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Posted: 12/25/2015 3:42:30 AM EDT
are these legal to use now and have they replaced the wire nut?

thanks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qoIOVA57YU
Link Posted: 12/25/2015 5:01:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/25/2015 5:06:44 AM EDT by OverScoped]


Originally Posted By Wash-Ar15:



are these legal to use now and have they replaced the wire nut?





thanks





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qoIOVA57YU
View Quote


View Quote

He didn't tape it either. I noticed there was about a 1/16 of bare wire outside of his connection.





I would pass.





 

Link Posted: 12/25/2015 5:18:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Wash-Ar15:
are these legal to use now and have they replaced the wire nut?

thanks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qoIOVA57YU
View Quote

They're junk. I wouldn't use them on anything but low load applications. I've replaced way too many devices because of failed spring-tight connections.
Link Posted: 12/25/2015 5:43:31 AM EDT
That guy is a clown

He's got those wires stripped like he's gonna twist them together and then snip them to length for a wire nut.  But no.

Inspectors around here would never pass not stripping the romex to the back of the box.

So, for him, these connectors are probably great since I doubt he can properly work a wire nut.
Link Posted: 12/25/2015 5:44:39 AM EDT
Yes they are legal but like said above I would avoid using.
Link Posted: 12/25/2015 12:22:04 PM EDT


Because backstabbing works so well on receptacles, why not add more?
Link Posted: 12/25/2015 2:50:26 PM EDT
When it comes time for maintenance, how do you get them off?  Do they have a release?

Do they have a built-in stripping guide?  I would not want/allow exposed metal outside the connector.

Link Posted: 12/26/2015 12:47:36 AM EDT
Yes, they are legal, no, they have not replaced wire nuts.  I've seen them from the factory in lighting fixtures, connecting ballasts/drivers.  They haven't been in common use for too terribly long, so it's mostly speculation how they will hold up over time.  Personally, I would stick with the tried and true, but I've seen them used for old work where the wires were trimmed too short to get a wire nut on.

I didn't see any way to release them, but the ones I ran into weren't made by ideal. They're UL listed and made by a reputable manufacturer, so they probably won't cause your house to burn down.  For someone who doesn't use wire nuts with any frequency, they might even be better since they seem pretty foolproof... expect maybe for the guy on the video.
Link Posted: 12/26/2015 3:20:33 AM EDT
They work fine. You can remove them by wiggling/twisting them while gently pulling. They are more common in other parts of the world.

That being said, they only work on solid core wire (not stranded) and they do not hold nearly as well as wire nuts with tape.
Link Posted: 12/27/2015 2:29:57 AM EDT
A lot of things are legal that probably shouldn't be.
Link Posted: 12/27/2015 11:49:25 AM EDT
They are UL listed. I use them some. They are great for connecting wire some idiot cut too short. I try to use them in low current settings, I wouldn't use them to connect a motor or a heater. Anything with a large heat cycle.
They are often compared to the old backstabbed outlets, but the design is different. The old backstabbed devices used the fingertip of a spring wire to make the connection. If you look at these new connectors, they lay on a piece of metal, providing a much larger surface area for the connection to be made. That helps keep them cooler. Heat is the enemy.

Don't use previously twisted wire in them, it needs to be smooth and flat.

I had one inspector claim he wouldn't accept them. I pointed out that most new can lights come with them preinstalled. If he wasn't going to accept mine, then he would have to go back and require the thousands and thousands installed already in his jurisdiction to be removed. He relented. I still haven't heard of any house fires from the new style.

Times change. I also use Arlington black buttons 99% of the time I need a romex clamp. When I first started using them, everyone else was still using two screw clamps. Now I see them all the time in others work. Speed is important.
Link Posted: 12/27/2015 12:11:21 PM EDT
Just like everything else.. They have their place, DIY types & residential electricians will probably miss use them

But they are perfectly fine for many situations
Link Posted: 12/29/2015 8:48:05 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By slanted:
That guy is a clown

He's got those wires stripped like he's gonna twist them together and then snip them to length for a wire nut.  But no.

Inspectors around here would never pass not stripping the romex to the back of the box.

So, for him, these connectors are probably great since I doubt he can properly work a wire nut.
View Quote



I know it's code but why is it code?  In other words, why is it important?  Thanks,
Link Posted: 12/29/2015 9:24:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ILoveGauge:


Because backstabbing works so well on receptacles, why not add more?
View Quote


Thats what I was thinking.   I had to redo all of the back stabbed outlets in my house.   Every time I would plug something in,  the outlet would blow and trip the breaker.

What's so hard about wire nuts?
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 1:41:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:



I know it's code but why is it code?  In other words, why is it important?  Thanks,
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By slanted:
That guy is a clown

He's got those wires stripped like he's gonna twist them together and then snip them to length for a wire nut.  But no.

Inspectors around here would never pass not stripping the romex to the back of the box.

So, for him, these connectors are probably great since I doubt he can properly work a wire nut.



I know it's code but why is it code?  In other words, why is it important?  Thanks,


It is NOT code.
The only thing that IS code is that 1/4 inch of the jacket must show inside the box.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 3:40:19 PM EDT
sure they are.

I used a bunch in my garage and shop for multiswitch boxes.

SIngle feed in, multiple switches and lines out installed at different times... one 8 or a couple 4 slot ones is a godsend vs un nutting and repeadly renutting a big ball of pigtails.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 9:12:29 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ILoveGauge:


Because backstabbing works so well on receptacles, why not add more?
View Quote



You should note that back stabs are only allowed on #14 and 15 amp circuits.
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