Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 11/3/2009 6:35:17 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:36:25 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:37:45 AM EST
Damn...

That'd suck
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:38:09 AM EST
That shelving looks a bit wobbly.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:39:18 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:39:42 AM EST
I aint clean'en that up
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:40:11 AM EST
shitt'll buff right out dude
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:40:48 AM EST
My last day at homedepot

Watch this guy scramble
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:42:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By kjensen_co:
That shelving looks a bit wobbly.


yeah looks like they skimped on the shelving.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:44:09 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:48:30 AM EST
Wow!
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:50:19 AM EST
DAM........
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:51:19 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 6:58:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 6:59:18 AM EST by Rob762]
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:10:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rob762:
Reminds me of
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqd4aPs5WTA


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:14:29 AM EST
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:19:15 AM EST
In Soviet Russia, forklift drives you.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:21:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By bjwar10:





Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:22:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:22:20 AM EST
holy shit!
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:33:21 AM EST
Wow

I am quite surprised how fragile that shelving really is.

I do not think that it would have stayed up even if there was nothing on it.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:35:23 AM EST
Clean up on isle 4.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:35:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.


No. If you ram an 8,000 lb object into a 2"x3" (hollow) steel shelving system at pretty much any speed, even bolted to the floor (like at the warehouse I work at), that shelf is toast. Our pallets average 2500 lbs, stacked 3 high. Knock the support system out from under 7500 lbs, and its going to come down.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:37:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By jacobsk:
Originally Posted By Rob762:
Reminds me of
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqd4aPs5WTA



Awesome, especialy when the razor stuck in the one guys head
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:38:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:39:13 AM EST
will not buff out
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:42:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 7:47:27 AM EST by AR4U]
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.


No. If you ram an 8,000 lb object into a 2"x3" (hollow) steel shelving system at pretty much any speed, even bolted to the floor (like at the warehouse I work at), that shelf is toast. Our pallets average 2500 lbs, stacked 3 high. Knock the support system out from under 7500 lbs, and its going to come down.


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:44:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By jacobsk:
Originally Posted By Rob762:
Reminds me of
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqd4aPs5WTA






Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:47:28 AM EST
Seems to be a problem with the shelving really more than anything. I work in a warehouse and I think everybody there has bumped into a shelf with the fork lift at some point. Maybe not with that much force, but damn....
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:49:02 AM EST
I like how the other driver hauled ass (relatively speaking) out of there.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:50:59 AM EST
Wow!
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:51:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.


No. If you ram an 8,000 lb object into a 2"x3" (hollow) steel shelving system at pretty much any speed, even bolted to the floor (like at the warehouse I work at), that shelf is toast. Our pallets average 2500 lbs, stacked 3 high. Knock the support system out from under 7500 lbs, and its going to come down.


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gas pumps, LNG tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.


8000 lbs going into a steel upright at 10mph isn't a minor perturbation. That's going to be close to 13 tons of force against the upright supports. Shelving systems get bumped all the time, and do fine. Ours are all scratched up at the bases from hitting them with the tail, or forks, or pallets. Shelving systems were never designed to take high force impacts. Comparing that with the concrete barriers around gas pumps (who's SOLE purpose is to protect the pump) is a poor comparison.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:54:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By AR4U:


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.

You cant make everything 100% safe 100% of the time.

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:55:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 7:57:08 AM EST by JonnyVain]
Originally Posted By kjensen_co:
That shelving looks a bit wobbly.


Where my dad works, people would bump the shelves and dent them. One day someone set a palette of water on top, and the whole thing came down.

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
$5 says no injuries if they both stay in the forklift.


it looks like the other guy pulled out before it rained on him.

In the story above, if the guy stayed in the lift, he might be dead. He bailed.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:57:24 AM EST
Damn............thought it was going to be this one..

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:58:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:00:35 AM EST

And I thought I saw some shit when a dude at my old job sliced open a gaylord of plastic compound pellets right at the bottom and let near 2 tons of the crap onto the shop floor with a tow motor.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:07:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 8:08:54 AM EST by XterraJohn]
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.


No. If you ram an 8,000 lb object into a 2"x3" (hollow) steel shelving system at pretty much any speed, even bolted to the floor (like at the warehouse I work at), that shelf is toast. Our pallets average 2500 lbs, stacked 3 high. Knock the support system out from under 7500 lbs, and its going to come down.


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gas pumps, LNG tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.


8000 lbs going into a steel upright at 10mph isn't a minor perturbation. That's going to be close to 13 tons of force against the upright supports. Shelving systems get bumped all the time, and do fine. Ours are all scratched up at the bases from hitting them with the tail, or forks, or pallets. Shelving systems were never designed to take high force impacts. Comparing that with the concrete barriers around gas pumps (who's SOLE purpose is to protect the pump) is a poor comparison.


I think that his point was that, if the shelving system is that weak, then it should have a concrete barrier in front of it, "(who's SOLE purpose is to protect the pump shelf)."
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:07:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.

You cant make everything 100% safe 100% of the time.



No, but it's foolish not to take reasonable precautions. It's reasonable to expect that forklifts will occasionally bump the shelving supports; there is a high probability that an accident can occur. The results of several tons of products collapsing on workers can be expensive both in terms of lost material, lost time and in terms of potential injury to the workers.

