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Posted: 7/2/2012 8:20:45 PM EDT
As the subject says, I am going to be starting towards getting my pilots license. The plan is to work my way up to Multi-Commercial and Multi-Instructor so the cost is quite significant when its all said and done (in the neighborhood of $45,000) and I was just wondering if there is anybody on here that is doing the same thing or has gone through this. I know there will be people that will say join the military they'll teach you, even though I respect those people, thats just not something thats for me at this time.  Any helpful advice on financing such an endeavor would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance!
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 10:56:11 PM EDT
[#1]
Tag
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 10:59:06 PM EDT
[#2]
Head over to the Aviation forum


Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:00:31 PM EDT
[#3]
ugh

(headache)
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:23:05 PM EDT
[#4]
Its actually a certificate! And my advice is to fly for fun and not for a living!
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:34:22 PM EDT
[#5]
No experts but from what I've seen and heard commercial pilots make jack shit
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:37:45 PM EDT
[#6]
If you have the cash up front to pay for it, then have fun!  Fly often, study hard, and you'll have a great time.  If not, and you need to finance it, read on.

I did it.  Do it fast, and save money where you can when you're building time.  Split time during the instrument/commercial cross-country time building part.  That time was my most memorable but most expensive.  Split time, split time, split time.  Keep the joyrides for friends and family to a minimum.  It's gonna be more than 45k, unless you're flying in a friend's plane for less cost.  The more often you fly, the sooner you'll get your licenses in fewer hours.  Fly at LEAST two days a week.  Any less is a waste of time and will only cost you more money in the long run.  Flying three days a week will keep you sharp, you'll learn better and easier, and your flight instructor will be more motivated too.  If he gives you homework or something to study, do it.  This isn't something to drag your feet and slack off in.

Don't give your chunk of money to the flight school up front.  Pay for it in a couple/few thousand at a time.  Any schools that demand payment in full up front aren't worth attending, no matter the sleazy sales pitch or "guarantee".  For every good flight school out there, there are five that are filled with crooks and con artists.  Look up Silver State Helicopters, they're a good example of conning thousands of students out of millions of dollars.  Be careful.  Consider a flight school attached to a state-run college.  There will be tuition, sure, but it will still often end up being cheaper and more reliable.

On that note, if you finance, don't do private student loans, for any reason.  Take advantage of federal loans, work and save money, try to win big in Vegas, whatever.  Avoid private student loans like the plague.  They'll own you.  Clark Howard actually has some really good info on student loans that you should consider reading up on before you sign your life away.

You're going to make dick for pay, for years, unless you score something unusual...which, you won't.  Flight instructing pays little enough to qualify for every welfare program, WIC, etc.  Being an FO at an airline isn't much better.  You'll likely make around $20k your first year or two, give or take a couple grand.  I hope you have sat down and looked at your student/flight loan interest rates, repayment term/years, and seen what you're going to be paying per month in repayment.  

If I could do it all over again?  Since I did it in college, I would have gotten into ROTC.  All of my friends that were in the aviation program that were also in the ROTC program got flight slots in the air force.  I got laid off in 08 and got into a different field and haven't logged time since, and I hate that.  I'd give anything to be able to be flying again right now, but it just hasn't worked out that way. I'm paying my loans off right now, and they're no joke.  I make good money in my current field, so I can afford them, but I don't see how I could have continued to afford them making $30-35k a year, in a regional airline, a couple years later.  

The industry is not short on pilots, no matter what some dipshit tells you while he's trying to justify his existence or sell you on his flight school. It's bullshit.  "With all the baby-boomers retiring there's going to be a shortage of pilots!"  There are 50 pilots for every job opening out there, the industry knows it, that's partly why they get paid so little.  You're not going to be in demand.  Ever.

It's not all doom and gloom, of course.  The first time I flew for hire and made a (tiny) paycheck from it, it was the greatest feeling in the world.  I miss it.  I'll get back into it eventually but I can't afford to go back to making $20k/year at this point.

email or im me if you have any questions.
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:40:26 PM EDT
[#7]
I did this for 3 years, right up until Gas Prices skyrocketed and I said screw it its cheaper to buy an old cessna 152 than finish.


