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Posted: 11/4/2015 10:24:15 AM EST

British Equipment 1982, a Typical Load carried by each individual Soldier / Marine, during the Conflict, The most famous yomp of recent times was during the 1982 Falklands War. After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying 80 pounds (36 kg) loads, then Engaging in Battle, in which all were decisive victories for the British
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:55:19 AM EST
I remember reading about a guy in 2 Para who loaded up twice the required war load for ammo and still ran out when they went at it at Wireless Ridge. Halfway through the battle he was digging through dead Argies gear for more ammo.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:56:35 AM EST
That is a lot of shit to haul around.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:00:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2015 11:00:54 AM EST by John-in-austin]
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/12191486_513536078806674_6954298340479492856_n.jpg?oh=5a3d9c510831df9fc2b5662658efb3f7&oe=56BC0729

British Equipment 1982, a Typical Load carried by each individual Soldier / Marine, during the Conflict, The most famous yomp of recent times was during the 1982 Falklands War. After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying 80 pounds (36 kg) loads, then Engaging in Battle, in which all were decisive victories for the British
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I really doubt each individual soldier carried a LAW, night vsion scope, radio and a camera.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:00:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/12191486_513536078806674_6954298340479492856_n.jpg?oh=5a3d9c510831df9fc2b5662658efb3f7&oe=56BC0729

British Equipment 1982, a Typical Load carried by each individual Soldier / Marine, during the Conflict, The most famous yomp of recent times was during the 1982 Falklands War. After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying 80 pounds (36 kg) loads, then Engaging in Battle, in which all were decisive victories for the British
View Quote


80 pounds my ass, there's 50 pounds of gear there just in rifle, optics, ammo and radio.

They had to be bumping 120 plus not including spare belts of MG ammo, antitank weapons and/or mortars.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:01:05 AM EST
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Originally Posted By John-in-austin:



I really doubt each individual soldier carried a LAW, night vsion scope, radio and a camera.
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Originally Posted By John-in-austin:
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/12191486_513536078806674_6954298340479492856_n.jpg?oh=5a3d9c510831df9fc2b5662658efb3f7&oe=56BC0729

British Equipment 1982, a Typical Load carried by each individual Soldier / Marine, during the Conflict, The most famous yomp of recent times was during the 1982 Falklands War. After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying 80 pounds (36 kg) loads, then Engaging in Battle, in which all were decisive victories for the British



I really doubt each individual soldier carried a LAW, night vsion scope, radio and a camera.
Falklands war
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:03:52 AM EST
If carrying around that shit was that bad, I highly doubt every joe would have a kodak in their pack.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:06:02 AM EST
Cool pic nevertheless.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:12:46 AM EST
Don't cry for me, sergeant-major by Robert McGowan and Jeremy Hands is a great read.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:17:57 AM EST
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:27:23 AM EST
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Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
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I approve of this message.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:45:16 AM EST
A cousin of mine was in 3 commando. He told me it was a hard slog.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:46:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
View Quote



That's money for the NAAFI Canteen or unit level bars that invariably get set up shortly after the Brits take up residence anywhere. Back then they were paid in cash no matter where they were in the world.

I miss the NAAFi, you got cheaper smokes, better snacks and porn there. Also if the brass wasn't around and you had a British friend with you, beer would get left out cold and already open as long as you donated to a charity back in the UK.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 9:14:55 PM EST
Interesting
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 9:40:16 PM EST
Where's the photo from? Got a link?
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 6:35:37 AM EST
I'm guessing a portion of that would be being worn not carried...
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 7:02:21 AM EST
cool pic.

Were they wearing armor back then? Even if just FLAKS?

I think my SAW, ammo, and armor weighed more then all that though
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:19:29 PM EST
That utensil set looks just like my German set........that does not look right.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:24:10 PM EST
Long live the L1A1 SLR!


I love mines and it is my forever rifle.

Thought about trading it for a SCAR.

got bitch slapped on the WHY.

Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:36:30 PM EST
Someone echelons above reality may have put together that packing list, but Joe ain't carrying all that stuff. At first glance a bunch of it gets left behind or split up.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:43:21 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:43:56 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:56:55 PM EST
Travel light, freeze at night.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 9:57:00 PM EST
Cute onezie
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:06:36 PM EST
Why the toothbrush?
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:10:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
View Quote


You're going to have to answer to the Coca Cola company.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:13:14 PM EST
No asswipe.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:16:09 PM EST
Cool picture.

Is it common to carry stripper clips and mags? I am sure it is a good way to carry more ammo with a little less weight.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:24:43 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Cavscouty:
Why the toothbrush?
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He might still have a tooth.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:26:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cavscouty:
Why the toothbrush?
View Quote

Gotta love that British sense of humor.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:30:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
View Quote


"One hundred dollars in gold, one hundred dollars in rubles, one pack of prophylactics, one pair of nylons... Shoot. A feller could have a pretty good time in Vegas with all this."

Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:30:55 PM EST
Well at least they packed duct tape. If you can't duk it, Fuck it.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:33:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Trebor:
Where's the photo from? Got a link?
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Here you go.

Pictures of what a British solder might have carried from medieval times to today.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:44:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TheRealBluedog:
Cute onezie
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Look closer: those are separate skivvies and wife beaters.