Who wouldn't take reasonable precautions against an accident that is likely to occur and has a high cost in both economic and human terms?
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:13:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By RckClimber:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By XDTX:
I'd say the driver has a lawsuit against the company. Accicdents happen and those shelving units were improperley, if at all, secured.


+1

While the driver made a mistake, whoever designed or overloaded the storage is the real dumbass.


No. If you ram an 8,000 lb object into a 2"x3" (hollow) steel shelving system at pretty much any speed, even bolted to the floor (like at the warehouse I work at), that shelf is toast. Our pallets average 2500 lbs, stacked 3 high. Knock the support system out from under 7500 lbs, and its going to come down.


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gas pumps, LNG tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.


8000 lbs going into a steel upright at 10mph isn't a minor perturbation. That's going to be close to 13 tons of force against the upright supports. Shelving systems get bumped all the time, and do fine. Ours are all scratched up at the bases from hitting them with the tail, or forks, or pallets. Shelving systems were never designed to take high force impacts. Comparing that with the concrete barriers around gas pumps (who's SOLE purpose is to protect the pump) is a poor comparison.


Gas pumps aren't designed to sustain high forces either, which is WHY they have physical barriers. Thanks for making my point.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:17:13 AM EST
Cheap shelving + domino effect = BAD
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:22:21 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:24:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.

You cant make everything 100% safe 100% of the time.



No, but it's foolish not to take reasonable precautions. It's reasonable to expect that forklifts will occasionally bump the shelving supports; there is a high probability that an accident can occur. The results of several tons of products collapsing on workers can be expensive both in terms of lost material, lost time and in terms of potential injury to the workers.

Who wouldn't take reasonable precautions against an accident that is likely to occur and has a high cost in both economic and human terms?

how much are YOU as a consumer willing to pay for this mythical 'safety'?

There are dozens and dozens of ways some idiot on a forklift can domino shelving, to protect against them you will have to drastically increase the cost to build, operate, and maintain warehouses. Costs that will filter down the food chain to the consumers.

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:31:06 AM EST
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.

You cant make everything 100% safe 100% of the time.



No, but it's foolish not to take reasonable precautions. It's reasonable to expect that forklifts will occasionally bump the shelving supports; there is a high probability that an accident can occur. The results of several tons of products collapsing on workers can be expensive both in terms of lost material, lost time and in terms of potential injury to the workers.

Who wouldn't take reasonable precautions against an accident that is likely to occur and has a high cost in both economic and human terms?

how much are YOU as a consumer willing to pay for this mythical 'safety'?

There are dozens and dozens of ways some idiot on a forklift can domino shelving, to protect against them you will have to drastically increase the cost to build, operate, and maintain warehouses. Costs that will filter down the food chain to the consumers.



Both the cost of accidents and the cost of accident-prevention measures are passed on to the consumer. Which do you think costs more, some concrete-filled pipes in the slab in front of the shelving, or two complete shelving systems worth of goods crushing two lifts and perhaps two lift operators? How much would the lawsuits be if the lift operators were killed or maimed? And that's just one accident...
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:31:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Silence:

Originally Posted By AR4U:


"Engineering safeties"

If you can't design a shelving system that won't crumple like that with a minor perturbation, then you put a steel (or other suitable material) barrier to keep the forklifts from getting to the shelving supports. Ever notice how gasoline pumps, LP tanks and NG meters are protected by cages or bollards? That's because they aren't designed by retards.

You cant make everything 100% safe 100% of the time.



No, but it's foolish not to take reasonable precautions. It's reasonable to expect that forklifts will occasionally bump the shelving supports; there is a high probability that an accident can occur. The results of several tons of products collapsing on workers can be expensive both in terms of lost material, lost time and in terms of potential injury to the workers.

Who wouldn't take reasonable precautions against an accident that is likely to occur and has a high cost in both economic and human terms?

how much are YOU as a consumer willing to pay for this mythical 'safety'?

There are dozens and dozens of ways some idiot on a forklift can domino shelving, to protect against them you will have to drastically increase the cost to build, operate, and maintain warehouses. Costs that will filter down the food chain to the consumers.



I know, I have seen experienced operators take a brand new forklift and put it on it's side within 30 minutes of starting it.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:35:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 8:37:03 AM EST by Silence]

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Both the cost of accidents and the cost of accident-prevention measures are passed on to the consumer. Which do you think costs more, some concrete-filled pipes in the slab in front of the shelving, or two complete shelving systems worth of goods crushing two lifts and perhaps two lift operators? How much would the lawsuits be if the lift operators were killed or maimed? And that's just one accident...

Do you know how much it would cost to bollard an entire warehouse?

And how much changing configuration of such a warehouse would cost if you had to do that?

Paying the occasional idiot a few bucks and replacing the damaged goods every few years is WAY cheaper.

If it wasnt every warehouse would already have bollards...

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:38:02 AM EST
"Your shipment has experienced an exception and should arrive soon, thank you"
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:04:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:12:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By psyops4fun:
Originally Posted By jacobsk:
Originally Posted By Rob762:
Reminds me of
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqd4aPs5WTA








Ah, those wacky germans, always good for a laugh.
All I need now is some scat porn and a brat and the day will be complete.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:16:03 AM EST

Originally Posted By Harvster:
"Your shipment has experienced an exception and should arrive soon, thank you"

HAHAHA! Oh man. Coffee on screen.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:52:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By Harvster:
"Your shipment has experienced an exception and should arrive soon, thank you"


"Your shipment destroyed in transit. Claim Invited."
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top