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4/22/2019 5:32:20 PM
Posted: 8/18/2006 8:28:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2006 5:25:52 PM EDT by prk]
How big a boat would be the low end?

Also what is the difference between a regular GPS and marine GPS other than I understand that the marine units are usually mounted to the boat and may have a larger display, have some waterproofing, etc.

Any other equipment recommendations? Having trouble finding a list on the USCG site.

Not PLANNING to go beyond sight of the shore.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 8:32:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2006 9:04:55 PM EDT by double_wielder]
25 ft deep hull, 2 engines/drives, 2 radios and 2 nav aids.

ETA pic 2 outboards would be nice
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 8:38:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By double_wielder:
25 ft deep hull, 2 engines/drives, 2 radios and 2 nav aids.


That's about right. Actually, particularly if you're just going to stay on the coast, quality is way more important than size, or at least length.

Better a 19' Whaler than a 25' bayliner.

Fishing boat?
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 8:43:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2006 8:43:17 PM EDT by eesmith4]
remember, 2 is 1, 1 is none.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 8:56:09 PM EDT
Avoid a cutout transom. If your engines crap (bad fuel or whatever), following seas can flood the boat and then you swim.

Many marine GPSs can utilize/interface with electronic nautical charts. That's what the big displays are for.

My 2 cents.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:06:18 PM EDT

Not PLANNING to go beyond sight of the shore.

LOL...Yes you will.


Depends on where you are to an extent.

I have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:06:28 PM EDT
Thanks for the advice so far. The boat in question is an aluminum bass boat under 20 feet, trying to remember the make & model. 50 Merc & some 9.9 kicker.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:08:18 PM EDT
Please take me fishing.


Originally Posted By madmedic:

Not PLANNING to go beyond sight of the shore.

LOL...Yes you will.


Depends on where you are to an extent.

I have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder.
img.photobucket.com/albums/v508/madmedic/407092625_l.jpg
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:08:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By prk:
Thanks for the advice so far. The boat in question is an aluminum bass boat under 20 feet, trying to remember the make & model. 50 Merc & some 9.9 kicker.


Definitely NOT. Sounds like a freshwater boat to me.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:11:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By double_wielder:
Please take me fishing.


Originally Posted By madmedic:

Not PLANNING to go beyond sight of the shore.

LOL...Yes you will.


Depends on where you are to an extent.

I have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder.
img.photobucket.com/albums/v508/madmedic/407092625_l.jpg


Come to Florida
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 9:14:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By prk:
Thanks for the advice so far. The boat in question is an aluminum bass boat under 20 feet, trying to remember the make & model. 50 Merc & some 9.9 kicker.


On a calm day (no more than 1 to 2') you can CERTAINLY take a small boat in the ocean.
People do it all the time around here.
Wouldnt go beyond sight of land with it though.

Where are you?...are the seas agreeable?...look to see what other people are taking offshore in your area.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:04:49 PM EDT
Depends on what kinds of seas you have on a normal day. A bass boat seems an invitation to disaster. And yet on fishing shows you see guys off the Gulf Coast and Florida Keys in similar boats.

And I've been in some moderate seas in a motor whaleboat, without feeling overly concerned. But I knew we had a cruiser around some place if we needed help. We couldn't see it most of the time until we crested a swell or wave.

An off-shore boat that has some height available would be the minimum, 3-4 foot swells in a bass boat and you won't be able to see hardly anything. Those of you who have been in SoCal know how many people get lost trying to get from Catalina Island back to the mainland when the weather fails either fog or Santa Ana winds. And that's only 26 miles, and you can see both the island and the mainland most of the time.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:05:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2006 11:06:01 PM EDT by ShortyAK]
PRK, are you in SoCal?

A boat that size would be ok for things like Long Beach Harbor, Marina Del Rey and maybe a trip out to the Huntington Beach flats on a fairly calm day. That said, we used to go to Catalina in boats that size. Of course I was young and stupid then. All we had was one outboard and a case of beer.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:05:42 PM EDT
" have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder."