Pay attention to the instructors. What do they drive? What kind of houses do they live in? How many years have they been training kids just to get enough flight hours to have a decent job? They all were all poor miserable chain smokers as far as I could tell.





My instructor had been training students at the university for more than 8 years, drove an old truck and lived in a trailer. He eventually left to start working as a commercial pilot for some company. He was back within a year. He quit flying altogether because of financial reasons and got a good job working for a phone company or something.





He only made about $20 an hour, and that was only if the plane was up in the air flying with a student. If the student didn't show up or the weather was bad he didn't get jack. Most of his day was waiting around the hanger waiting on kids that never showed up for their lesson.





I'd count on spending about 10 years of your life being poor and flying students around, then maybe you'll have enough hours to catch a decent break. There are plenty of people doing just that, that would be in line to get a job before someone fresh out of school. It also helps if you know the right people.





Also for every hour in the air, expect to do about about an hour of stuff on the ground, checking weather, flight plans, inspecting airplanes .etc Its fun and exciting for the first year after that its a job.




 
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:49:20 PM EDT
[#8]
have fun, look into cargo companies. still money there. the one I work for is very good to its employees, from pilots to ground personel
Link Posted: 7/2/2012 11:52:43 PM EDT
[#9]
Oh, get a first class physical before you take any flight training or any financing. Not third class. Not second class. First class physical.  Make sure you can get it before you spend a lot of money. It's a shame to see people get licenses on their second class and then not be able to get a first for some unforeseen reason.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 12:51:05 AM EDT
[#10]
Do you have any idea how many unemployed, and under employed pilots there are?



My brother did the same thing you plan to do. Twenty five years ago.



He never got a halfway decent job as a pilot.



He once answered an ad that honestly stated: Horrible hours. Worse pay. Build up your twin engine time. It paid $2 more than minimum wage.



Really.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 1:42:27 AM EDT
[#11]
We have tons of commercial pilots here.    
I did exactly what you are proposing a couple decades ago.  Even then, it was expensive.  
I think you will find it is substantially more money and time than you think.
A couple thoughts:  Do NOT believe the claims of any flight schools.  They have an agenda.
Do NOT believe in the coming "Pilot Shortage!!!"     It's an industry joke.  A lie that's been told since the Wright brothers.
Finance it with rich parents, or a rich wife.    90% of successful pilots start out with one or the other, I shit you not.
The other 10% (the crazy bastards like me) occasionally succeed, but only by dedicating every moment of their entire life to it.



Generally speaking, it is worth it, only if you have no other alternatives.
 
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 2:20:08 AM EDT
[#12]
I'm picking up an underlying theme to all these replies
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 2:25:02 AM EDT
[#13]
If you really want to go pro, then join the military.

Think about it:
You are going to shell out booku bucks and have a few hundred hours of time.  The other applicant is going to be former military, no debt from flying lessons, and oh yeah will have THOUSANDS of hours in high performance aircraft flown in high stress situations with a highly regimented, structured employer.

Which candidate is the airline going to go with?

Now, if you want to be a flight instructor, or a bush pilot or something yeah.  But trust me.  I and all the civilian pilots I knew when I was flying were competing against .mil pilots for jobs.  And this was mid-90s, we only had Desert Storm vets to go up against.  You have 10 years of two different wars cranking out a lot of pilots with a bazillion hours on their logs...
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:03:39 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
As the subject says, I am going to be starting towards getting my pilots license. The plan is to work my way up to Multi-Commercial and Multi-Instructor so the cost is quite significant when its all said and done (in the neighborhood of $45,000) and I was just wondering if there is anybody on here that is doing the same thing or has gone through this. I know there will be people that will say join the military they'll teach you, even though I respect those people, thats just not something thats for me at this time.  Any helpful advice on financing such an endeavor would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance!


If you want to make a living as an airline pilot.