There's no way they carried all that shit. I can see a lot of stuff that wouldn't be packed.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 10:46:16 PM EST
They never heard of a spork?
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 11:00:21 PM EST
Makes the rifle look that much heavier...
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 11:09:25 PM EST
Woolly jumpa.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 11:19:32 PM EST
Photo is bullshit.

LAW - Not carried.
Kodak -Not carried.
NV Scope - not carried.
NBC Kit (gas mask etc) - Not carried
Radio - Not everyone carried

It's a good example of what might be ISSUED but not what was carried.

The heaviest load carriers of non mounted infantry were the Anti-Tank platoon, 120lbs if equipment plus 80lb of MILAN pieces, which together with your 2 mates allowed a three person team.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 11:28:14 PM EST
Yeah, I can tell you right now a lot of that shit would have gotten chucked after the layout if it was me
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 9:55:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/12191486_513536078806674_6954298340479492856_n.jpg?oh=5a3d9c510831df9fc2b5662658efb3f7&oe=56BC0729

British Equipment 1982, a Typical Load carried by each individual Soldier / Marine, during the Conflict, The most famous yomp of recent times was during the 1982 Falklands War.
After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying 80 pounds (36 kg) loads, then Engaging in Battle, in which all were decisive victories for the British

View Quote

Thank goodness women will be joining men in combat as women have proven they can do just as well as a man.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 9:57:46 AM EST
L1A1
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 9:58:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/6/2015 9:59:58 AM EST by TNC]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?
View Quote


You are gonna have to answer to the Coca-Cola corporation!


Tommy needs more socks.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 9:59:30 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By m289271:


You're going to have to answer to the Coca Cola company.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By m289271:
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
What's with the money?

You don't think I go into combat with loose change in my pockets, do you?


You're going to have to answer to the Coca Cola company.


Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:01:44 AM EST
Is that a leotard that his watch is sitting on?
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:11:10 AM EST
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Originally Posted By TNC:
Is that a leotard that his watch is sitting on?
View Quote

I saw that too. Closer look reveals that it's underwear on top of a-shirts or muscle shirts.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:19:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/6/2015 10:24:29 AM EST by Sinister]
For the Falklands, camera would be personal choice and Starlight equivalent probably not (they were is short supply). NBC kit (mask and chem suit) doubtful in Northern Ireland and Falklands (although for exercises anywhere in Europe, sure). Squad radio would depend on your position as a Squad or Fire Team Leader.

Substitute those items for another 200-round belt of 7.62 or a single 81mm HE mortar bomb, battery for the squad or platoon radio, more chow, and water for the Falklands. The waterproof bag under the ruck would hold a sleeping bag and "Basha" (waterproof tarp).

I also don't see his "Dome of Obedience" (helmet) and individual soldier webbing.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:20:33 AM EST
Great pic. Love the kit.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:22:49 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mmsSierra:
Cool picture.

Is it common to carry stripper clips and mags? I am sure it is a good way to carry more ammo with a little less weight.
View Quote


The mags were carried loaded. The mags were reloaded from the stripper clips. The little do-dad next to the magazine in the rifle is the stripper clip guide.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:31:29 AM EST
A few months ago I looked up the gear that Carlos Hathcock took out into the field for extended periods of time alone or with one spotter. Hathcock carried: Web belt, bolt action rifle with scope, poncho rolled up as tight as possible on the belt in a pouch in the small of his back, two canteens, Colt 1911 with two full magazines, 65 rounds of ammo for the bolt action, water purification tablets, maps, ka-bar knife, a first-aid kit, zippo lighter, and the only luxury toilet paper. He carried no pack. Particularly interesting to me was that he stuffed all his pockets with food. His spotter carried the same gear but with a M14 instead of the bolt action and the radio. I believe this information is accurate because Hathcock told this to Roy Chandler for the book Whitefeather. Also look at the confederate infantry under Stonewall Jackson who were known for how fast they could cover long distances on foot. Pretty early in the war they discovered packs were an annoyance and reduced their load to what could be rolled in their blanket with the ends tied up with string. It is stupid to fatigue early due to gear you will never use.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:47:31 AM EST
I am in no way trying to take away from the epic badassedness of the march across the Falklands, but every account I have read of the war the troops traveled light and had their "Bergens" as they called them helicoptered in to them each night or were loaded into skids and pulled behind the column with a kelper's tractor.

When the British landed at San Carlos each man was given 2 mortar bombs to bring ashore and deposit on the beach after they got on dry land.

During the battles each man also was issued a 200 round belt of 7.62 link that was left with the machine gun teams as they advanced up the mountains into battle.
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 10:58:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/6/2015 11:00:07 AM EST by LRRPF52]


That looks more like a unit-level layout inspection or something someone collected.

You now see why the battle rifle is a terrible idea when you look at the mags, even if you double the basic load.

7 x 20rd 7.62 NATO mags = 140rds

140rds is not enough to get through a firefight gone bad where the enemy initiates, then continue mission with anticipated actions on the objective if you are the base of fire element (usually the lead element as 85% of all contacts are frontal).

Also, some of the most important kit, the PCLE is barely out of frame to the left under the Bergen.
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