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Posted: 10/30/2004 12:30:11 PM EST
A-40 to emerge again?
27 Oct 2004

Developed in early 1980s the Beriev A-40 project was frozen in 1990. In 1995 the Tu-204P won a tender to provide for a new patrol aircraft. Almost ten years later, not a single Tu-204 is delivered. This is way the Defence Ministry is now looking at the A-40 again and the program may be revitalised again.

The A-40 was a product of the merge of the A-42 search-and-rescue (SAR) amphibian and the A-44 patrol aircraft. Two prototypes ware made that are still in flying condition today. A third prototype (A-42 SAR configuration) was build, and discontinued at 80% in 1993. If the Defence Ministry is able to allocate funds the unfinished A-42 may become the prototype of the supposed multi-role patrol aircraft.

http://aviamagazine.xs4all.nl/news/readnews.asp?id=69



Link Posted: 10/30/2004 12:40:40 PM EST
Yikes, jet engine + salt water = icky.

Why do Russian birds always look like they're stuck in the 50's?
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 12:50:31 PM EST
That things fugly
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 12:52:00 PM EST
I was about to say "isn't that the big thing that skims the water?"...


Ummm... what happens if there is a wave?


- BG
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 12:55:49 PM EST
That is just ODD.You would think that they would at least copy our LCAC.
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 1:07:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/30/2004 1:10:05 PM EST by GunSlingAR]

Originally Posted By coondog:
That is just ODD.You would think that they would at least copy our LCAC.



Ummmm, the LCAC can't FLY.
That can.

ETA: I think it looks kinda cool, I kinda miss the idea of float-planes.
www.aeronautics.ru/archive/vvs/a40-01.htm
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 1:11:00 PM EST
they had a bigger version that oculd carry 1000 marines several 1000 miles at several hundred miles an hour... little better than a lcac
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 1:12:06 PM EST
The water skimmer is a different beast.

It's know as "The Caspian Sea Monster".
www.samolet.co.uk/km.html







Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
I was about to say "isn't that the big thing that skims the water?"...


Ummm... what happens if there is a wave?


- BG

Link Posted: 10/30/2004 2:47:13 PM EST
I think the call it an ekranoplane. Flies on a cushion of compressed air. Shouldn't get higher than 50 feet off of the water. Very efficient within its operating envelope from the article I read about it.
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 2:48:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By Jeepster:
I think the call it an ekranoplane. Flies on a cushion of compressed air. Shouldn't get higher than 50 feet off of the water. Very efficient within its operating envelope from the article I read about it.



Ground effect is a wonderful thing.
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 2:49:13 PM EST
Unless you are trying to land.....


Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:
Ground effect is a wonderful thing.

Link Posted: 10/30/2004 2:51:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Unless you are trying to land.....


Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:
Ground effect is a wonderful thing.






Always with the good comebacks.
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 3:05:12 PM EST
When I was working Intel back in my USAF days we called this:

http://www.samolet.co.uk/lun.html

The "Caspian Sea Monster".

Sort of a variant the same craft, but armed. Seriously armed. Say what you will about Russian cold war stuff, this thing struck us all as BadAss. Nothing to be afraid of, but we loved watching it in action.

-Gator
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 3:07:15 PM EST
[sea story] One time my crew had a mission to recover an atomic powered weather station from Antarctica on the Polar Plateau (AGO Station 3).

Ground level is about 9,000 feet out there.

We got out there late after the snow had warmed up, so when we went to leave the pilot (LC-130F) had problems getting the main skis unstuck from the snow.
After 4 tries the pilot asked for crew consent to go ahead and keep on the takeoff run until we got airborne.

We agreed since we didn't want to spend a few hours waiting for the snow to firm up.

After the pilot did about a 6000 foot takeoff roll he was finally able to get the nose unstuck from the snow. We went from about 70 knots to about 80 knots, but the main skis would not get unstuck.
The pilot tried bouncing the nose gear off the snow a couple of times and came close to getting off the ground. Finally the main skis unstuck at about 85 knots and the Herc jumped off the deck.
He had to fly the Herc in ground effect for probably 3 miles before he got up enough airspeed to start bleeding the flaps up, and another couple of miles until he had enough airspeed to get the gear up.

All in a days work. [/sea story]




Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Unless you are trying to land.....


Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:
Ground effect is a wonderful thing.






Always with the good comebacks.

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