Go into the the trades or some good paying career field.
Learn to fly from an old instructor as the young ones just want to build their flight time.   Cost $10000
Buy a small airplane like a Cessna 172 or Piper Archer. Cost $50000
Buy a uniform from Sportys.  Cost $100
Take your friends flying and make announcements to them in your "pilot-voice" while you fly them to get a burger.
Have them buy you lunch.

Congratulations you are not better off then most airline pilots.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_147/1182657_So_you_want_to_be_a_pilot__FAQ.html


Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:15:02 AM EDT
[#15]




A Pilot’s Life… Ain’t it great?




- 22 years old: Graduated from college. Go to military flight school. Become hot shot pilot. Get married.

- 25 years old: Have 1st kid. Now hotshot jock getting shot at in war.

- Just want to get back to USA in one piece. Get back to USA as primary flight instructor pilot.

- Get bored. Volunteer for war again.

- 29 years old: Get back from war all tuckered out. Want out of military.

- 30 years old: Join airline. World is your oyster.

- 31 years old: Buy flashy car, house and lots of toys. Get over the military poverty feeling.

- 32 years old: Divorce boring 1st wife. Pay child support and maintenance. Drink lots of booze and screw around while looking for 2nd wife.

- 33 years old: Furloughed from airline. Join military reserve unit and fly for fun.

- Repeat above for a few more years.

- 35 years old: Airline recall. More screwing around but looking forward to a good marriage and settling down.

- 36 years old: Marry young spunky 25 year old flight attendant.

- 37 years old: Buy another house. Gave first one to first wife.

- 38 years old: Give in to second wife to have more kids. Father again. Wife concerned about "risky" military Reserve flying so you resign commission.

- 39 years old: Now a Captain. Hooray! Upgrade house, buy boat, small single engine airplane and even flashier cars.

- 42 years old: 2nd wife runs off with wealthy investment banker but still wants to share house (100%).

- 43 years old: Settle with wife # 2 and resolve to stay away from women forever. Seek a position as a flight check Captain for 10% pay override to pay mounting bills. Move into 1 bedroom apartment with window air conditioners.

- 44 years old: Company resizes and you're returned to copilot status. 25% pay cut. Become simulator instructor for 10% override pay.

- 49 years old: Captain again. Move into 2-bedroom luxury apartment with central air conditioning.

- 50 years old: Meet sexy Danish model on International trip. She loves you and says you are very "beeeeg!"

- 51 years old: Marry sexy Danish model for wife #3. Buy big house, boat, twin engine airplane and upgrade cars.

- 52 years old: Sexy model wants kids (not again). Resolve to get vasectomy.

- 54 years old: Try to talk wife out of kids, but presto, she's pregnant. She says she got sick after taking the pill. Accident, sorry, won't happen again.......

- 55 years old: Father of triplets!

- 56 years old: Wife #3 wants very beeeeg house, beeeegger boat and very flashy cars, "worried" about your private flying and wants you to sell twin engine airplane. You give in. You buy a motorcycle and join motorcycle club.

- 57 years old: Make rash investments to try and have enough money for retirement.

- 59 years old: Lose money on rash investment and get audited by the IRS. Have to fly 100% International night trips just to keep up with child support and alimony to wife #1 and #2.

- 60 years old: Wife #3 (sexy model) says you're too damned old and no fun. She leaves. She takes most of your assets. You're forced to retire due to Age 60 rule. No money left.

- 61 years old: Now Captain on a non-schedule South American 727 freight outfit and living in a non-air conditioned studio apartment directly underneath the final approach to runway 9 at Miami Int'l. You have "interesting" Hispanic neighbors who ask you if you've ever flown DC-3's.

- 65 years old: Fail FAA medical. Take job as simulator instructor. Don't look forward to years of getting up at 2 AM for 3 AM sim in every god-forsaken town you train in due to the fact your carrier can find cheap, off-hours sim time at various Brand X Airlines.

- 70 years old: Hotel alarm clock set by previous FedEx crew member goes off at 1:00 AM. Have heart attack and die with smile on face.

- Happy at last!

