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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 2/14/2006 7:36:38 AM EDT
My wife has a '97 Tercel. I replaced the fuel filter about 30k miles ago and wnet to do so again a few weeks back. That fucker was stuck on there like nobody's business. Couldn't budge it.

I had the wife call the dealer shop to see if they'd had problems with this in the past. They told here that's what it's supposed to do and unless the engine starts running oddly don;t worry about changing the fuel filter.

They said it's supposed to last the life of the car.

Link Posted: 2/14/2006 8:58:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2006 9:02:26 AM EDT by Admiral_Crunch]
Your owner's manual should have info on everything that needs to be done for regular maintenance. Is the fuel filter listed as something to replace periodically?

ETA: I just found an online maintenance guide, and it doesn't mention the fuel filter.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 9:22:55 AM EDT
Weird....
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 12:54:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 3:56:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lightning_P38:
Many cars no longer come with an inline fuel filter at all anymore. Many of those that still do, are designed to last the lifetime of the vehicle.

This reminds me of a dealer rant I have. Back in 97 I had two Neons, a 95 and a 96. The 95 has an inline filter, the 96 doesn't. I had the 96 in for a service at the dealer, the dealer called me and asked me if I wanted the fuel filter changed for the low price of $75. I told him to go ahead and do it, on the 95 the filter cost $45, and the change procedure was a PIA. It wasn't until I was reading the owners manual a couple of months later that I realized I had been ripped off hard.



Some new cars have in the tank filters, not the sock type, but an inegrated fuel filter that's part of the fuel pump housing/assembly. Those would be about as lifetime as you will see, but they can still go bad. The only problem is that it will cost ten times what a regular filter costs because you have to buy the whole assembly.

Chryslers in particular are a little different. Some have a fuel filter inline, some have the new design in tank, and others have what is called an accumulator. The accumulator looks like an inline filter and can be replaced.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:14:13 PM EDT
My '91 Acura fuel filter is located in the engine compartment and has a small bolt that would be removed to test if the filter is clogged. Same filter since I bought the car 225,000 miles.
Dealer had said to don't worry about it until you have a problem and no fuel comes out the test hole.
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:17:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 4:25:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 9:46:41 PM EDT
Either 1) Filters are getting better or 2) Fuel is getting cleaner or 3) Injectors will end up needing replacment....
Link Posted: 2/14/2006 9:53:04 PM EDT
Realistically there is no need to change your filter.
Domestic pump gas is incredibly clean, the pump nozzle also has a filter.
The only time you need to do it is when you install new injectors otherwise I've never had a fuel filter related problem.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 12:42:46 PM EDT
Most newer cars have the filter near the gas tank. IM a mechanic and theres so much screwed up info out there.
It use to be dealerships didnt want cusotmers using synthetic oil now you buy a car it has factory synthetic oil in it. So in a one year span it was a no no now its standard? heMost of the water I would say comes from the gas stations and not the refinery. You get a hard rain where water is just pouring through a gas station if the tanks arent sealed up and just have those lids with a couple of inches of raised ground to keep out water there you go.

Another peeve of mine is dealerships saying plugs shouldnt be changed under 100.000 miles. You end up burning your coil packs out due to the changing gap in the plugs. Trust me I know this.
Been there done that.
I work for a private owned shop that is one of the last honest garages you can find and were off in the middle of no where and by word of mouth we stay busy.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 12:32:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lightning_P38:
Many cars no longer come with an inline fuel filter at all anymore. Many of those that still do, are designed to last the lifetime of the vehicle.

This reminds me of a dealer rant I have. Back in 97 I had two Neons, a 95 and a 96. The 95 has an inline filter, the 96 doesn't. I had the 96 in for a service at the dealer, the dealer called me and asked me if I wanted the fuel filter changed for the low price of $75. I told him to go ahead and do it, on the 95 the filter cost $45, and the change procedure was a PIA. It wasn't until I was reading the owners manual a couple of months later that I realized I had been ripped off hard.



The '96 and later Neons (plastic fuel tank) use a combination fuel pressure regulator and fuel filter that is mounted into the top of the fuel pump housing.

It's possible to change, but most parts places don't realize that you look up the fuel pressure regulator and NOT under "fuel filter".

They are designed for "life of car" but most people I know change them between 150000 and 200000 miles. I'm at about 100000 miles with no sign of high engine speed fuel starvation.

Jim
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:03:02 AM EDT
my old 1989 Supra Turbo had a fuel filter right in front of the tank, the maintenance manuals never listed it as an item to change, the filter was over $50 for a replacement. I agree with the dealer on this one, it wasn't designed to be changed unless it needed to be.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:15:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 12:41:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 1:05:17 PM EDT
I have seen vehicles go over 100K... strike that, over 120K miles with the stock filter and still running strong.
If you car is running fine, no need to change it.
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