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Posted: 12/12/2013 4:53:10 PM EST
Hog hunt is planned.
Secluded land.
Very primitive camping, limited to what you pretty much hump in plus hunting gear.
Weather that weekend is predicted low of 20 with windchill in the teens

I am no stranger to camping but never that cold under what basically will be a tarp for possible rain.

What's your best tip to not become a Popsicle ?

Can two quality 32 degree sleeping bags stuffed inside each other work well enough?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:53:54 PM EST
Sounds like a warm day to me.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:54:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
What's your best tip to not become a Popsicle ?
View Quote


Stay in a hotel
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:54:42 PM EST
Light sheet, shorts, and a tshirt, good sleepin' weather.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:55:42 PM EST
As long as you and your "buddy" wear Ugg boots inside your double sleeping bag, you should be fine.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:56:33 PM EST
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:57:48 PM EST
For real, layers are your friend. What kind of sleeping bags? If one is a mummy that will help. Both of those plus sweat pants sweatshirt etc and you should be fine.

That said I know you Southern people are big babies when it comes to cold so maybe I'm overestimating you.

You can come up here if you want, its -20 before the wind, and you can dig a hole in the snow bank tobsleep in. That's always fun.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:58:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:00:32 PM EST by raven]
STAY DRY

Don't wear cotton anything. Wear polypro under garments if you are going to be exerting yourself to the point you sweat. It will wick moisture off your skin and dry quickly.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:59:02 PM EST
Grab a five piece modular sleep system off ebay with bivy bag and youll be nice and toasty..
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:59:43 PM EST
Jesus Tap Dancing Christ!

Sounds like being in the damn Army.



Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:00:05 PM EST
Double woven wool blanket.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:00:48 PM EST
Camping 20 degrees out?

Naked face down in the dirt next to the fire should work.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:01:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:02:00 PM EST by raven]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cpt_Kirks:
Jesus Tap Dancing Christ!

Sounds like being in the damn Army.



View Quote
Sounds like my childhood. I think my dad had me so he could have someone to go on hikes and camping with, even in the winter.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:01:37 PM EST
Add beans to your chili to keep the fart sack warm.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:01:38 PM EST
Hunt in the summer. There's no season for hogs.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:02:01 PM EST

Texas? I hear this is how you guys keep warm at night. Not that there's anything wrong with it.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:02:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:03:53 PM EST by Paulie771]
USGI gortex bivvy sack is the best piece of kit the US ever created. Carry something to keep you off the ground (sleeping pad at the least), wool, no cotton, boil water and put it in a nalgene bottle to keep your sack warm.

You're still going to freeze.

Embrace the suck.

ETA: also, the temp rating on bags is wishful thinking at best. I froze my ass off with both bags and the bivvy on a 11* night in TN with wool base layer and the above nalgene trick. Might have managed 4 hours, if that.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:03:12 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By viper5194:
Grab a five piece modular sleep system off ebay with bivy bag and youll be nice and toasty..
View Quote


For the same price, book a fucking motel.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:03:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:04:48 PM EST by Saber7]
Having a good sleeping pad is key. The ground will suck the heat out of you.

I use a REI egg crate type foam pad or the USGI foam roll up pad. Two 32 degree bags will work. I use the USGI summer bag and a snug pak bag.

Bring a small stove to boil water for coffee. Hot food will keep you warm.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:03:38 PM EST
If you have or can borrow a backpacking tent that would help with wind chill. You lose a majority of the heat out of your head so wear a stocking cap. You should be fine layering the bags. Remember to add 10 or 15 degrees to the sleeping bag temp to where you will be comfy.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:03:44 PM EST

Lots of layers and hand warmers. When its cold I usually take another blanket to put over my head. Put something on ground as thick as possible to keep off cold Ground.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:03:45 PM EST
Just buy one good 15° bag I prefer Marmot gear. Wear a hat to bed and eat a Snickers or something right before bed the calories help keep you warm.
And wear a hat to sleep in.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:05:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.
View Quote


Seriously?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:05:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.
View Quote

Based on my experience, I disagree with this part in red, with the caveat that the clothes you sleep in need to be dry. If you sleep in the same long johns you wear during the day, which will be moist with perspiration, you will be cold.

OP, you must have a good ground pad. I don't recommend an air matress unless you get a high quality one intended for cold weather camping, with a poly fill to keep the air inside from moving around and conducting away your body heat. You're probably better off with a good, closed cell foam pad. If you don't have a good pad, heat will be conducted right out of your body into the ground. I'd also recommend a Gore Tex bivy sack around your sleeping bag to block wind and moisture.

Wear a knit cap and socks when you go to bed. Get some good merino wool socks. Merino wool doesn't itch and retains insulating value even when wet.