- Ain't aviation great?!
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:25:54 AM EDT
[#16]
I graduated from college with my multi instrument license and a degree in Aviation Flight. If you need info or advice PM me.   In short though unless you have some serious aviation connections it's a questionable move. I made more as a brand new Army E4 than I would have as a new commercial pilot. Although my job offer in flight was going to be flying seaplanes between Caribbean islands haha.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:26:01 AM EDT
[#17]
Quoted:
As the subject says, I am going to be starting towards getting my pilots license. The plan is to work my way up to Multi-Commercial and Multi-Instructor so the cost is quite significant when its all said and done (in the neighborhood of $45,000) and I was just wondering if there is anybody on here that is doing the same thing or has gone through this. I know there will be people that will say join the military they'll teach you, even though I respect those people, thats just not something thats for me at this time.  Any helpful advice on financing such an endeavor would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance!


I used to love flying...not to sound negative, but for me it got old fast. It was a money sink and I realized that I didn't enjoy it enough to continue on....my plan was to be a CFI since I originally enjoyed it so much. Unlike most who get into flying, I didn't have dreams of flying airliners...I just wanted to teach something hat I loved to do even if I didn't make a lot of money doing it.
One day I realized that I wasn't having as much fun as I used to so I took a "break" from flying. As time went on I found that I just didn't have the same love and excitement for flying that I used to have.

So I woul second some of the advice above. Fly because you love to fly, not because you have to. Don't go into debt learning to fly, pay cash as you go. If you start to feel that it isn't for you then reevaluate your situation as necessary.

If you contine to love flying as a career ( lots of people do) then go for it! It is a long road but can be very rewarding!
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:46:35 AM EDT
[#18]
Quoted:
As the subject says, I am going to be starting towards getting my pilots license. The plan is to work my way up to Multi-Commercial and Multi-Instructor so the cost is quite significant when its all said and done (in the neighborhood of $45,000) and I was just wondering if there is anybody on here that is doing the same thing or has gone through this. I know there will be people that will say join the military they'll teach you, even though I respect those people, thats just not something thats for me at this time.  Any helpful advice on financing such an endeavor would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance!



Do you already have a college degree?  If you want a job with a major airline you will need one.  So look at several of the schools that have aviation programs.  Auburn, Purdue are two off the top of my head.  There is Embry Riddle in Florida and Arizona.  If you already have a 4 year degree there are some schools that have associations with different regional carriers.  The question becomes why do you want to do this.  To give you more advice need more info.  

Good Luck

Sparkvark
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 3:55:18 AM EDT
[#19]
Yeah fuck that.

I started down that road and said fuck that.  

I did have a fun career in aviation - on the ground.  I actually made some money, and got to fly a lot.  It was actually fun and I've logged time in a lot of different aircraft, and have been to a lot of fun destinations.

I've since left the industry.  While there are fair paying jobs in aviation there just isn't thst much money to be made.  For example an aircraft mechanic may make $50K a year, a car mechanic can make much more at a high end dealership.

The people making money off of aviation either workfor law firms or oil companies.

Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:03:57 AM EDT
[#20]
Back in 1996 it cost me around 3500-5000 to get my private.  It is now about 10K .  If you are doing all that for 45K, more power to you, that is pretty far ahead of the curve already.  Do you have a line on cheap a/c or fuel?
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:14:09 AM EDT
[#21]
A different thing to consider as well: can you make money from flying but by doing something else?

I knew a lawyer once who advanced his business by flying to places in his small airplane. He probably, most certainly had his commercial rating (had been a senior Army aviator, helos).

He termed himself as a commercial pilot as oppose to a professional pilot. He did not make his living by flying but used flying as a tool to advance his livelihood.

I'm a diver and I can use that as a tool for a boss. Need to know what the situation is like "down there"? I can go there, do that, and come back with a report so he knows as if he was there (the last being something I learned in intelligence).

Think about it.
______________________________________________________________________________________
("Fly, Robin, Fly!"––lyrics, (w,stte), "(same)" by Silver Convention)
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:22:39 AM EDT
[#22]
The big question for the OP is why?
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:23:05 AM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:
Back in 1996 it cost me around 3500-5000 to get my private.  It is now about 10K .  If you are doing all that for 45K, more power to you, that is pretty far ahead of the curve already.  Do you have a line on cheap a/c or fuel?


