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Posted: 4/26/2015 6:16:04 PM EST
These are pictures from various stages of Finnish Mosin and Suomi production. Notice the Milwaukee mills.

Pics were said to come from here: http://sa-kuva.fi/neo?tem=webneoeng
I don't read Finnish, so you're on your own to sort through the pics. Lots of cool stuff!

VKT Factory.



Tikkakoski Building

































Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:18:25 PM EST
Great pics, OP. thanks!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:18:34 PM EST
Some cool machines in those pics along with the rifles.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:20:18 PM EST
Really interesting pics thanks for sharing


.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:22:44 PM EST
Very cool! Thanks for sharing, OP!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:23:05 PM EST
Awesome!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:23:59 PM EST
Old school iron turning out parts. No safety glasses, or ear plugs. No yellow paint lines on the floor. Everybody is wearing dress clothes or coveralls. It's good to see pictures of when real shit got done with out computers, or stupid safety notices plastered on every surface. Gotta love it.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:24:28 PM EST
Neat!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:26:22 PM EST
What are they doing in the last picture?
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:26:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 6:27:35 PM EST by Chapman]
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:27:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Got_Nukes:
What are they doing in the last picture?
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Appear to be checking accuracy.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:29:38 PM EST
Sweet
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:30:49 PM EST

I will ask my Finnish friend who is a member here to translate for us.

Well as soon as he sobers up.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:32:02 PM EST
Neat. Old school Finns getting things done.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:34:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 6:35:25 PM EST by Chapman]
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:34:15 PM EST
Outstanding post, great pics...Thanks for Posting!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:35:09 PM EST
Some Stanley planes in there, too.

Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:36:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Udder_Catastrophe:
Old school iron turning out parts. No safety glasses, or ear plugs. No yellow paint lines on the floor. Everybody is wearing dress clothes or coveralls. It's good to see pictures of when real shit got done with out computers, or stupid safety notices plastered on every surface. Gotta love it.
View Quote

Derp
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:39:18 PM EST
The camouflage paint job on the building, and the shrubs up on the roof are cool!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:44:27 PM EST
Mill and lathe porn

combined with gun porn, the best kind
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:47:08 PM EST
The day will come when many here will regret having a good Mosin and a good Mauser. Grab that piece of history while you can!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:49:25 PM EST
Now that is pretty damn cool!!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:49:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chapman:


Meh, I like going home with my eyeballs and appendages intact. Safety glasses have saved my vision twice. Long sleeves do NOT belong in a machine shop, especially one with manual machines working very close to spindles, for very obvious reasons. Also, with those damn cursed computers, we could crank out 5 times their production with a crew half the size and half the skill, and still make more accurate products, at a fraction of the cost.

I admire their trade, and think it is becoming a lost art, but I still prefer how we do it today.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By Udder_Catastrophe:
Old school iron turning out parts. No safety glasses, or ear plugs. No yellow paint lines on the floor. Everybody is wearing dress clothes or coveralls. It's good to see pictures of when real shit got done with out computers, or stupid safety notices plastered on every surface. Gotta love it.


Meh, I like going home with my eyeballs and appendages intact. Safety glasses have saved my vision twice. Long sleeves do NOT belong in a machine shop, especially one with manual machines working very close to spindles, for very obvious reasons. Also, with those damn cursed computers, we could crank out 5 times their production with a crew half the size and half the skill, and still make more accurate products, at a fraction of the cost.

I admire their trade, and think it is becoming a lost art, but I still prefer how we do it today.

I feel the same.

It was a moment of respect for the old way of doing things. The new way is much better, and much safer. But I can't help but sit in awe of how things used to be. I'm not saying I'd machine stuff without safety gear, or wear long sleeves next to a turning spindle... but you gotta respect the ways of those old guys. They got shit done.

