Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 1/28/2014 6:14:48 AM EDT
...using donated tissue.
How does the donated tissue get sterilized for implantation?
And does it get sewn in, like darning a sock?
Or do they use radio waves to alter the tissue composition and encourage it to "meld" with existing structures?

What's the typical result? Do patients acquire lost function or is it more of a bandaid to hold the knee together?

Personal stories welcome.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:15:44 AM EDT
Make sure it's not from a zombie, or you know what will happen to you.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:17:54 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PikeSlayer:
Make sure it's not from a zombie, or you know what will happen to you.
View Quote

I knew this was coming. I even started to mention the possible ramifications of same, but figured GD would be much more amusing.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:19:26 AM EDT
Don't know about donated tissue, but when I had mine done, they zipped a bunch of the torn stuff of and sewed the tear back together. I gave up running after I had it done, walk 5-7 miles a day now with no issue. For the record, their whole "you'll be back up and normal in a few days" talk is pure BS.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:23:51 AM EDT
No idea here. 13 years ago, my doc just cut out the torn part and told me I would have arthritis sooner than later. I was 16 then and thought I was 10 feet tall and bullet proof.

Good luck with your procedure and recovery.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:24:38 AM EDT
Had my ACL replaced, joint surfaces drilled and marrow re-surfaced and torn meniscus stiched up in a few places. That was 9 years ago, took a few years to heal and bend all the way.  Still get sudden pains that last from an hour to a few days mostly from just walking around but it is solid, nothing has broken loose yet.

Dr. said repairs like I had usually last 5-10yrs before needing additional work but if you are careful will last longer if you don't tear it up running/playing sports ect. Haven't been able to run since getting hit by a motorcycle at 16yrs old anways so it doesn't bother me.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:25:27 AM EDT
Have you considered asking your doctor how they perform the procedure?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:25:35 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MuXi115:
No idea here. 13 years ago, my doc just cut out the torn part and told me I would have arthritis sooner than later. I was 16 then and thought I was 10 feet tall and bullet proof.

Good luck with your procedure and recovery.
View Quote

Thanks. I'm not having it done but I know someone who is. Purely academic curiosity. And maybe, a little, caution about the zombie thing.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:26:00 AM EDT
Had mine repaired a few years ago. By repaired I mean removed about 40%. Still hurts when I jog, and I limp a little when it's cold.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:26:46 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By nashgill:
Have you considered asking your doctor how they perform the procedure?
View Quote

No, GD is a much more reliable source of information.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:29:02 AM EDT
They use your big toe.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:31:17 AM EDT
Don't know about this donated tissue stuff. I had the usual repair about 5 years ago and there was no mention of donated tissue - the doc just removed the "tag" and cleaned up the edges, then scraped and drilled my kneecap to remove a little arthritic shit and to promote blood flow.

These "scope" operations are done pretty routinely nowadays and they work well.

If the donated tissue thing is about actual cartilage being replaced, I'd be doubtful, since it gets so little blood flow that it would never grow together and heal.

But I've never even played a doctor in a movie.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:32:44 AM EDT
sorcery.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:34:15 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Db8sGr8:





No, GD is a much more reliable source of information.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Db8sGr8:



Originally Posted By nashgill:

Have you considered asking your doctor how they perform the procedure?


No, GD is a much more reliable source of information.




 
Hard to argue that  

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:38:17 AM EDT
Had my PCL replaced with donor tissue a couple years ago. Basically knotted one end, shoved through a hole drilled in femur, looped under and through the knee and screwed to the front of my shin. Donor tissue is sterilized in an oxygen rich solution that kills off the virus's and bacteria. The tissue is replaced by your own within 6 weeks +/-. The healing process should be taken seriously though and pushing yourself during the therapy is a good thing. Quicker you get your range of motion back the better. Carbon fiber bundles are one of the other options that the docs like to use. The carbon fiber is super strong and the new tissue grows to it and eventually replaces it. The carbon is just absorbed into your system.

