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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/1/2005 6:55:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 6:56:12 PM EDT by Wash-Ar15]
my son is still on trainig wheeels and refuses to take them off. i tried taking them off but he froze up every time.

what method did you use to teach your kids how to ride.

my son is compltetly different than my daughter. I took off her training wheels and she rode off into the sunset without falling once.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 6:59:00 PM EDT
Just keep raising them higher
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 6:59:52 PM EDT
Take the training wheels off and he doesn't get dinner until he can ride the bike.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:00:12 PM EDT
Most training wheels can be adjusted up. Do it when he's not looking. I did it that way for my daughter. Eventually she decided on her own she didn't need them. Do the same with your son.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:01:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:01:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Just keep raising them higher



+1

When you take them off, just jog beside him holding the seat. After a few minutes just let go. From there they will teach themselves.

OH, and if you can find a lawn or grassy area at a park that has a slight down hill grade, it works well.
CH
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:02:22 PM EDT
bolt and no nut, they will fall off as he is riding. Will either keep on riding or fall.....
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:03:23 PM EDT
I think my dad loosened the God Damn bolts on mine...

It worked
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:04:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 7:04:33 PM EDT by macman37]
Easy, my dad just started me off with a little push at the top of the stairs.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:06:12 PM EDT
On the Fourth of July this year, I was helping one of my brothers-in-law put a motorcycle back together at the in-laws' house. I had my tools there, since I hate using other people's tools. I had my girls' bikes there too. My older daughter (whose birthday is the Fourth!) had been after me to take the training wheels offf her bike. After dinner, she was REALLY on meto take them off, so I did. I told her that she would probably fall over some, so I'd be right there to catch her. I had my left hand on the handlebars, and my right hand on the seat. She got on, started pedaling, and that was it! She just took off and left me in the dust!
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:06:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:09:11 PM EDT
Not old enough to have kids, but I remember what happened with me.

We were at my cousins house and all my cousins and my brother wanted to go for a bike ride, and they had an extra bike, but no training wheels. I got on and rode away. When we got home my dad went and took the training wheels off my bike right away.

Basically, it's a confidence thing, not a skill thing.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:10:04 PM EDT
I just kind of figured it out one day.

I tried it a few times before with my parents help and failed. Then one day I just did it. I think alot of it is just getting older and not being afraid of it anymore.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:12:05 PM EDT
Take me off and push the bike and let go.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:16:28 PM EDT
When the kid's ready to have them off they'll come off. Let her decide. What difference does it make? You crawl, then walk, then run. You ride a bike with 4 wheels, then one day its 2. They grow up fast enough.

JM2CW ( and 2 kids later)
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:17:06 PM EDT
Take one of the training wheels off. He can lean on the one until he gets brave enough to balance the bike without relying on the training wheel. A friend told me about this when I was weaning my daughter off of training wheels. She had it in a few days.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:22:21 PM EDT
My oldest son is much more cautious than my youngest son. The older one was 6, or 7 before he would ride a bike without training wheels.

The youngest demanded them off at 4 and was riding on his own 10 minutes later.

I think the thing that helped the most was riding a scooter. You have to balance, but it isn't nearly as complicated as the bike and its not far to step off. Either way kids are different and some have a much more cautious outlook on everything and like to avoid getting hurt. Other kids are oblivious to danger and seem almost fearless.



Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:23:31 PM EDT
I have taught all of my kids to ride by affixing these to their bike and riding along. Put your hands inside of theirs on the handle bars and ride on the pegs. Granted. You need to go down a slight grade. The big trick is showing them how you can balance by slightly steering into the direction of the fall. You purposely drive the bike in curving pattern to show how the balancing is done. Usually takes 3 or 4 half hour sessions. They start by driving all over the place to stay up and then, as their balance improves, they ride straighter.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:26:12 PM EDT
Was hanging onto my kids bike seat while letting her pedal around the field. Must of ran miles with her while hanging onto the seat while she was pedaling over the course of a week or so. I finally got the feeling she was ready to go, so I simply let go................she pedaled away and screamed back at me.........."look Daddy, I'm doing it".

I almost cried.

vmax84


Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:28:37 PM EDT
nope, didn't cry............but I could feel a tear or two stream down my face. I was so proud of my little kid.

vmax84
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:30:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cape_hunter:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Just keep raising them higher



+1

When you take them off, just jog beside him holding the seat. After a few minutes just let go. From there they will teach themselves.

OH, and if you can find a lawn or grassy area at a park that has a slight down hill grade, it works well.
CH



+1

That's how my dad did it with me. I had no problem whatsoever.

I would recommend doing that and holding him until he's good to go.

But anyways, I'm sure in a few years you'll be upset at how fast he's growing up, just let him take them off when he feels ready.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:35:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vmax84:
Was hanging onto my kids bike seat while letting her pedal around the field. Must of ran miles with her while hanging onto the seat while she was pedaling over the course of a week or so. I finally got the feeling she was ready to go, so I simply let go................she pedaled away and screamed back at me.........."look Daddy, I'm doing it".

I almost cried.

vmax84






I'm looking forward to have the same experience, a few years down the road.

Thanks for posting.


Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:44:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vmax84:
Was hanging onto my kids bike seat while letting her pedal around the field. Must of ran miles with her while hanging onto the seat while she was pedaling over the course of a week or so. I finally got the feeling she was ready to go, so I simply let go................she pedaled away and screamed back at me.........."look Daddy, I'm doing it".



Very similar to what my daughter and I did a couple of weeks ago.

It's a great feeling.



Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:49:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 888:

Originally Posted By vmax84:
Was hanging onto my kids bike seat while letting her pedal around the field. Must of ran miles with her while hanging onto the seat while she was pedaling over the course of a week or so. I finally got the feeling she was ready to go, so I simply let go................she pedaled away and screamed back at me.........."look Daddy, I'm doing it".

I almost cried.

vmax84






I'm looking forward to have the same experience, a few years down the road.

Thanks for posting.





I have forgotten so many things in life, but I will never forget letting go of her bike seat, switching my running to a stop, and watching her pedal away. Never.

vmax84
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:51:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DrMark:

Originally Posted By vmax84:
Was hanging onto my kids bike seat while letting her pedal around the field. Must of ran miles with her while hanging onto the seat while she was pedaling over the course of a week or so. I finally got the feeling she was ready to go, so I simply let go................she pedaled away and screamed back at me.........."look Daddy, I'm doing it".



Very similar to what my daughter and I did a couple of weeks ago.

It's a great feeling.







Bet ya' won't forget it either, huh?!! Wonderful feeling watching your kid make improvements.

vmax84
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:54:03 PM EDT
Two things that really helped my boy last year:

Lower the seat enough that the kid can touch the ground easily. It make it easier to get started.

Have him start with a pedal at about a 10 o'clock position so that he can step down on it to get a fast, powerful start. It's easier to keep going upright with the initial burst of speed.


Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:05:20 PM EDT
Use a scooter first, they get the hang of balance really quickly and then can go right to a bike with no training wheels.
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