I'm pretty sure it would run you closer to 75k to be remotely competitive in the marketplace.  I'll do you a big favor.....give me 5k, I'll kick you in the balls a couple of times, you'll come out ahead.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:27:58 AM EDT
[#24]
I used to work with a Regional Jet pilot, Embry Riddle grad , on furlough making $12 an hour as a guard. Waiting to be recalled. He is back flying now. He looked and got a few offers from small scary far eastern airlines. He was almost $82k in debt knew to much about std's and loved his lifestyle. He drove a Saturn with no reverse.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:33:15 AM EDT
[#25]
When I got my private late 80s early 90s it cost me about $3500 so not sure how you get to where you want for $45000.   Had a kid bought a house and wife went part time in 1993.  I flew last on my birthday that year.  Just couldn't afford it and the cost per hour was about 1/3 to 1/4 of what it is now.   Most of the guys I know that went commercial flew checks around at night or cargo.  The few that made it were copilots making peanuts forever.  Sure as a captain you might make decent money at some point but think about your average pay over the years to get there.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:39:24 AM EDT
[#26]
I have been an instructor for 25 years both privately and I ran a large international flight scchool.  My advice...
If you are seriious about it, buy a Piper Archer or Arrow.  They can be found for incredibly low prices, are forgiving and easy to fly and insurance and maintenance  isn't too bad.  This is especially good if you can hook it up with a business you may,,,, own..  Hire a private instructor who has experience.  Ask around at the local airports.  You will find out quick who to hire.  Your investments and cost will be a monthly payment, fuel and the instructor. An annual inspection will run you maybe $2-3 thousand.  Budget y Get your private, instrument and if you can buy an arrow, commercial.  Then you can sell your plane, hopefully for a little profit to help cover some of the fuel you paid for and you won't come out too bad on cost.  Then just do a quick course offered through a school for multi-engine.  You will be hard pressed to find private multi stuff.  

As many have said, don't do this for a living!  You will be sorry.  I have flown for 4 airlines so far and 3 have gone out of business.  The glory of an airline job only lasts a few months.  If you really enjoy it, get your instructor ratings and do it on the side of your regular job.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:39:32 AM EDT
[#27]
In today's world, there is no such thing as a "pilot".  There are kids who can program an FMC, yes, but should it come down to stick and rudder?  Forget about it.  That is a lost art.

Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:42:30 AM EDT
[#28]
I attempted what your doing in 2001 after high school.  Then I ran out of money and decided I didn't want to be a flight instructor making shit money while waiting to get hired by an airline.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 4:47:44 AM EDT
[#29]
I remember back in early 2000's a really good friend of mine moved down to Orlando to go to a flight school there. Got out the loans and paid for the full program only to see the school shut its doors and declare bankruptcy right after my buddy got his private pilot's wings. It's been touch and go ever since, going from some program in Arizona to taking a (civilian) job flying into Iraq / Afghanistan as late as last year. The process of getting all your ratings and getting enough jet flight time under your belt along with the future of aviation is something to think hard about.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 7:39:45 AM EDT
[#30]
I'm still finding random subforums as I go along so I must have missed the aviation one. But I will have to give that a good look over.

I have enough time in my life to fly 3 to 4 days a week with school and my job.

No the flight school does not require all money up front, this is just the base estimation of what it will cost by the FAA certified flight school. I will be repaying this as I go when I can throw money at it and not taking the full amount out at one time.

After completion of the program I have looked into the job market and even though it is somewhat (very) bleak I have realistic expectations and know it'll be about 20k a year at best for a long awhile.

The flight school I have chosen to go through did not blow smoke up my ass and has told me pretty much everything that you guys have told me here as well.

Over all the reason I want to do this is because I love flying, I've got about 10 hours already. I feel as if I could do this without hating my life even if I make jack sh!t for pay.

