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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/22/2005 5:18:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 5:21:12 PM EDT by CS223]
www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050921/LOCAL/209210324&SearchID=73221176418563

Article published Sep 21, 2005
Could sponges be the solution to the hurricanes that soak us?

Could the world's most powerful sponge suck up enough water from a hurricane to mop it into submission?

Peter Cordani thinks so. Now, all he needs is $50 million or so, a world-class scientific team, and the perfect storm to prove his case.

Cordani - an entrepreneur on Florida's east coast who has made a killing finding ways to use a new-age polymer to absorb water in gasoline tanks and hydraulic systems - thinks he could use a modified version of the stuff to tame a 'cane.

"The hurricane project, that is my thing right now," says the founder and chief executive of Jupiter-based Dyn-O-Mat Inc.

With a pile of polymer powder no bigger than a pencil eraser, Cordani says he can soak up a bowl of water in a second. For the past five years, he has been working to perfect a system for soaking up enough of a hurricane to stop it in its tracks, or to at least slow it down.

He has lined up credentialed scientists willing to consider his plan and even a jet fleet owner willing to drop the chemical on an unsuspecting storm.

The basic idea is to use as many as 10 modified Boeing 747s to drop gigantic quantities of his stuff into a carefully selected pie-shaped wedge of a rotating hurricane.

The powder will make raindrops far larger than normal streak toward the Earth's surface at far faster speeds, rapidly cutting a wedge out of the storm. The theory goes that the sudden change would cause a hurricane's wind field to start fighting itself, converting the spinning cyclone into a tamer storm, or, at the very least, slowing its circulation.

"We still need the rain, I understand that," Cordani says. "I'm just trying to take the punch out of a devastating disaster."

Promoting an idea
Fed up with a lack of response from the U.S. government, Cordani is seeking money either from private groups or another nation. He says he is getting serious consideration from Taiwan and Japan.

"Right now I am making a proposal - what it could cost to do a test, fly over with a team, since we can't get it done here."

Cordani has cleaned up with clever but more pedestrian uses for his polymer, which he began exploiting eight years ago. The nonorganic, biodegradable material already is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for agricultural use. Spread around the base, it absorbs and holds water around a plant's roots, delivering the water gradually instead of losing it to soil or evaporation.

The entrepreneur ground up off-the-shelf examples of the plastic and found he could dramatically increase its absorption rate. After developing methods for removing water from gas tanks and hydraulic systems, Cordani came up with a garage floor mat that absorbs oil drips from cars.

"We make it green for Christmas trees, tan for flower pots, and medical for ambulances. It is a non-leak backing, nothing will leak through it."

After becoming successful and passing the 40-year mark, Cordani evidently decided to leave a more significant legacy to humanity and began his hurricane-taming quest.

At first, he turned to National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, the federal weather tracking agency, for advice.

His main contact, Dr. Hugh Willoughby, encouraged Cordani, even advising him to change the shape of the polymer particles from BB-like pellets into cornflake shapes. That allows them to flutter down through a storm more slowly, giving them more time to attract water and much more absorptive surface.

Years later, Willoughby is derisive about the product, downplaying his involvement with Cordani.

"They sent me a jar of the stuff, and I played around with it some. We threw the stuff into the spray from a hose and it made little slimy drops."

Since NOAA and Dyn-O-Mat parted company, Cordani has received a usage patent from the U.S. Patent office.

In July 2001, Dyn-O-Mat became the first organization ever to remove a storm cloud from Doppler radar by dropping its powder into the storm from an airplane.

Thinking bigger
Now Cordani wants to go big-time.
He has found a willing team leader in Peter Ray, a Florida State University professor who is an acknowledged leader in storm research.

"I think it has possibilities," Ray says. "It has to be absolutely thoroughly and rigorously analyzed for it to stand any chance of application in the real world."

As the Gulf Coast reels from Hurricane Katrina and a fresh storm spins in, there might be new receptivity to such mind-boggling approaches to storm control.

"There is a movement afoot to rekindle weather modification generally," said Willoughby, now a senior scientist at Florida International University's International Hurricane Research Center.

While first referring to Cordani's product as "Dyno-slime," Willoughby changes gears to a more professional stance.

"Let's be diplomatic," Willoughby says. "I think they have a long way to go before they convince the scientific community of the validity."