A space blanket/USGI casualty evacuation blanket is a good, light weight accessory to add warmth and block the wind. They are good ground sheets and can also be taped or strung up on the underside of your tarp to reflect heat back down onto you. If you wrap it around your bag you'll wake up wet, though. They are impermeable to water vapor.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:05:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
Sounds like my childhood. I think my dad had me so he could have someone to go on hikes and camping with, even in the winter.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By Cpt_Kirks:
Jesus Tap Dancing Christ!

Sounds like being in the damn Army.



Sounds like my childhood. I think my dad had me so he could have someone to go on hikes and camping with, even in the winter.


Sounds like way Northern Germany in February to me. Froze my ass off too many times.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:07:26 PM EST
1.) Go to Sams
2.) Buy pre-packaged bacon
3.) Profit

Then again, I'm a Texan and 20 degree weather is too freaking cold to be camping in!!

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:08:46 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dave_Markowitz:

Based on my experience, I disagree with this part in red, with the caveat that the clothes you sleep in need to be dry. If you sleep in the same long johns you wear during the day, which will be moist with perspiration, you will be cold.
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Originally Posted By Dave_Markowitz:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.

Based on my experience, I disagree with this part in red, with the caveat that the clothes you sleep in need to be dry. If you sleep in the same long johns you wear during the day, which will be moist with perspiration, you will be cold.
Make sure your longjohns are polypro, and they won't be wet.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:09:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By viper5194:
Grab a five piece modular sleep system off ebay with bivy bag and youll be nice and toasty..
View Quote



bought one after freezing my ass off in 16 degree weather. did a camout 2 years ago that was 24 degrees. I was in the black bag inside the bivy and a therma rest under me. i was toasty toast warm. its a heavy bitch but it will keep your ass warm.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:09:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:12:16 PM EST by DonKey153]
A low of 20 won't be too bad.

A good sleeping bag, a tent, maybe a pad to keep off the ground and you're set. I usually scatter leaves/pine needles underneath the tent to make things a bit softer to sleep on. Not sure how much insulating value it has, but it makes things more comfortable. Boots stay inside the tent BTW.

For clothes, use long johns, an insulating layer, and a waterproof outer layer. Bonus points if your insulating layer is water resistant too.
Waterproof boots, no cotton socks, just common sense stuff.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:09:47 PM EST
Its 9 here.


How we camp in this weather is easy.


You don't.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:10:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By Dave_Markowitz:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.

Based on my experience, I disagree with this part in red, with the caveat that the clothes you sleep in need to be dry. If you sleep in the same long johns you wear during the day, which will be moist with perspiration, you will be cold.
Make sure your longjohns are polypro, and they won't be wet.

Agreed. I like Patagonia Capilene, but there are other good brands as well.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:10:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:15:13 PM EST by buckshot_jim]
Recon 4 sleeping bag with thermarest ridge rest pad and goretex bivy cover. Smart wool socks, mittens, not gloves. watch cap, not silly hat, and make sure you dress in layers. This is the winning deal.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:11:11 PM EST
Since a few have asked, it's a Snugpack mummy stuffed inside another Coleman 32 degree mummy. Then slide both into an REI waterproof bivy. Surprisingly using compression bags the set up is not too insanely bulky
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:11:11 PM EST
Get a good outfitter tent with a wood burning stove.
Get a cot to keep your ass off the ground.
Get a good sleeping bag rated for the temperature.
Keep your stuff dry and secure.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:11:23 PM EST
I don't camp in the winter unless I have to for work.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:12:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Paulie771:
USGI gortex bivvy sack is the best piece of kit the US ever created. Carry something to keep you off the ground (sleeping pad at the least), wool, no cotton, boil water and put it in a nalgene bottle to keep your sack warm.

You're still going to freeze.

Embrace the suck.

ETA: also, the temp rating on bags is wishful thinking at best. I froze my ass off with both bags and the bivvy on a 11* night in TN with wool base layer and the above nalgene trick. Might have managed 4 hours, if that.
View Quote



yeah you did'nt insulate from the ground. I've been in just the black bag at 24 degrees and was so toasty warm i had no idea i was 24 out till i pulled my head out. holy shit. that was cold.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:12:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:

Make sure your longjohns are polypro, and they won't be wet.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By Dave_Markowitz:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.

Based on my experience, I disagree with this part in red, with the caveat that the clothes you sleep in need to be dry. If you sleep in the same long johns you wear during the day, which will be moist with perspiration, you will be cold.

Make sure your longjohns are polypro, and they won't be wet.


I like Smartwool and other 'soft' wool underwear that doesn't scratch, but they simply aren't as durable as polypropylene. I have a lot of that as well.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:13:09 PM EST
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Originally Posted By EPOCH96:


Seriously?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.