What I am gathering from all the responses is that some (most) of your lives as pilots sucked and that the others were lucky and got a decent job, thats like any other career in this world. With the way the job markets are now might as well try for something I think I enjoy, When I make it to my private pilots certificate and realize I cant do this anymore much less for a large portion of my life then I'm only out the cost of a cheap used car or so.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 8:15:41 AM EDT
[#31]
Quoted:
I'm still finding random subforums as I go along so I must have missed the aviation one. But I will have to give that a good look over.

I have enough time in my life to fly 3 to 4 days a week with school and my job.

No the flight school does not require all money up front, this is just the base estimation of what it will cost by the FAA certified flight school. I will be repaying this as I go when I can throw money at it and not taking the full amount out at one time.

After completion of the program I have looked into the job market and even though it is somewhat (very) bleak I have realistic expectations and know it'll be about 20k a year at best for a long awhile.

The flight school I have chosen to go through did not blow smoke up my ass and has told me pretty much everything that you guys have told me here as well.

Over all the reason I want to do this is because I love flying, I've got about 10 hours already. I feel as if I could do this without hating my life even if I make jack sh!t for pay.

What I am gathering from all the responses is that some (most) of your lives as pilots sucked and that the others were lucky and got a decent job, thats like any other career in this world. With the way the job markets are now might as well try for something I think I enjoy, When I make it to my private pilots certificate and realize I cant do this anymore much less for a large portion of my life then I'm only out the cost of a cheap used car or so.


Good, as long as you go into it with your eyes wide open.  I have had some really great jobs and some f-ing miserable ones.  One thing that is a constant is that there is no security, I accept that.  I wouldn't trade it for any other career, but it is a roller coaster––––-good luck
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 8:52:57 AM EDT
[#32]
I did this back 20+ years ago.   Wasn't cheap then and sure isn't now.

So once you've got your all your certificates whats the plan.  CFI till you get the ATP?  I presume you are aware of the new requirements for an ATP certificate to fly for a Pt. 121 airline next year.  The ATP requires a minimum of 1500hrs.

Have you figured out how much CFIs make and how much you'll make at a regional airline of Part 135 job the next several years after that.  If you haven't I'll give you a hint, the pay absolutely sucks.  I'd imagine the payment, if you can get financing, on 45K would be at least $1000 a month.  That will be a significant portion of your income.  You'll want to put some of it aside for the furloughs and the bankruptcy attorney.

As some with 14 years in the industry, I can't recommended for anyone.  My kids are smart enough to want to do something different,  but If they say they want to become pilots I'll kick them in the ass.  But if you must continue in this endeavor, as someone else posted, buy an aircraft.  An IFR capable 172 or PA-28.  Do everything you can in it, then sell it.

Joining the military, for the GI bill, which could pay for the flight training would be something to look into also.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 8:54:59 AM EDT
[#33]
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 10:47:36 AM EDT
[#34]
I also have to say I hope you enjoy being poor for at least 8-10 years!
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 10:53:51 AM EDT
[#35]
Quoted:
I'm still finding random subforums as I go along so I must have missed the aviation one. But I will have to give that a good look over.

I have enough time in my life to fly 3 to 4 days a week with school and my job.

No the flight school does not require all money up front, this is just the base estimation of what it will cost by the FAA certified flight school. I will be repaying this as I go when I can throw money at it and not taking the full amount out at one time.

After completion of the program I have looked into the job market and even though it is somewhat (very) bleak I have realistic expectations and know it'll be about 20k a year at best for a long awhile.

The flight school I have chosen to go through did not blow smoke up my ass and has told me pretty much everything that you guys have told me here as well.

Over all the reason I want to do this is because I love flying, I've got about 10 hours already. I feel as if I could do this without hating my life even if I make jack sh!t for pay.

What I am gathering from all the responses is that some (most) of your lives as pilots sucked and that the others were lucky and got a decent job, thats like any other career in this world. With the way the job markets are now might as well try for something I think I enjoy, When I make it to my private pilots certificate and realize I cant do this anymore much less for a large portion of my life then I'm only out the cost of a cheap used car or so.