Sorry... you need TWO or even three outboards, not one Yamaha. Yes, I have seen two engines fail, so I am not about to go offshore with only one.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:08:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
" have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder."

Sorry... you need TWO or even three outboards, not one Yamaha. Yes, I have seen two engines fail, so I am not about to go offshore with only one.


In my experience, the Atlantic is a lot more forgiving than the Pacific. At least it sure feels that way.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:17:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
" have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder."

Sorry... you need TWO or even three outboards, not one Yamaha. Yes, I have seen two engines fail, so I am not about to go offshore with only one.


Been doing it for many years...as have hundreds of thousands of others.

Id love to have TWO of the same motor that I have, counter rotated...but I dont...so be it.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:20:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ORinTX:

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
" have no problem going 25/30 miles out in my 22' Chris Craft.
250hp Yamaha, Lowrance Globalmap 3500c GPS chartplotter, ICOM marine VHF, Hummingbird 3-D depth/fish finder."

Sorry... you need TWO or even three outboards, not one Yamaha. Yes, I have seen two engines fail, so I am not about to go offshore with only one.


In my experience, the Atlantic is a lot more forgiving than the Pacific. At least it sure feels that way.


Yes, it is...which is why I said "depends where you are".
I wouldnt take my setup out in parts of the Pacific...or in parts of the North East.
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:50:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2006 12:03:20 AM EDT by gaspain]
Bass boat on the open sea. LOL, I hope you have the Coast Gaurd on speed dial on your radio.

The smallest I would use is a 39' dual diesel, I dont mess around. Even then you would have an interesting time.

I have seen 20' trawlers out there 20nm out, but damn they were getting rocked. I wouldnt want to be on one, its maniacal.

Oh, if you are planning on staying within 5nm of shore...then a 20' (sea going vessel, not a bass boat)might work ok. But if you are an inexperianced mariner you could get yourself in some shit that you cant get out of(inclement weather).

Remember, point the bow towards the wave, no booze - save that for the shore, and GPS doesnt always work!
Link Posted: 8/18/2006 11:55:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By prk:
Thanks for the advice so far. The boat in question is an aluminum bass boat under 20 feet, trying to remember the make & model. 50 Merc & some 9.9 kicker.


That's prety much a boat for the bay, and even then on a calm day only. Otherwise, you'll get swamped.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 12:26:23 AM EDT
Mako or Grady wet or hard to beat.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 12:26:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2006 12:49:35 AM EDT by jcncc]
Mako or Grady wet or hard to beat. Sorry double tap.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 12:46:53 AM EDT


Who needs engines!
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 1:19:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 1:32:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By osprey21:
img.photobucket.com/albums/v439/osprey21/InDebt.jpg


nice
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 1:37:48 AM EDT
This it the smallest boat I'd go offshore in....I've seen 25+ foot sea's off Hatteras...in a tug this size... towing a dead 600 foot ship. I dunno about you, but I'd get a bigger boat....
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 2:09:06 AM EDT
1) How big a boat would be the low end?

depends where your fishing, when we were kids we would go 25 miles off shore with a 16 Whaler Montauk,, when I could afford it, I moved to a 23ft'er,, now a days,, I want something with air-conditioning, soft chairs, and a Sat-TV... the bones are a getting old..


2)Also what is the difference between a regular GPS and marine GPS other than I understand that the marine units are usually mounted to the boat and may have a larger display, have some waterproofing, etc.

Marine gps usually have built in functions,, IE Tide Tables, USCG nav markers, Local marianas... Where-as the non-marine will have road & restaurants & Bars...

The key to GPS on a boat is the frequency of the plot and accuracy of plot.

If your machine plots the course every 15 seconds,, then you have moved 15 sec worth of distance,, at speed that can be several hundred yards..

The best GPS is only accurate to 3-5 meters,, that's enough to miss or hit a hole bunch of reef or coral head,, in error..

Off shore, in the Florida Straights,, the gps will get you home on the shortest course.. because of the east current in the straights you can troll west for a couple hours and actually be east of your start point,, The gps also keeps you out of Cuba' waters,, they use gun ships..