I've had my vision saved by safety glasses on a few occasions. Surface grinder wheels are unpredictable when they blow up...
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:52:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 6:53:12 PM EST by SuperMegaBroBro]
Very neat!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 6:52:59 PM EST
Awesome

I have a few Finnish Mosins and its very cool to see where they came from and the guys that may have built my rifles.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:02:40 PM EST
I'd like to thank the fine workers in those pictures for building the M39 Finn Mosins that are now mine. I enjoy them greatly as I blast up clay pigeons set on the berms. Fine rifles, and many are pre 1898. 117 year old action, and i can take out soda cans at 100 yards.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:04:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 7:05:00 PM EST by raven]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chapman:


The contrast between this and a modern CNC shop is astounding. Though we share a profession, we'd all be lost in each others shops.

The way they did things before CNC came along is pretty interesting to me.

The lack of eye-pro, and machinists wearing sweater-vests is giving me a twitch.
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Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
Some cool machines in those pics along with the rifles.


The contrast between this and a modern CNC shop is astounding. Though we share a profession, we'd all be lost in each others shops.

The way they did things before CNC came along is pretty interesting to me.

The lack of eye-pro, and machinists wearing sweater-vests is giving me a twitch.

Yeah, Russians have a pretty casual relationship with safety. EDITED, those are Finns.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:06:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Deadeye_Jack:
The day will come when many here will regret having a good Mosin and a good Mauser. Grab that piece of history while you can!
View Quote


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:08:46 PM EST
Very cool OP. Thanks for posting.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:10:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AbleArcher:


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AbleArcher:
Originally Posted By Deadeye_Jack:
The day will come when many here will regret having a good Mosin and a good Mauser. Grab that piece of history while you can!


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?



Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:12:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AbleArcher:


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AbleArcher:
Originally Posted By Deadeye_Jack:
The day will come when many here will regret having a good Mosin and a good Mauser. Grab that piece of history while you can!


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?


They'll regret not having a Mosin while they were still inexpensive. 40 years ago, guys picked a K98 out of a barrel at the hardware store, and turned it into a budget sporter rifle. Today, that rifle might have been worth $1000. Machining and labor are expensive. We will never cost effectively duplicate the wartime rifles that you can now buy for a few hundred bucks.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:13:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 7:14:32 PM EST by BlackOps_1]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:

Yeah, Russians have a pretty casual relationship with safety. EDITED, those are Finns.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
Some cool machines in those pics along with the rifles.


The contrast between this and a modern CNC shop is astounding. Though we share a profession, we'd all be lost in each others shops.

The way they did things before CNC came along is pretty interesting to me.

The lack of eye-pro, and machinists wearing sweater-vests is giving me a twitch.

Yeah, Russians have a pretty casual relationship with safety. EDITED, those are Finns.


We also have to keep in mind that was around 70 plus years ago, my mosin was made in 1944 We have come a long way since then on workplace safety and all that crap. And I'm not a machinist, but I really doubt they're equipment operated at the kind of spindle speeds you guys have today that work in that profession today. Am I right?
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:18:24 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NukeFromOrbit:
Great pics, OP. thanks!
View Quote

Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:18:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 7:31:27 PM EST by outofbattery]
My Finnish rearsenalled Mosin still has pine needles stuck in it. I don't want to clean the history away





Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:18:43 PM EST
Quantity has a quality all its own..
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:18:44 PM EST
that one guy looks like Leonardo



Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:25:02 PM EST
I learned on manual machines with no electronics. When I took my current job all the machines had Accurite DROs, they bought me two CNC mills and sent me to the factory schools to learn how to use them. Now I come home to my old manual machines and wish I was back at work.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:28:09 PM EST
Very neat pictures, THANKS for sharing, OP!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:31:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/26/2015 7:37:19 PM EST by MonkTx]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kbear:
Quantity has a quality all its own..
View Quote


That is so deep and really has nothing to do with Finnish rifles.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:38:14 PM EST
Pretty cool stuff.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:42:37 PM EST
Great pics...see what can be done with a horizontal mill?

One of these days I'll pick one up...

