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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/20/2005 4:49:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 4:50:34 PM EDT by TheRedGoat]
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:52:41 PM EDT
Call Fidelity or Vanguard. They'll get you straightened out. Good move.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:53:21 PM EDT
Check out this thread I started today, it may help you out.


What's the best way to set this up? Can I do it myself? Do I need to go to a financial planing company?


Be very careful with going with a large finacial advisement company, and do your homework before hand. I learned the hard way!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:55:16 PM EDT
I use Vanguard. Just go to www.vanguard.com, print the form, sign it, and send it in. It is completely internet-based from then on, and the costs are very low.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:58:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 5:00:00 PM EDT by roboman]
It's very easy. I went with Fidelity and signed up for a Roth. You fill out some forms (online even if you want, which is what I did) and can either mail in a check or have money wired from your bank into your account.

I had $3,500 wired in and invested in a widely-diversified Vanguard mutual fund. Fidelity charged me a $75 fee to buy as many shares as I could afford. They are synced with Quicken if you use that, and have online account accessibility.

Very easy to do. If I managed to do it, you definitely can without issue.

If you don't want to put in the minimum deposit of $2,000 (I think it's around there) they have the option of setting up a Roth that automatically takes X amount of dollars (lowest is $200) out of your checking or savings each month. With this kind of setup (with Fidelity as least) you have to fill out paperwork and mail it in, no online signup.

Feel free to IM or email me if you have any questions.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:58:40 PM EDT
I would recommend calling. You are bound to have some questions and they will give you the answers, how to, and send the forms to you.

Vanguard and Fidelity both have fine reputations.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:01:35 PM EDT
I set mine up with the Credit Union of New Jersey. It has a killer return compaired to my company's mutual fund.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:02:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:
It's very easy. I went with Fidelity and signed up for a Roth. You fill out some forms (online even if you want, which is what I did) and can either mail in a check or have money wired from your bank into your account.

I had $3,500 wired in and invested in a widely-diversified Vanguard mutual fund. Fidelity charged me a $75 fee to buy as many shares as I could afford. They are synced with Quicken if you use that, and have online account accessibility.

Very easy to do. If I managed to do it, you definitely can without issue.

If you don't want to put in the minimum deposit of $2,000 (I think it's around there) they have the option of setting up a Roth that automatically takes X amount of dollars (lowest is $200) out of your checking or savings each month. With this kind of setup (with Fidelity as least) you have to fill out paperwork and mail it in, no online signup.

Feel free to IM or email me if you have any questions.



The minimum depends on the investment.
Some are 1,000. Some are 1,500. Some ar emore. Just depends what you want.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:03:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:06:10 PM EDT
Vanguard is the way to go, though Fidelity and T. Rowe Price are great as well. T. Rowe allows you to start up with NO initial investment, and you can split your monthly investment into two times a month to take advantage of dollar cost averaging. Check out their Capital Appreciation fund - very nice returns.

You can put in a max of $4000 a year right now on a Roth, soon to go up next year I think to $4500.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:12:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:12:15 PM EDT
Yeah, setting up with a credit card company, insurance companies, fly by nights is about like walking through a dark alley naked. Insurance vehicles suck, and generate large commisions for the seller.

If you are really not sure where to put it, place it in an indexed fund such as an S&P 500 fund. Well diversified and have generally a good rate of growth. IOWs reasonably safe with a decent return. While it's growing you can look into other options.

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