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Posted: 3/28/2009 8:21:23 AM EST
Or whatever you call it Since my lens broke, I'm having to learn about manual focus.


Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:22:08 AM EST
Cool, I love the black and white.

2nd pick kicks ass.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:23:54 AM EST
Second pic is awesome.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:28:05 AM EST
I love the effects.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:29:13 AM EST
I love that AK. And I love black and white - that's always been my photographic background
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:56:17 AM EST
I'm trying to learn if there's anyway to manually focus on multiple points, or if I'm just stuck with very specific areas.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:59:02 AM EST
Now if you couls somehow incorporate a sexy biotch into it.....
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 8:59:50 AM EST
beautiful.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:15:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By jdessell:
Now if you couls somehow incorporate a sexy biotch into it.....


I'd like to, as well
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:56:48 AM EST
Great detail. I love B&W.

Not sure what type of lens, but if it has a depth of field chart on it, you can determine how much will be in focus.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:03:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/28/2009 11:04:21 AM EST by LtDirector]
Originally Posted By winchester87:
Great detail. I love B&W.

Not sure what type of lens, but if it has a depth of field chart on it, you can determine how much will be in focus.


Unfortunately I know next to nothing about cameras, it's a Rebel XTI is all I know haha but I'm learning as I go along. I can figure out the required distance for things to be in focus, but not much else haha
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:21:02 AM EST
Was that rifle thrown down a driveway?

Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:29:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By strat81:
Was that rifle thrown down a driveway?



No... but I don't think it would hurt it much
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:35:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By LtDirector:
Or whatever you call it Since my lens broke, I'm having to learn about manual focus.

http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h103/feldmarschel/sightnetakwh.jpg
http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h103/feldmarschel/akwoodfornet.jpg




Sexy Avtomat Kalashnikova!!!
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:36:32 AM EST
2nd pic rawks!!
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:39:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/28/2009 11:43:23 AM EST by ColonelHurtz]
Originally Posted By LtDirector:
Originally Posted By winchester87:
Great detail. I love B&W.

Not sure what type of lens, but if it has a depth of field chart on it, you can determine how much will be in focus.


Unfortunately I know next to nothing about cameras, it's a Rebel XTI is all I know haha but I'm learning as I go along. I can figure out the required distance for things to be in focus, but not much else haha


The Depth of Field is determined by Subject Distance, Aperture and Focal Length.
Increasing FL results in decreased DOF.
Conversely, Reducing A results in greater DOF.

Focus exists at a theoretical point in space and it's plane is parallel to the film (sensor) plane.
(lenses and cameras exist that allow for non-parallel adjustment of the lens board and film plane.)
However, the area within a "circle of confusion" is perceived as in focus.

DOF and critical focus can be determined mathematically by formulae and established by physical measurement.
This is done frequently in motion picture cinematography and macro photography.

In a SLR, one can simply preview through the lens to visualize DOF.
Most 35mm SLR's have an aperture preview setting that looks through the selected aperture rather than a wide open one (the default for the viewfinder).
Some DSLR's have this feature too. Use it if you have it.

The rule of thumb is that DOF extends 1/3 in front of the focal plane and 2/3's behind it.
Barring the math, that is your take-home lesson.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:40:27 AM EST
Really nice!

Link Posted: 3/28/2009 11:44:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By ColonelHurtz:
Originally Posted By LtDirector:
Originally Posted By winchester87:
Great detail. I love B&W.

Not sure what type of lens, but if it has a depth of field chart on it, you can determine how much will be in focus.


Unfortunately I know next to nothing about cameras, it's a Rebel XTI is all I know haha but I'm learning as I go along. I can figure out the required distance for things to be in focus, but not much else haha


The Depth of Field is determined by Subject Distance, Aperture and Focal Length.
Increasing FL results in decreased DOF.
Conversely, Reducing A results in greater DOF.

Focus exists at a theoretical point in space and it's plane is parallel to the film (sensor) plane.
(lenses and cameras exist that allow for non-parallel adjustment of the lens board and film plane.)
However, the area within a "circle of confusion" is perceived as in focus.

DOF and critical focus can be determined mathematically by formulae and established by physical measurement.
This is done frequently in motion picture cinematography and macro photography.

In a SLR, one can simply preview through the lens to visualize DOF.
Most 35mm SLR's have an aperture preview setting that looks through the selected aperture rather than a wide open one (the default for the viewfinder).
Some DSLR's have this feature too. Use it if you have it.

The rule of thumb is that DOF extends 1/3 in front of the focal plane and 2/3's behind it.
Barring the math, that is your take-home lesson.


Huh... thanks for that. I'm trying to learn a bit about it all before biting the bullet and getting a new lens.
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