommendations:

Anything by Leon Uris (sp?).
A book called "Watership Down", about a society of rabbits.
"Catch-22"
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 9:49:51 AM EDT
For science fiction, I recommend anything by Philip K. Dick. One of my favorites is 'Through a Scanner Darkly'. For a good classic, I recommend 'Moby Dick', which is an easy and excellent read. Nonfiction goes to 'Bringing Down the House', by Ben Mezrich. It's an excellent book about a bunch of snotty MIT brats who took Vegas for a fortune.

My favorite tale of young male angst (not applicable in your case) is 'For Whom the Bell Tolls' by Hemmingway. I also liked Kesey's 'One Flew Over the Kookoo's Nest'. For escapist fiction, Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiiassen are hard to beat.

Since you live in my state, should you decide to read any of the books I mentioned, I would be glad to mail them to you, provided you mailed them back.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:05:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyEgo:
For science fiction, I recommend anything by Philip K. Dick. One of my favorites is 'Through a Scanner Darkly'. For a good classic, I recommend 'Moby Dick', which is an easy and excellent read. Nonfiction goes to 'Bringing Down the House', by Ben Mezrich. It's an excellent book about a bunch of snotty MIT brats who took Vegas for a fortune.

My favorite tale of young male angst (not applicable in your case) is 'For Whom the Bell Tolls' by Hemmingway. I also liked Kesey's 'One Flew Over the Kookoo's Nest'. For escapist fiction, Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiiassen are hard to beat.

Since you live in my state, should you decide to read any of the books I mentioned, I would be glad to mail them to you, provided you mailed them back.



I've read all of those except 'Through a Scanner Darkly" and "Bringing Down the House." I've actually been looking for BDTH for a couple years now. I saw a little hour-long special about it on TV, but I could never remember the name of the book that they mentioned. Thanks.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:25:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:
I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.



If Atlas is too boring for you...Rand did write some shorter/simpler stuff...you could always start with 'Anthem' and then go from there. 'We the Living'...and try Atlas again later.

Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:30:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By stimpsonjcat:

Originally Posted By CloningBagels:
I tried reading it about 8 years ago...But I got bored and have been scared to pick it back up. Now that I'm older, I'm sure I'll probably be able to get into it more.



If Atlas is too boring for you...Rand did write some shorter/simpler stuff...you could always start with 'Anthem' and then go from there. 'We the Living'...and try Atlas again later.


I'm waiting for somebody to mention that they are reading to get to the part where the blonde brakeman ravages and eats his gothic slut.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 11:01:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BlackDog714:
Ender's Game - Orsen Scott Card An excelent and capturing read!



read "Ender's Shadow" (Card) to see the same story from someone elses point of view. It is awesome.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 11:05:56 AM EDT
The Ender books were good, but you should read "Pastwatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus" if you really want a perfect story.

/OSC reader
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