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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/14/2005 6:10:18 PM EDT
They already have them in Mexico?

How long before it spills over into Texas? Anyone know if this story is true???

Drug dealers have them, will they use them? Find out here



Outgunned cops patrol only part of border city
Web Posted: 07/31/2005 12:00 AM CDT

Lisa Sandberg
Express-News Staff Writer

NUEVO LAREDO — When masked gunmen attacked a house in the upscale Campestre neighborhood Thursday night, they fired rocket-propelled grenades and semi-automatic rifles.

When about 80 members of the city's brand new police force reported for duty last week, there weren't enough guns to go around. Officers had to share their weapons, turning their guns in after their shifts.

While rival drug lords fire with impunity — wherever it strikes their fancy it seems — the new police force is restricted for the time being to the city's central district.

"We're waiting for more personnel and armaments," said Jesus Muro Garcia, 29, commander of the municipal plaza substation. "Their weapons are a lot more powerful than anything we have."

Welcome to the streets of this Mexican border city, where an out-of-control turf war among drug cartels has left more than 100 dead this year, including almost a dozen police officers. And last month, the city's new police chief was killed six hours after assuming office. A new police chief, Omar Pimentel Zúñiga, since has been appointed.

The escalating violence apparently has proved too unsettling for U.S. Ambassador Tony Garza, who Friday, citing the "unusually advanced weaponry" used in the Thursday night attack, announced he was shutting the consulate for at least a week.

Since earlier this year, the State Department had issued a travel advisory warning Americans to take caution when traveling to the border region, specifically in Nuevo Laredo.

The advisory was extended recently.

By most accounts, the recent attack was particularly brazen. According to media reports, more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition were fired, turning quiet Mexicali Street in the tony Campestre neighborhood into a virtual war zone.

Using rocket-propelled grenades, assailants tore three big holes through the blue outer wall of a once-charming house. Windows a full block away were shattered. A 15-minute shootout ensued between those inside the house and the attackers.

No one was believed killed in the battle, and no one has been arrested, though Muro said several people at the home may have been kidnapped. He did not know who lived there.

Rosa Estela Manzanales, 56, was sitting in her courtyard two doors down when the first of several explosions shattered the calm of a humid late July night.

"It was worse than a war," she said of the 8 p.m. attack.

"I thought it was only in movies, but right here," she said, pointing around her, "with our grandchildren and everything. I don't know how we are still alive."

She and 11 members of her family — children and grandchildren — dove for the concrete floor of their humble home that sits amid opulent houses. She and her family remained, trembling but quiet, until the last weapon had gone silent.

The police arrived afterward, she said, to mop up the mess.

Manzanales said she knew the family in the blue house only casually. They were recent arrivals to the neighborhood, renters she believed, who seemed pleasant and well adjusted.

She has come to accept that the violence now has spread to her quiet Mexicali Street, which was wilderness when her family settled it many decades ago. But things are different now.

"You go out, and you don't come back," she said.

In all, 460 city police officers have been cleared to return to work six weeks after 700 of them were yanked off the street in a massive anti-corruption probe.

The returning officers have cleared a host of evaluations, including polygraph and drug tests.

The entire force was tainted by indications that officers have been rewarded by or intimidated into working for drug cartels fighting for control of smuggling routes into South Texas.

But only those whose weapons have been delivered are back on patrol, Muro said. Others mill about the downtown substation in their pressed black and white new uniforms, filled with a restless nervousness.

"We don't have the arms necessary to do this job," said a five-year-patrol officer who gave his name only as Carlos. "You see what they have — grenades, sophisticated arms."

At least four of Carlos' colleagues from the substation have been killed in the past year. Two were shot to death in broad daylight five blocks from the police station.

Officials have said many city cops work as lookouts for the Gulf Cartel, which is alleged to control the lucrative drug smuggling routes into South Texas.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman of the Sinaloa Cartel and his allies are vying for the turf, which is believed to be part of the reason for the police deaths.

