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Posted: 9/11/2004 10:07:15 PM EST
Gun ban will expire Monday night By KEVIN PURDY
kevinpurdy@sanduskyregister.com

SANDUSKY

Barring any last-ditch efforts by Congress, a 10-year-old federal ban on 19 types of assault weapons will expire at midnight Monday.

That means arms manufacturers will once again be able to make and sell Uzis, AK-47s and TEC-9 pistols, and regular citizens, with the proper permits and licenses, can buy them.

In Ohio, some of those assault weapons are already banned under state law. And in the Sandusky area, law enforcement officials said their availability may not have much of an impact on how they fight crime.

Perkins police Chief Tim McClung said the original ban had little effect on reducing gun violence and crime because it targeted the wrong kinds of weapons.

"The types of weapons they banned are not the type you see in crimes," McClung said. "A criminal isn't going to buy one of those, they're going to get an inexpensive gun for $50. In my opinion, they banned the Cadillacs of guns, but the Chevettes continue to be available."

McClung acknowledged he is "probably one of the few police chiefs not in favor of extending the ban," noting that the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police and other organizations have supported an extension.

Erie County Sheriff Terry Lyons, however, said it would be "hard to come to a consensus" on whether the ban had an effect on reducing shootings or other gun-related crimes.

"From one standpoint, it did create an awareness of problems with things like silencers and high-capacity magazines," Lyons said. "But these guns were still available at gun shows, and they could still make slightly altered versions of them."

To Erie County Prosecutor Kevin Baxter, however, weaknesses in the initial law are no reason to let it expire. He pointed to two local high-profile cases -- the 1994 murder of Vivian Johnson with a TEC-9 pistol and the 1988 murder of David Hartlaub with a modified Cobrey M-11 -- as evidence.

"I want to make it more difficult for criminals to get these kinds of weapons," Baxter said. "Maybe if a ban had been in place before these murders, they might not have been able to use those kinds of weapons."

Don Cole, owner of Associated Gunsmiths on Tiffin Avenue, said he's had a number of inquiries from customers about what kind of weapons they can buy after the ban expires, and one of his suppliers recently told him he'd purchased $26,000 worth of high-capacity magazines, anticipating a jump in demand.

But Cole said he expects marksmen and other enthusiasts to buy them. The cost for such weapons, he said, is too much for the average criminal.

"I don't even discuss a firearm if it's under $100, because there's no reason for it," Cole said. "The criminal element doesn't go to a store or a gun shop. People who invest in these kinds of weapons also invest in training, education and keeping them locked up."

Ohio House Minority Leader Chris Redfern, D-Catawba Island, supports the ban, but also had "some ambivalence" on the issue, in part because other issues have proved more pressing.

"I understand this issue is very important in urban centers, where these types of weapons do get into criminal hands," Redfern said. "But right now, I'm more concerned with health care issues and seeing that children aren't left behind in education."
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 10:28:09 PM EST
"From one standpoint, it did create an awareness of problems with things like silencers and high-capacity magazines," Lyons said. "But these guns were still available at gun shows, and they could still make slightly altered versions of them."

that's rich... come monday i'll be taking out a loan to snap up as many silencers as i can buy.
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 10:29:37 PM EST
Sounds like an interesting story....thought I just browsed at it fast.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 1:10:40 AM EST
Hey, furball.
Thanks for the story.
I'm originally from Bellevue.
Nice to see liberalism encroaching on my old playground.
At least the police they talked to weren't completely caught up in rhetoric.
Even if the prosecutor was unaware of the details of the law he was so concerned about.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 1:55:13 AM EST
Good article.


Points out

1. Criminals don't use $700+ guns

2. The ban actually DID NOT ban any firearm. Just certain cosmetic features.

3. Police chiefs don't know JACK about what the ban was really about (silencers

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:45:04 AM EST
"Maybe if a ban had been in place before these murders, they might not have been able to use those kinds of weapons."

Of course not... they would have murdered using some other gun they could get. The murderer would still be a murderer, the victim still a victim.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:02:55 AM EST
Sweet.... In less than 15 hours i can toss on a can. I guess no more tax stamp or 6 month backgroud check. If i worked for any department that made a statement like that i think i just might transfer.

J
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:08:46 AM EST

That means arms manufacturers will once again be able to make and sell Uzis, AK-47s and TEC-9 pistols, and regular citizens, with the proper permits and licenses, can buy them.


Is that what its like in Ohio?


Let's give a hand to Perkins police Chief Tim McClung. We should have more reasonably thinking LE leaders in this country.

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:13:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 4:14:08 AM EST by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By Palo_Duro:

That means arms manufacturers will once again be able to make and sell Uzis, AK-47s and TEC-9 pistols, and regular citizens, with the proper permits and licenses, can buy them.


Is that what its like in Ohio?


Let's give a hand to Perkins police Chief Tim McClung. We should have more reasonably thinking LE leaders in this country.



No, that's a lie. I sure didn't need a license.

Hmm. . . Unless he's trying to connect the AWB with FA. That would be typical.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 7:39:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By garandman:
Good article.


Points out

1. Criminals don't use $700+ guns

2. The ban actually DID NOT ban any firearm. Just certain cosmetic features.

3. Police chiefs don't know JACK about what the ban was really about (silencers




Silencers. Obviosly these police chiefs have never read the Ohio Revised Code which classifies "Silencers" as a dangerous ordnance and there for are prohibted for general public ownership. But, what do cops know about gun laws anyway....
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