Seriously?


Very seriously.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:13:27 PM EST
No cotton where it counts. Synthetic t-shirt, wool or Smartwool socks, a good windbreaker as a layer. Good footwear. Waterproof your boots.

The tarp part is a killer. I'd go for a tent if it was available.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:13:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WrightP:
If you have or can borrow a backpacking tent that would help with wind chill. You lose a majority of the heat out of your head so wear a stocking cap. You should be fine layering the bags. Remember to add 10 or 15 degrees to the sleeping bag temp to where you will be comfy.
View Quote



get a wool one.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:14:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Get a good outfitter tent with a wood burning stove.
Get a cot to keep your ass off the ground.
Get a good sleeping bag rated for the temperature.
Keep your stuff dry and secure.

http://m7.i.pbase.com/g3/72/325172/2/123744897.CJf1rUL3.jpg
View Quote


Say no to cots, hammocks and the bare ground when sleeping in cold temperatures. a foam sleeping pad has insulating qualities that will make life much better.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:14:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:


Seriously?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.


Seriously?


shorts t-shirt and whitey tighties work for me.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:15:00 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:

Get a cot to keep your ass off the ground.
View Quote


Absolutely. Or a Therma-rest. Thermodynamically, you will lose your attempt to heat the Earth.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:15:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:


Seriously?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
A sleeping pad under the bag will help a lot as will a sleeping hat.
You will be warmer if you DON'T sleep in your long johns.

In Alaska I would put my poncho liner inside my bag for extra warmth.


Seriously?


Yes. I spent a lot of time sleeping in a tent during the winter in Alaska courtesy of Uncle Sam. I thought it was a load of horseshit too until I tried it. Just underwear and a t-shirt.

I also figured out that if you put your clothes you are going to wear the next day in the bag with you they will be warm the next morning.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:16:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:17:17 PM EST by lethal_addiction]
20 degrees isn't that cold, but it is a little cold.

IF you have the money I would suggest getting a -20 degree synthetic bag. You can probably get a decent one for $275 but I army it's been awhile since I've bought a new one. A -20 will keep you comfortable. A 32 degree bag will NOT. Understand that the way they rate sleeping bags. Whatever the bag is rated for, that is the minimum temp that an average person can survive through the night and not die of hypothermia. You would be up all night shivering your balls off in 32 degrees with your 32 degree bag. Not recommended to go lower.

And don't listen to that myth that sleeping without long johns is better than with. That a load of crap. Get a pair of nice "expedition weight" Merino wool (poor bunnies ) uppers and lowers.

Put the socks you wore for the day in your bag when you sleep and they will dry out. Put all your water in the bag (keep in container) otherwise it may freeze. Also any lighters you have must go in the bag as well... resist the urge to play with them before you sleep.

Ground pad is very important.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:16:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 5:17:40 PM EST by Ammon]
Im in wichita falls and have been sleeping in my car for the last 10 weeks. Lately the condensation has been freezing in the inside of my vehicle so its below 32 though probably not in the low 20s. With that said i sleep in a 30 degree stuffed in a 40 degree and stay toasty except for my face outside the bag.

Edit. The 30 degree bag was 15 bucks reg price at academy, the 40 degree was 9 bucks reg price at academy
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:17:23 PM EST
Y'all Texans are soft.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:18:21 PM EST
One other thing worth mentioning is to open the bag up when you get out of it in the morning and let it air out during the day.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:19:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By lethal_addiction:
20 degrees isn't that cold, but it is a little cold.

IF you have the money I would suggest getting a -20 degree synthetic bag. You can probably get a decent one for $275 but I army it's been awhile since I've bought a new one. A -20 will keep you comfortable. A 32 degree bag will NOT. Understand that the way they rate sleeping bags. Whatever the bag is rated for, that is the minimum temp that an average person can survive through the night and not die of hypothermia. You would be up all night shivering your balls off in 32 degrees with your 32 degree bag. Not recommended to go lower.

And don't listen to that myth that sleeping without long johns is better than with. That a load of crap. Get a pair of nice "expedition weight" Merino wool (poor bunnies ) uppers and lowers.

Put the socks you wore for the day in your bag when you sleep and they will dry out. Put all your water in the bag (keep in container) otherwise it may freeze. Also any lighters you have must go in the bag as well... resist the urge to play with them before you sleep.

Ground pad is very important.
View Quote


Exactly!
Get a good set of "long johns or equiv" you will sleep great!
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:20:46 PM EST
USGI MSS
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM EST
I used one of those Army surplus bags in the teens in the Davis mountains. Morning neared and the temp rose into the 20s. I about died from over heating, those bags are that good.
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