Muro said his family and friends all beg him to "do something else."

"A lot of times I think about leaving," he said.

But in the end, he notes, "I like the work."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
lsandberg@express-news.net
As originally published, this story contained an error. = (Because of an editing error, a story on Sunday about violence in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, misstated the duration of the U.S. State Department's travel advisory. The travel warning was extended last week. Also, the story mentioned the June killing of the city's police chief without clarifying that a new chief since has been appointed.)


Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:11:58 PM EDT
I believe they've been here for a long time already. Too bad we can't raid every single mosque in this country....I'll bet we'd find some very interesting weapons.

HH
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:13:23 PM EDT
I have this theory on convenient stores...
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:14:03 PM EDT
So they can get their hands on RPG's, but they can't convert a rifle to auto fire?


Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:14:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 6:15:46 PM EDT by Sukebe]
I have no doubt that all kinds of ordnance is hidden out there somewhere. Mortars, RPG's/rocket launchers, grenades, mines, SAM's and of course, small arms of all types. If you can smuggle tons of drugs, you can smuggle tons of weapons. The question is; When will they (anyone) start using them?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:14:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lippo:
They already have them in Mexico?

How long before it spills over into Texas? Anyone know if this story is true???

Drug dealers have them, will they use them? Find out here



Outgunned cops patrol only part of border city
Web Posted: 07/31/2005 12:00 AM CDT

Lisa Sandberg
Express-News Staff Writer

NUEVO LAREDO — When masked gunmen attacked a house in the upscale Campestre neighborhood Thursday night, they fired rocket-propelled grenades and semi-automatic rifles.

When about 80 members of the city's brand new police force reported for duty last week, there weren't enough guns to go around. Officers had to share their weapons, turning their guns in after their shifts.

While rival drug lords fire with impunity — wherever it strikes their fancy it seems — the new police force is restricted for the time being to the city's central district.

"We're waiting for more personnel and armaments," said Jesus Muro Garcia, 29, commander of the municipal plaza substation. "Their weapons are a lot more powerful than anything we have."

Welcome to the streets of this Mexican border city, where an out-of-control turf war among drug cartels has left more than 100 dead this year, including almost a dozen police officers. And last month, the city's new police chief was killed six hours after assuming office. A new police chief, Omar Pimentel Zúñiga, since has been appointed.

The escalating violence apparently has proved too unsettling for U.S. Ambassador Tony Garza, who Friday, citing the "unusually advanced weaponry" used in the Thursday night attack, announced he was shutting the consulate for at least a week.

Since earlier this year, the State Department had issued a travel advisory warning Americans to take caution when traveling to the border region, specifically in Nuevo Laredo.

The advisory was extended recently.

By most accounts, the recent attack was particularly brazen. According to media reports, more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition were fired, turning quiet Mexicali Street in the tony Campestre neighborhood into a virtual war zone.

Using rocket-propelled grenades, assailants tore three big holes through the blue outer wall of a once-charming house. Windows a full block away were shattered. A 15-minute shootout ensued between those inside the house and the attackers.

No one was believed killed in the battle, and no one has been arrested, though Muro said several people at the home may have been kidnapped. He did not know who lived there.

Rosa Estela Manzanales, 56, was sitting in her courtyard two doors down when the first of several explosions shattered the calm of a humid late July night.

"It was worse than a war," she said of the 8 p.m. attack.

"I thought it was only in movies, but right here," she said, pointing around her, "with our grandchildren and everything. I don't know how we are still alive."

She and 11 members of her family — children and grandchildren — dove for the concrete floor of their humble home that sits amid opulent houses. She and her family remained, trembling but quiet, until the last weapon had gone silent.

The police arrived afterward, she said, to mop up the mess.

Manzanales said she knew the family in the blue house only casually. They were recent arrivals to the neighborhood, renters she believed, who seemed pleasant and well adjusted.

She has come to accept that the violence now has spread to her quiet Mexicali Street, which was wilderness when her family settled it many decades ago. But things are different now.