But like someone else has said, arthritis is in the near future. Look forward to aches and pains like you have never had or knew were possible. Make sure your friend has the best doc available as well.

Best of luck with it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:48:58 AM EDT
Don't know about donated tissue but I've had 4 repairs done for meniscus tears and am going for an MRI today that may lead to my 5th.  It's getting pretty tiring.  

The donated tissue may be for a meniscus replacement and not a repair.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 8:36:21 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jsgbearpaws1:
Had my PCL replaced with donor tissue a couple years ago. Basically knotted one end, shoved through a hole drilled in femur, looped under and through the knee and screwed to the front of my shin. Donor tissue is sterilized in an oxygen rich solution that kills off the virus's and bacteria. The tissue is replaced by your own within 6 weeks +/-. The healing process should be taken seriously though and pushing yourself during the therapy is a good thing. Quicker you get your range of motion back the better. Carbon fiber bundles are one of the other options that the docs like to use. The carbon fiber is super strong and the new tissue grows to it and eventually replaces it. The carbon is just absorbed into your system.

But like someone else has said, arthritis is in the near future. Look forward to aches and pains like you have never had or knew were possible. Make sure your friend has the best doc available as well.

Best of luck with it.
View Quote

Perfect response. See, GD? This plus the humor is why I come here. A virtual clearinghouse for expertise. Such a cool place.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 2:20:44 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Db8sGr8:





Perfect response. See, GD? This plus the humor is why I come here. A virtual clearinghouse for expertise. Such a cool place.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Db8sGr8:



Originally Posted By jsgbearpaws1:

Had my PCL replaced with donor tissue a couple years ago. Basically knotted one end, shoved through a hole drilled in femur, looped under and through the knee and screwed to the front of my shin. Donor tissue is sterilized in an oxygen rich solution that kills off the virus's and bacteria. The tissue is replaced by your own within 6 weeks +/-. The healing process should be taken seriously though and pushing yourself during the therapy is a good thing. Quicker you get your range of motion back the better. Carbon fiber bundles are one of the other options that the docs like to use. The carbon fiber is super strong and the new tissue grows to it and eventually replaces it. The carbon is just absorbed into your system.



But like someone else has said, arthritis is in the near future. Look forward to aches and pains like you have never had or knew were possible. Make sure your friend has the best doc available as well.



Best of luck with it.


Perfect response. See, GD? This plus the humor is why I come here. A virtual clearinghouse for expertise. Such a cool place.




 
I'm not sure that ligament replacement is the same thing as meniscus repair.  This is where a doc would come in handy.  
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 2:41:31 PM EDT
OP
I think your getting 2 different things mixed up, torn meniscus, and torn ACL / MCL

Torn Meniscus they remove part of it,
I had that done , WALKED out of the hospital, took it easy for 2 days, 3rd day I worked 18 hours, building a MX track , then supervising the race.

ACL / MCL , uses donor tissue, or your own, MUCH more involved surgery and a LONG recovery / rehab
My daughter had her own used , ham string donor, took about 6 months to get back to 100%
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 9:08:34 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By toothandnail:
OP
I think your getting 2 different things mixed up, torn meniscus, and torn ACL / MCL

Torn Meniscus they remove part of it,
I had that done , WALKED out of the hospital, took it easy for 2 days, 3rd day I worked 18 hours, building a MX track , then supervising the race.

ACL / MCL , uses donor tissue, or your own, MUCH more involved surgery and a LONG recovery / rehab
My daughter had her own used , ham string donor, took about 6 months to get back to 100%
View Quote

Oh dear. There's a possibility this is a combination of the two procedures. My pal may have a lot of healing to do.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 9:19:34 PM EDT
Don't let them BS you...IT Will Never...Ever...Be The Same. Be set to lead a low impact life style
for you own good. Biking, Walking, Swimming...Guy at work is on his second cut and sew.
Top Top