GPS is a tool and is only as good as the operator...

3)Any other equipment recommendations? Having trouble finding a list on the USCG site.

I very very very strongly suggest you take a USCG boating course, learn marine navigation,, and go out with knowledgeable buddies for a while.. The USCG picks up floaters every month,, between the cuban margaritas & dummies,, they tag-n-bag 15-20 every year... Most with-in sight of shore...

NEVER go off shore at all with a boat that does not have enough gunwale,, ie a bass boat. the common 3 ft roller will swamp a bass boat in seconds...

Now, having said that,, I run a Maverick 16ft flats skiff, with a 70hp,, hole package runs maybe 1000 lbs,, draws 8" of water, with has a 8" gunwale,, no gps or no depth finder.. Why,, I fish the flats,, some times 25-35 miles from home,, getting there and back I rely on local knowledge, some of the cuts & channels I run are only 4-5 ft wide,, if you don't know where they are a gps will not find them..

As an aside,, The USCG has the responsibility to chart all navigatable channels, harbors, & rivers.. Conversely,, they are not looking at the rest of the water ways and at times will use maps with soundings that are very old.. Always check the chart you use for their age..

Good Luck

Link Posted: 8/19/2006 2:25:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2006 2:29:23 AM EDT by Q3131A]

Originally Posted By prk:
How big a boat would be the low end?

I go 15 miles offshore in my 17' Whaler Montauk. 50 miles in a 25' Contender.


Also what is the difference between a regular GPS and marine GPS other than I understand that the marine units are usually mounted to the boat and may have a larger display, have some waterproofing, etc.

Good marine GPSs are fully waterproof and can stand up to salt water. They are programmed to accept some type of data input to load charts, bottom contours and depths. I recommend Garmin for a budget GPS. A color GPS is worth the extra money. If you have alot of $$$ the RayMarine C series is not only a great GPS, but also a depth sounder and radar station.


Any other equipment recommendations? Having trouble finding a list on the USCG site.

You will need a USCG approved life vest for each person, 3 current flairs, a throwable flotation device, a whistle, a bailer and a fire extinguisher. A marine radio is also important. Don't forget a compass.

If you are going to fish, I suggest a depth sounder/fish finder, cooler to hold drinks and extra food/water. Also, a boat with lots of storage is very useful.


Not PLANNING to go beyond sight of the shore.

Not leaving sight of shore is "inshore" not "offshore". There are lots of boats that will go inshore. Look at flats boats, bay boats, pontoon boats, hurricane deck boats.


What do you want to do with the boat? Fish? Party? Take the wife/kids out?

IM me and we can discuss. I own three boats and live on the water.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 2:27:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcncc:
Mako or Grady wet or hard to beat. Sorry double tap.


New Makos are not what they once were. They are owned by BPS now.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 3:56:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2006 3:57:05 AM EDT by dneal]
Ive got two 17 ft. Boston Whalers,ones a Montauk and the others a Newport and go all over Tampa Bay . Down in the Fl. Keys we stay out about 8 to 12 miles off shore

1997 Montauk 2000 100hp. yamah four stroke

1977 Newport 1997 90hp johnson two stroke
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 4:01:16 AM EDT
Shoot, I'll cross oceans anytime on a good 30 footer.
A sailboat, of course. I crewed on a 33 foot wooden sloop in 1976 crossing the Atlantic, and I sailed solo from Panama to Hawaii to Guam on my own self-built 48 footer. In fact, I'll be brining it from San Diego to Panama to Florida this fall.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 5:09:46 AM EDT
The low freeboard on an aluminum lake boat, along with an open transom, is an excellent way to sink your boat in coastal waters. 2 good scoops of water in rapid succession would be almost impossible to recover from.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 5:09:53 AM EDT
I just downsized from a 24ft center console to a 20 ft Walk-around cuddy. I fish the Gulf of Mexico, famous for some really nasty weather that'll pop up on a calm day. I usually find all the fish I want within 20 miles.

Some suggestions for MANDATORY features.