"You go out, and you don't come back," she said.

In all, 460 city police officers have been cleared to return to work six weeks after 700 of them were yanked off the street in a massive anti-corruption probe.

The returning officers have cleared a host of evaluations, including polygraph and drug tests.

The entire force was tainted by indications that officers have been rewarded by or intimidated into working for drug cartels fighting for control of smuggling routes into South Texas.

But only those whose weapons have been delivered are back on patrol, Muro said. Others mill about the downtown substation in their pressed black and white new uniforms, filled with a restless nervousness.

"We don't have the arms necessary to do this job," said a five-year-patrol officer who gave his name only as Carlos. "You see what they have — grenades, sophisticated arms."

At least four of Carlos' colleagues from the substation have been killed in the past year. Two were shot to death in broad daylight five blocks from the police station.

Officials have said many city cops work as lookouts for the Gulf Cartel, which is alleged to control the lucrative drug smuggling routes into South Texas.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman of the Sinaloa Cartel and his allies are vying for the turf, which is believed to be part of the reason for the police deaths.

Muro said his family and friends all beg him to "do something else."

"A lot of times I think about leaving," he said.

But in the end, he notes, "I like the work."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
lsandberg@express-news.net
As originally published, this story contained an error. = (Because of an editing error, a story on Sunday about violence in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, misstated the duration of the U.S. State Department's travel advisory. The travel warning was extended last week. Also, the story mentioned the June killing of the city's police chief without clarifying that a new chief since has been appointed.)





may I be the first to say, Their GOV have weapons. this is just another liberal bull session.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:15:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:19:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 6:19:42 PM EDT by bblake00]
I have a crate of them in my locker in the squad bay.

I traded a SSDG (Space Shuttle Door Gunner) for them. I let him ride second seat on the last mission when we flew CAP for some Space Rangers.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:20:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:20:19 PM EDT
what ever happened to that story about the Mistral recovered in Maryland back in '94...?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:20:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bblake00:
I have a crate of them in my locker in the squad bay.

I traded a SSDG (Space Shuttle Door Gunner) for them. I let him ride second seat on the last mission when we flew CAP for some Space Rangers.



SWARM SWARM SWARM
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:23:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By bblake00:
I have a crate of them in my locker in the squad bay.

I traded a SSDG (Space Shuttle Door Gunner) for them. I let him ride second seat on the last mission when we flew CAP for some Space Rangers.



SWARM SWARM SWARM



HUT,HUT,HUT,HUT,HUT,HUT,HUT,HU­T...................................
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:24:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MachinegunManiac:
I have this theory on convenient stores...



"So... Muhammed... interested in todays' coffee and hotdog special?"
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:24:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bblake00:
I have a crate of them in my locker in the squad bay.

I traded a SSDG (Space Shuttle Door Gunner) for them. I let him ride second seat on the last mission when we flew CAP for some Space Rangers.



Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:25:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TrashHeap:

Originally Posted By lippo:
They already have them in Mexico?

How long before it spills over into Texas? Anyone know if this story is true???

Drug dealers have them, will they use them? Find out here



Outgunned cops patrol only part of border city
Web Posted: 07/31/2005 12:00 AM CDT

Lisa Sandberg
Express-News Staff Writer

NUEVO LAREDO — When masked gunmen attacked a house in the upscale Campestre neighborhood Thursday night, they fired rocket-propelled grenades and semi-automatic rifles.

When about 80 members of the city's brand new police force reported for duty last week, there weren't enough guns to go around. Officers had to share their weapons, turning their guns in after their shifts.

While rival drug lords fire with impunity — wherever it strikes their fancy it seems — the new police force is restricted for the time being to the city's central district.

"We're waiting for more personnel and armaments," said Jesus Muro Garcia, 29, commander of the municipal plaza substation. "Their weapons are a lot more powerful than anything we have."