Willoughby himself, while working at NOAA, wrote the post-mortem on a two-decade-long experiment to seed hurricanes with silver iodide crystals to cool them down enough to slow their progress. The efforts, which seeded four hurricanes a total of eight times, were largely ineffective.

"People have been doing weather modification for half a century," Willoughby says. "They've spent hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe billions -- no results that could be replicated."

For a while, NASA was paying for scientist Ross Hoffman to develop computer techniques to determine the best possible change that could be made to the atmosphere to try to change a hurricane, either by diminishing its intensity or its track. Among the proposals he fielded was to create a giant oil slick that would deprive the growing storm of direct contact with its growth medium: the sea's warm waters.

Looking ahead
Hoffman penned a 2004 cover story in Scientific American on weather modification, and is now a principal at Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc., a Lexington, Mass.-based weather consulting firm.

"Our technique is quite general. It could be applied to Dyn-O-Mat's material," Hoffman says.

While there are programs to boost rainfall in Texas and to reduce hail in North Dakota and in Alberta, Canada, Hoffman is not aware of projects to modify hurricanes.

Like Hoffman, Ray says one of the biggest challenges to testing any method is that you can't build a control experiment. "If you had seeded Ophelia and it didn't make landfall, was that because you seeded it, or because it just didn't make landfall?" Ray asks.

Willoughby chimes in with broader political concerns.

"You've got a hurricane heading for Havana and we decide to do Castro a favor by seeding it. The hurricane is a Category 2. If we had not seeded it, it would hit Havana as a 4.

"We seed it and it hits Havana as a 3. How would you convince somebody as upset as Fidel is going to be that it would have been a Category 4? That is the problem. How are you going to convince anybody that what you did helped them?"

Despite the pitfalls, Ray says vast improvements in the technologies now available - computer modeling to mobile radar systems - make it possible to get around the lack of a control experiment and to study the prospects for altering a storm very thoroughly for the first time in history.

He envisions a two- to four-year experiment with the Dyn-O-Mat material, culminating in a drop on a real hurricane.

First, he would replicate Cordani's original experiments with clouds to develop exact data on how the stuff interacts with rain, using the latest equipment. Then he would plug that fresh data into the world's best hurricane simulating computer models to see what the hypothetical effect would be.

Because hurricane damage to structures rises exponentially with wind speed, lowering it in any way could have dramatic results, Ray says.

"I'm not saying it would work. I'm saying it has the prospect of working."

ETA the link to his company.

www.dynomat.com/
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:21:51 PM EDT
Along the same lines of thinking...

If these ultra powerfull hurricanes are caused by warm water in the gulf,why not make the gulf colder ? For example drop some sort of 20 ton liquid nitrogen bomb into the eye of the hurricane while it is 100's of miles off the coast.

I am not a scientist (Big surprise LOL) but this seems like a viable solution.Freeze the water and take away the warmth that feeds the fucking thing therefore turning it into a tropical storm..
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:25:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gregory_A:
Along the same lines of thinking...

If these ultra powerfull hurricanes are caused by warm water in the gulf,why not make the gulf colder ? For example drop some sort of 20 ton liquid nitrogen bomb into the eye of the hurricane while it is 100's of miles off the coast.

I am not a scientist (Big surprise LOL) but this seems like a viable solution.Freeze the water and take away the warmth that feeds the fucking thing therefore turning it into a tropical storm..

20 Tons? Check your thermodynamic math...
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:31:27 PM EDT
I'm no scientist but modifying hurricanes or eliminating them brings two words to mind ; UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES.

It seems like one of those things that sounds like a good idea till you kill a hurricane, it causes a huge drought cause the land doesn't get as much water, the entire great plains loses a year of crops and a worldwide food shortage follows.

yeah I don't know if that would happen but I generally think that messing with systems this big is a baaaad idea..
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:33:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:
I'm no scientist but modifying hurricanes or eliminating them brings two words to mind ; UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES.

It seems like one of those things that sounds like a good idea till you kill a hurricane, it causes a huge drought cause the land doesn't get as much water, the entire great plains loses a year of crops and a worldwide food shortage follows.

yeah I don't know if that would happen but I generally think that messing with systems this big is a baaaad idea..