And that right there boys and girls is why pilots on average make jack shit for pay! Dude its a job, career, profession what ever you want to call it! You get into it because you want to make money and get paid like any other profession!

Link Posted: 7/3/2012 11:03:25 AM EDT
[#36]
I have been flying professionally for about five years.

Three were as a CFI making <20K a year. Went to the food bank every two weeks.
Eighteen months as OOTSK, making <30K a year. Worked for two companies, one laid me off with a weeks notice. No more flying checks!
Started a EMS job this year and will take home six figures.

It took me five years to 'make it', and about 4000 hours in that time frame, which is significantly more work than most pilots achieve.

I paid for my training with savings from a previous career, with zero debt. I got my Private certificate on a whim, and realised I'd never be happy doing anything else.

If you are prepared to sacrifice everything for this career, move across the country, or to a foreign country like me, then you'll stand a chance. If you can be happy any other way, it's probably for the best.

I have a friend who went to an airline two years ago. His airline is bankrupt, he's still working, paying $700 of his $1800 a month pay to his loans, and the company has failed to make payroll five times in two years.

I send pizzas to the local flight school whenever I think back to my flight instruction days.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 12:29:17 PM EDT
[#37]
Quoted:
We have tons of commercial pilots here.    

I did exactly what you are proposing a couple decades ago.  Even then, it was expensive.  

I think you will find it is substantially more money and time than you think.

A couple thoughts:  Do NOT believe the claims of any flight schools.  They have an agenda.

Do NOT believe in the coming "Pilot Shortage!!!"     It's an industry joke.  A lie that's been told since the Wright brothers.

Finance it with rich parents, or a rich wife.    90% of successful pilots start out with one or the other, I shit you not.

The other 10% (the crazy bastards like me) occasionally succeed, but only by dedicating their entire life to it.

There are a bunch of good Pro pilot boards, one of my favorites is ProPilotWorld.com     Sign up and look at the Jobs board.  Ask questions.    

My intent isn't to talk you out of it, but you owe it to yourself to find out the truth of what it really entails.  

IM me if you have questions.


 



My story as well. Its been my life and love for 20 years.

The road to becoming a professional pilot is littered with the bodies of the 90 percent that fail. Keep that in mind.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 12:33:25 PM EDT
[#38]
Quoted:
I have been an instructor for 25 years both privately and I ran a large international flight scchool.  My advice...
If you are seriious about it, buy a Piper Archer or Arrow.  They can be found for incredibly low prices, are forgiving and easy to fly and insurance and maintenance  isn't too bad.  This is especially good if you can hook it up with a business you may,,,, own..  Hire a private instructor who has experience.  Ask around at the local airports.  You will find out quick who to hire.  Your investments and cost will be a monthly payment, fuel and the instructor. An annual inspection will run you maybe $2-3 thousand.  Budget y Get your private, instrument and if you can buy an arrow, commercial.  Then you can sell your plane, hopefully for a little profit to help cover some of the fuel you paid for and you won't come out too bad on cost.  Then just do a quick course offered through a school for multi-engine.  You will be hard pressed to find private multi stuff.  

As many have said, don't do this for a living!  You will be sorry.  I have flown for 4 airlines so far and 3 have gone out of business.  The glory of an airline job only lasts a few months.  If you really enjoy it, get your instructor ratings and do it on the side of your regular job.


Fuck that, get a c150 for 15k and fly the shit outa it. You pay 30k for a cherokee 140 which is the same thing for the most part, and gets you nohing more. Cheap enough and it will pay for itself.

Its what I did ;)

The key is zero debt! Or low debt. Bigh school loans force you to make money right away, which you won't do as a pilot.
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 12:37:33 PM EDT
[#39]
Pilot shortage is right around the corner........KD

Link Posted: 7/3/2012 12:50:00 PM EDT
[#40]
Link Posted: 7/3/2012 8:03:29 PM EDT
[#41]
The pilot that I specifically picked to train under is not building his hours and is already established and has a job as a pilot for a company. He is running the flight school as a side venture. I am a fan of experience and I don't want somebody almost as green as me teaching me. Blind leading the blind never went anywhere.
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