Welcome to the streets of this Mexican border city, where an out-of-control turf war among drug cartels has left more than 100 dead this year, including almost a dozen police officers. And last month, the city's new police chief was killed six hours after assuming office. A new police chief, Omar Pimentel Zúñiga, since has been appointed.

The escalating violence apparently has proved too unsettling for U.S. Ambassador Tony Garza, who Friday, citing the "unusually advanced weaponry" used in the Thursday night attack, announced he was shutting the consulate for at least a week.

Since earlier this year, the State Department had issued a travel advisory warning Americans to take caution when traveling to the border region, specifically in Nuevo Laredo.

The advisory was extended recently.

By most accounts, the recent attack was particularly brazen. According to media reports, more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition were fired, turning quiet Mexicali Street in the tony Campestre neighborhood into a virtual war zone.

Using rocket-propelled grenades, assailants tore three big holes through the blue outer wall of a once-charming house. Windows a full block away were shattered. A 15-minute shootout ensued between those inside the house and the attackers.

No one was believed killed in the battle, and no one has been arrested, though Muro said several people at the home may have been kidnapped. He did not know who lived there.

Rosa Estela Manzanales, 56, was sitting in her courtyard two doors down when the first of several explosions shattered the calm of a humid late July night.

"It was worse than a war," she said of the 8 p.m. attack.

"I thought it was only in movies, but right here," she said, pointing around her, "with our grandchildren and everything. I don't know how we are still alive."

She and 11 members of her family — children and grandchildren — dove for the concrete floor of their humble home that sits amid opulent houses. She and her family remained, trembling but quiet, until the last weapon had gone silent.

The police arrived afterward, she said, to mop up the mess.

Manzanales said she knew the family in the blue house only casually. They were recent arrivals to the neighborhood, renters she believed, who seemed pleasant and well adjusted.

She has come to accept that the violence now has spread to her quiet Mexicali Street, which was wilderness when her family settled it many decades ago. But things are different now.

"You go out, and you don't come back," she said.

In all, 460 city police officers have been cleared to return to work six weeks after 700 of them were yanked off the street in a massive anti-corruption probe.

The returning officers have cleared a host of evaluations, including polygraph and drug tests.

The entire force was tainted by indications that officers have been rewarded by or intimidated into working for drug cartels fighting for control of smuggling routes into South Texas.

But only those whose weapons have been delivered are back on patrol, Muro said. Others mill about the downtown substation in their pressed black and white new uniforms, filled with a restless nervousness.

"We don't have the arms necessary to do this job," said a five-year-patrol officer who gave his name only as Carlos. "You see what they have — grenades, sophisticated arms."

At least four of Carlos' colleagues from the substation have been killed in the past year. Two were shot to death in broad daylight five blocks from the police station.

Officials have said many city cops work as lookouts for the Gulf Cartel, which is alleged to control the lucrative drug smuggling routes into South Texas.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman of the Sinaloa Cartel and his allies are vying for the turf, which is believed to be part of the reason for the police deaths.

Muro said his family and friends all beg him to "do something else."

"A lot of times I think about leaving," he said.

But in the end, he notes, "I like the work."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
lsandberg@express-news.net
As originally published, this story contained an error. = (Because of an editing error, a story on Sunday about violence in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, misstated the duration of the U.S. State Department's travel advisory. The travel warning was extended last week. Also, the story mentioned the June killing of the city's police chief without clarifying that a new chief since has been appointed.)





may I be the first to say, Their GOV have weapons. this is just another liberal bull session.




Why did you have to quote the whole fucking thing?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:27:21 PM EDT
I though about this while driving next to a refinery in TX, a couple of RPG rounds could do some serious damage.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:27:29 PM EDT
I'm surprised they are not here already.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:31:05 PM EDT
This is actually not all that new. A family member of mine stationed in Laredo, TX, just across the river, tells me of an incident in 2003 wherein a number of drug dealers got into a firefight with the Mexican Federales in Nuevo Laredo.

