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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 9/30/2011 7:15:09 PM EST
Wife is in nursing school, and we're in the process of finding a concealable for her... she's curious about how often violent crime is experienced in hospitals, and more so, how often a firearm is needed.

I told her the emergency department will probably be the most dangerous, and that most situations probably don't involve CCW's

Her main question though is whether or not it is generally acceptable to conceal carry in a hospital...?

Thanks guys!
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:21:15 PM EST
Most hospitals have a no-go policy on CCW. Speaking from just personal experience, violence is very common in the ER, but it's not the sort that would require a gun (I never thought I'd say this). If nothing else, it's a liability if the psych and/or otherwise agitated patient finds it by accident - the situation would escalate dramatically. I would endorse having it in the breakroom close by in case of a violent armed individual showing up, but I think it's more than it's worth to carry it on one's person all the time. Also, scrubs makes concealing most things difficult...
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:22:27 PM EST
Depends on the hospital. Out little community hospital is fairly quiet. The trauma center that's in a bad part of town is quite a different story.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:30:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:32:20 PM EST by OiRogers]
I've been at an ER with a trauma patient... Had a shooting victim in bed on either side of my patient... Then the families Of those patients showed up.... Never been happier to have been armored and armed in an ER.
Luck of the draw had put those two "patients" (I.e. Drug dealers who shot each other during a deal fine bad) on either side of my (LEO) and my dipshit prisoner (Felony DV who had stabbed his wife....)

That was about the least fun fourth-three seconds of my life. Then the hospital PD showed up and took over the de-escalation of that cluster. My prisoner got transferred to a private room with a quickness.

I highly recommend being armed and armored in the ER if legally possible.

ETA: my drunk ass wasted post 1911 on this? FUCK ME. . Anyhow.... Colt GoldCup Series 70 Pic here....
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:43:47 PM EST
It's illegal in Texas. No violent crimes allowed in our hospitals either.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:43:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By OiRogers:
I've been at an ER with a trauma patient... Had a shooting victim in bed on either side of my patient... Then the families Of those patients showed up.... Never been happier to have been armored and armed in an ER.
Luck of the draw had put those two "patients" (I.e. Drug dealers who shot each other during a deal fine bad) on either side of my (LEO) and my dipshit prisoner (Felony DV who had stabbed his wife....)

That was about the least fun fourth-three seconds of my life. Then the hospital PD showed up and took over the de-escalation of that cluster. My prisoner got transferred to a private room with a quickness.

I highly recommend being armed and armored in the ER if legally possible.

ETA: my drunk ass wasted post 1911 on this? FUCK ME. . Anyhow.... Colt GoldCup Series 70 Pic here....


That sounds like a Great post for number 1911.




Impeach Obama for the Good of the Hoods.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:48:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By The_Breakfast_Fox:
Most hospitals have a no-go policy on CCW. Speaking from just personal experience, violence is very common in the ER, but it's not the sort that would require a gun (I never thought I'd say this). If nothing else, it's a liability if the psych and/or otherwise agitated patient finds it by accident - the situation would escalate dramatically. I would endorse having it in the breakroom close by in case of a violent armed individual showing up, but I think it's more than it's worth to carry it on one's person all the time. Also, scrubs makes concealing most things difficult...

I work in an ER from time to time, and in an urgent care clinic. A few drug addicts, psychopaths, and people with severe mental problems can cause problems quickly. If in doubt, get hospital security or the cops in there first.

For example, I was in clinic, and was called to see a patient in the ER (very rural town. Only 8-10 ER patients daily). It was a person with whom we'd had narcotic related issues before. As I was about to head to the ER, the nurse called and said that patient was pacing around the ER and loudly stating, "If I don't get any percocets like my dad gets, there's gonna be trouble."

So, I stopped and called the dispatcher and a deputy appeared a couple of minutes later, as we have a very good relationship with the local Sheriff's dept. The deputy walked into the ER and leaned on the counter and shot the breeze with the nurse, all in full view of the patient. He never said one word to the patient.

When I saw the patient, he was, "Yes sir. No sir. Three bags full sir." I declined to prescribe percocet and he left.

The moral is: Get security/LEO involved early and often in the ER. If you feel threatened, uncomfortable, or if the patient is acting "hinky", get up and leave. Make an excuse if you need, and get out. Get security in there. Check out the book "The Gift of Fear". It has many good lessons about workplace violence, including predicting likely violence. A great read, and it should be on every ARFCommer's bookshelf.

With regards to the no CCW rule, I know some ER workers who believe in the Don't Ask-Don't Tell policy. The major hospitals in my residency had metal detectors going into the ER. Patients go through the detector. Staff doesn't. Think about it.

Words to live by.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:51:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By Assault-Rifle-City:
Wife is in nursing school, and we're in the process of finding a concealable for her... she's curious about how often violent crime is experienced in hospitals, and more so, how often a firearm is needed.

I told her the emergency department will probably be the most dangerous, and that most situations probably don't involve CCW's

Her main question though is whether or not it is generally acceptable to conceal carry in a hospital...?

Thanks guys!


LEOs are frowned upon carrying in a hospital (while not on duty) around here.

I can't imagine that an employee would be any different in a state that allows carrying.

Just becareful.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:54:15 PM EST
All that work for a nursing degree, which is a pain in the ass by the way, just to lose it all by breaking policy by carrying? I carry everywhere, but I've never felt uncomfortable not carrying in the hospital. I know things happen, especially in certain ERs, but I can guarantee that getting caught will "kill" a job and likely potential jobs if fired.
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