Self bailing deck
High gunnels and bow
Twin bilge pumps, manual backup pump
Tool kit
Bimini. It gets damn hot out there.
Fill the freakin gas tank. Plan a 30% reserve. Don't trust the fuel gauge.
Two engines. Either proper twins or a primary/kicker setup. I have the latter. The USCG will not tow you in if the boat isn't sinking. The local tow service costs 450$ an hour within 15 miles. That's about a 5-hour tow. Marine tow insurance highly reccomended. Add an absolutely fanatical maintinence program.
Extra batteries. Set up to charge off the motor with a selector switch.
Two GPS's(run them together) and compass. Learn how to use the compass first.
Depth finder
Good paper charts (don't depend on the GPS charts)
VHF radio with a handheld backup and weather channel (Youll lose cell service about 5 miles out.)
Flares, flares, smokepots and flares. Waterproof flashlights, distress flag
Two good anchors with sufficient rode and chain. Sea anchor as well.
Life preservers. Keep extras. NOT the 4$ wal-Mart orange type, but good commercial offshore vests. They run about 40$ each. Wear the damn things when moving about the boat in rough conditions.
Rain gear
Fresh water. Lots of it. Good for a shower or after drifting for 10 hours waiting on the tow boat.
Life ring and throw line.


Now, about that bass boat. You CAN use it, there may be 4 or 5 days a year when it may even be safe. but it's like driving a car with bald tires. It's not a matter of IF you get in trouble but when.

Every offshore fisherman here has had to rescue some schmuck that either didn't prepare of just pushed his luck. Wanna see someone pissed off? Ask some other fisherman for his spare gas 23 miles out so you can make it back to port. I have a hundred stories like that. Maybe one trip out of five involves helping another boater in distress.

(If the jackass hadn't had his famly along I would have left him out there)

Lastly, make friends with other boaters and go together.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 5:20:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By osprey21:


Did you get a new one? I don't remember the Verados the last time you posted a pic of your boat.
I still want that SeaVee pretty bad. I have to stay under 30' for my marina lift, so all the 31's are out.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 5:31:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By prk:
Thanks for the advice so far. The boat in question is an aluminum bass boat under 20 feet, trying to remember the make & model. 50 Merc & some 9.9 kicker.


Within sight of the shore, you'll be fine in that. It just might be a bumpy ride home. Watch the weather and all will be good.

Now, if you are thinking about stepping up a few sizes look into the Parker hulls. They are very well built. Stay away from Boston Whalers, unless they are older than 1995. Ever since they were bought out their quality has gone to shit. They don't use half the glass they used to and they have several problems with transoms separating.

And as always, this is just from my experience, so YMMV.
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 5:59:20 AM EDT
You will want more than 1 engine.

My dad had a mate that had a nice boat that they went deep sea fishing in.

One time, the guy was fishing by himself off the coast and his engine failed. He rowed back in....
Link Posted: 8/19/2006 7:15:28 AM EDT

never had anything but whalers
they are the best, a little pricey, but resale is excellent.
best value is a used whaler'
To save $$$ id look for older hulls with new engines

Link Posted: 8/25/2006 7:40:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2006 8:08:01 PM EDT by prk]
Everyone -- thanks for sall the advice. I'm going to turn down this chance. The guy with the boat doesn't have enough safety gear, and I need to see the boat again and check out the new 2nd motor on the lake. For instance, last time on the lake there was only one short paddle that I think he borrowed from his small inflatable.

eesmith's "two is one and one is none" reminder is definitely fitting here..



Sorry for responding late - i had tried to post a reply earlier, but must have hit the wrong button.

I believe the boat is a Sylvan Sea Monster 17' or 19' and from pictures of others, I think it does have the low-cut transom.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 7:45:49 PM EDT
16ft canoe, Youll only need one paddle, dont let em tell you otherwise!
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 8:00:14 PM EDT
10/12 foot kayak. Saw a lot in the kelp beds off the Central California coast this week. I spect that's about as small as you want in a boat.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 8:08:22 PM EDT
Get a Gheenoe.

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