Quite a few RPG rounds were fired, with resultant casualties.

It's only a matter of time, I suppose.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:32:10 PM EDT
Good thing firearms are illegal in Mexico. Otherwise, they would have a big FREAKING problem on their hands.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:33:40 PM EDT
Some of you guys are real dumbasses... how is this a liberal plot to take away the 2A? It's a friggen' alien problem with no real border policy!

I fucking swear, half the threads have some sort "liberals to blame" witch hunt theme...

Annoying issues in life: Blame a liberal!
Crimes caused by illegals and previous offenders going up: Blame liberals!

Anyone else have the balls just to say stop blaming only one group (though they do some real insane and BS'esque stuff), and realize their are other reasons to this?

Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:33:44 PM EDT
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:34:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:
Good thing firearms are illegal in Mexico. Otherwise, they would have a big FREAKING problem on their hands.




Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:37:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?

Since they are designed to penetrate armored vehicles, I'd have to say they can, and with ease.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:39:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank.

Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:39:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sukebe:
I have no doubt that all kinds of ordnance is hidden out there somewhere. Mortars, RPG's/rocket launchers, grenades, mines, SAM's and of course, small arms of all types. If you can smuggle tons of drugs, you can smuggle tons of weapons. The question is; When will they (anyone) start using them?



Except why smuggle weapons when drugs are so much more profitable.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:45:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LongueCarabine:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank.

Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.

Not real familiar with an RPG(I know a LAW would do it),but it would be a REAL shitstorm if RPGs were fired at a high production refinery,OR a chemical plant near population.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:52:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LongueCarabine:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank. Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.



I hope you have a lot of reloads available !

Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:10:20 PM EDT
Even the mighty Abrams, if hit by enough of these, can be disabled. Somehow, I doubt that, if the people who wish us harm are actually getting these through, they will only want one or two to do their dirty business.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:12:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fadedsun:

Originally Posted By LongueCarabine:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank. Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.



I hope you have a lot of reloads available !




It's been done in one hit, but they were modified from stolen Russian testing prototypes...
Almost what the Chechans made now to fight the Russians...

Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:18:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:

Originally Posted By LongueCarabine:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank.

Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.

Not real familiar with an RPG(I know a LAW would do it),but it would be a REAL shitstorm if RPGs were fired at a high production refinery,OR a chemical plant near population.



You're thinking too big. Almost every stop-n-rob around here has one of those gas grill bottle storage cages out front. 3-400 lbs of bottle gas exploding on a busy, rush hour afternoon would get them the terror results they're looking for.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:30:14 PM EDT
I've been buying them by the trunk load every since the assault weapon ban ended.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:34:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dracster:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:

Originally Posted By LongueCarabine:

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:
Can an RPG pierce an oil storage tank?


**********************************­***********************************

Yo­u're kidding, right???? These things can, if properly deployed, disable or destroy an Abrams tank.

Oil storage tanks are made of steel that is usually no more than .5" or .75" thick.

Not real familiar with an RPG(I know a LAW would do it),but it would be a REAL shitstorm if RPGs were fired at a high production refinery,OR a chemical plant near population.



You're thinking too big. Almost every stop-n-rob around here has one of those gas grill bottle storage cages out front. 3-400 lbs of bottle gas exploding on a busy, rush hour afternoon would get them the terror results they're looking for.

No,I'm not either! Think of what an attack would do to the price of gas/diesel/jet fuel/ect... Hit us right in the economic pocketbook.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:35:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:
Good thing firearms are illegal in Mexico. Otherwise, they would have a big FREAKING problem on their hands.



The availiabliity of firearms in the US is the problem, if ya hadn't heard.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 7:41:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Goonboss:

Originally Posted By thompsondd:
Good thing firearms are illegal in Mexico. Otherwise, they would have a big FREAKING problem on their hands.



The availiabliity of firearms in the US is the problem, if ya hadn't heard.



So where in the US can you get an RPG? I'm going to Juarez next month (again, damnit).
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