It's good to see old school at work.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:44:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By czechsix:
Great pics...see what can be done with a horizontal mill?

One of these days I'll pick one up...

It's good to see old school at work.
View Quote


next you will be wanting a shaper to cut keyways.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:49:17 PM EST
Cool pics thanks for posting. Neat to see where my M31 came from.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:51:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brian252:


They'll regret not having a Mosin while they were still inexpensive. 40 years ago, guys picked a K98 out of a barrel at the hardware store, and turned it into a budget sporter rifle. Today, that rifle might have been worth $1000. Machining and labor are expensive. We will never cost effectively duplicate the wartime rifles that you can now buy for a few hundred bucks.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brian252:
Originally Posted By AbleArcher:
Originally Posted By Deadeye_Jack:
The day will come when many here will regret having a good Mosin and a good Mauser. Grab that piece of history while you can!


Why would they regret having a good Mosin or Mauser?


They'll regret not having a Mosin while they were still inexpensive. 40 years ago, guys picked a K98 out of a barrel at the hardware store, and turned it into a budget sporter rifle. Today, that rifle might have been worth $1000. Machining and labor are expensive. We will never cost effectively duplicate the wartime rifles that you can now buy for a few hundred bucks.


I bought a pile of M44's for $69 each with my C&R. To have mil-surp ammo is icing on the cake!


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:52:51 PM EST
Time to post this

Link Posted: 4/26/2015 7:53:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:


next you will be wanting a shaper to cut keyways.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
Originally Posted By czechsix:
Great pics...see what can be done with a horizontal mill?

One of these days I'll pick one up...

It's good to see old school at work.


next you will be wanting a shaper to cut keyways.
But of course!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:01:32 PM EST
nice
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:21:01 PM EST
Very cool thread. Thanks OP!
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:25:16 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chapman:


Meh, I like going home with my eyeballs and appendages intact. Safety glasses have saved my vision twice. Long sleeves do NOT belong in a machine shop, especially one with manual machines working very close to spindles, for very obvious reasons. Also, with those damn cursed computers, we could crank out 5 times their production with a crew half the size and half the skill, and still make more accurate products, at a fraction of the cost.

I admire their trade, and think it is becoming a lost art, but I still prefer how we do it today.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By Udder_Catastrophe:
Old school iron turning out parts. No safety glasses, or ear plugs. No yellow paint lines on the floor. Everybody is wearing dress clothes or coveralls. It's good to see pictures of when real shit got done with out computers, or stupid safety notices plastered on every surface. Gotta love it.


Meh, I like going home with my eyeballs and appendages intact. Safety glasses have saved my vision twice. Long sleeves do NOT belong in a machine shop, especially one with manual machines working very close to spindles, for very obvious reasons. Also, with those damn cursed computers, we could crank out 5 times their production with a crew half the size and half the skill, and still make more accurate products, at a fraction of the cost.

I admire their trade, and think it is becoming a lost art, but I still prefer how we do it today.



of course you do.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:25:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
Some cool machines in those pics along with the rifles.
View Quote


Lots of Milwaukee horizontal mills in one of the first few pics.
I'd love to take a tour of that place if it still existed.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:26:58 PM EST
Most of the younger generations will never appreciate starting with plate steel and rod stock and building a working machine with old school tools and methods. I greatly admire my grandfather who worked days in the Ford plant in East Chicago and ran a garage at night, hand fitting each rod and main bearing as well as the piston rings when he rebuilt Model T engines. CNC stuff is great, but the art there is in the programming, pretty much any intelligent person can learn to do that. Not everyone has the skill to be an old school machinist or mechanic. As I sit here with 6 stitches in my finger that I got at work last Monday, I will always hate safety nazis .

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Udder_Catastrophe:
Old school iron turning out parts. No safety glasses, or ear plugs. No yellow paint lines on the floor. Everybody is wearing dress clothes or coveralls. It's good to see pictures of when real shit got done with out computers, or stupid safety notices plastered on every surface. Gotta love it.
View Quote


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