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Posted: 7/30/2014 2:02:37 PM EDT
Cooked up a excellent all grain cream ale for the summer. Wife loves it, I love it everyone who tries it, loves it. I'll be making it again and again.

It used a Kolsch yeast that was very cloudy and the local brew shop recommended cold crashing when I was picking up ingredients. Fermented at my basement temp of 65º with a damp towel wrapped around it. Moved it to a secondary and It just so happened that cold crashing coincided with a vacation and some busy times for me, so it sat in the fridge at 38º for four weeks. Came out very clean and a nice deep amber color.

Now I know the difference between and ale and a lager, that not was this is..But the term lagering refers to cold storage of beer which is essentially what I did.

Link Posted: 7/30/2014 2:53:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2014 3:25:56 PM EDT
sure, thats "lagering" --But I'm not sure how one could make an amber "cream ale" unless the extract was super old and oxidized
Link Posted: 7/30/2014 4:19:19 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skin290:
sure, thats "lagering" --But I'm not sure how one could make an amber "cream ale" unless the extract was super old and oxidized
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All grain
Link Posted: 8/8/2014 1:36:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/8/2014 1:38:15 PM EDT by 338winmag]
The word lager means to store. What you really did was cold crash it. Lagering is usually done in the secondary.

ETA: I see you did it in the secondary. So how much crud ended up on the bottom of the vessel?
Link Posted: 8/9/2014 11:58:19 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 338winmag:
The word lager means to store. What you really did was cold crash it. Lagering is usually done in the secondary.

ETA: I see you did it in the secondary. So how much crud ended up on the bottom of the vessel?
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It wasn't anything like the yeast and garbage from the primary. Maybe a 1/8" or less, kind of like at the bottom of a mug of hot chocolate but the color very light, almost off white.
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