I don't think the idea is to eliminate them, but to reduce the intensity.
I can't see a down side to lowering the wind speed and size of the storm surge.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:36:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CS223:
www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050921/LOCAL/209210324&SearchID=73221176418563

Peter Cordani thinks so. Now, all he needs is $50 million or so, a world-class scientific team, and the perfect storm to prove his case.


www.dynomat.com/




hinking.gif
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:37:11 PM EDT
Too bad it isnt feasible to tow a huge iceberg into the gulf to cool that water down some..........
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:38:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:
I'm no scientist but modifying hurricanes or eliminating them brings two words to mind ; UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES.

It seems like one of those things that sounds like a good idea till you kill a hurricane, it causes a huge drought cause the land doesn't get as much water, the entire great plains loses a year of crops and a worldwide food shortage follows.

yeah I don't know if that would happen but I generally think that messing with systems this big is a baaaad idea..



I don't think the idea is to eliminate them, but to reduce the intensity.
I can't see a down side to lowering the wind speed and size of the storm surge.



Ya but with all our technology, weather is one of the least understood phenomenons on this planet. We dont really understand how it all happens or what it affects. You never know what all these hurricanes affect in the long run.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:42:40 PM EDT
What an idiot.

Now if we got a bunch of Kool Aid and dropped tons of THAT into a hurricane we'd have a wonderful, strawberry treat that kids love.

And ya know black folks love Kool Aid. Hell you probably wouldn't need Red Cross cards anymore. They could just send their children outside for a fast and tasty treat.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:42:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dace:
Ya but with all our technology, weather is one of the least understood phenomenons on this planet. We dont really understand how it all happens or what it affects. You never know what all these hurricanes affect in the long run.




True, but I know the difference in the effect of a cat 2 and a cat 5 on the coastal communities. I bet you do too.

Storms that never make hurricane strength dump tons of rain on the US every year.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:43:57 PM EDT
We need to send a dozen or so barges out into the gulf with the decks completely covered with windows unit air conditioners! Yeah!

And send the National Guard to confiscate ice from every convenience store along the Gulf Coast to throw in the water. Yeah!

Either that, or just get George Bush & Dick Cheney to turn off the Halliburton storm machine. At least find the power cord and unplug the damn thing!
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:45:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
What an idiot.

Now if we got a bunch of Kool Aid and dropped tons of THAT into a hurricane we'd have a wonderful, strawberry treat that kids love.

And ya know black folks love Kool Aid. Hell you probably wouldn't need Red Cross cards anymore. They could just send their children outside for a fast and tasty treat.




That's just dumb. A hurricane is powered by heat. Who wants to drink warm Kool Aid?

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:47:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BlammO:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
What an idiot.

Now if we got a bunch of Kool Aid and dropped tons of THAT into a hurricane we'd have a wonderful, strawberry treat that kids love.

And ya know black folks love Kool Aid. Hell you probably wouldn't need Red Cross cards anymore. They could just send their children outside for a fast and tasty treat.




That's just dumb. A hurricane is powered by heat. Who wants to drink warm Kool Aid?




People who are "so poor and so black."
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:50:50 PM EDT
Don't worry world! I'll save you!!




Where's my $50,000,000?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:52:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stealth:
Don't worry world! I'll save you!!

img.photobucket.com/albums/v480/RealUgly/Spongebob.gif


Where's my $50,000,000?





That's some funny shit.....
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:59:17 PM EDT
Can I request some Tequila in the Strawberry, Ice mixer blend thing going on

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:00:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DagNasty:

Originally Posted By CS223:
www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050921/LOCAL/209210324&SearchID=73221176418563

Peter Cordani thinks so. Now, all he needs is $50 million or so, a world-class scientific team, and the perfect storm to prove his case.


www.dynomat.com/



Chump change compared to what insurnace companies shell out and the 200 Billon they paln to spend on New Oreleans alone. I'm really surprised the insurance companies don't put up the capital to give this a shot. If they waited till the storm was near land they'd have the benefit of shallow water slowing the storm, loss of the heat energy fueling the storm, and the rain would still benefit the land. If you could reduce it from a hurricane to a tropical storm, the cost savings on insurance claims along would pay for it. Providing that it works.



Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:01:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 6:09:28 PM EDT by CS223]
.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:10:18 PM EDT
Every body thinks that guy was looting but he was trying to offer the storm a cold one to knock it down. See what happens when you try to do something good for mankind. You just end up being made fun of on the internet.
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