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Posted: 10/25/2013 8:12:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:16:23 PM EST
I've got a massive erection right now
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:18:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sloppyjoe:
I've got a massive erection right now
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Not me... but i do need a wet nap to clean up the mess. That was about 2.5 minutes more than I could handle.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:20:50 PM EST
I also saw a p38 in the background that was rolling out.

To much awesomeness
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:21:31 PM EST
It's cool that the Warthog is a descendant of the Thunderbolt.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:23:56 PM EST
My favorite fighter of the war. That plane just blew shit in half.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:24:07 PM EST
My second favorite Allied aircraft, behind the P-38.

Ive always loved the silver scheme with the black and white nose checkering.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:24:47 PM EST
Five.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:25:08 PM EST
They made those aircraft in Evansville, IN.

When I was a kid we used to fly model airplanes on the tarmac in front of the old plant. It's all long gone now.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:25:22 PM EST
SWEET!
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:27:19 PM EST
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:28:43 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 50cal:
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.
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The rare of the rare.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 9:16:15 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 50cal:
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.
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Is it Hun Hunter? I have a picture of that bird around here somewhere. Didn't know it was an N though.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 9:42:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
http://youtu.be/KVAiGYBrajs
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Quote just so I can view it on mobile.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:04:43 PM EST
Beast mode for WWII fighters
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:08:12 PM EST
No no no!


It's too sexy! It's too sexy!

Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:11:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gadawg556:


Is it Hun Hunter? I have a picture of that bird around here somewhere. Didn't know it was an N though.
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Originally Posted By gadawg556:
Originally Posted By 50cal:
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.


Is it Hun Hunter? I have a picture of that bird around here somewhere. Didn't know it was an N though.


Not sure. They had 2. Haven't been in a while. Need to make a trip. They have a P-51D, Ain't Misbehavin'
It was just here at the Knoxville airport a few weeks ago.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:21:16 PM EST
Giggity!

A minor confession though, my favorite WW2 fighter is the Corsair.

I'm curious, if limited to a single piston engine, what kind of fighter could we cook up with today's material and design technology?
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:25:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sabre_kc:


The rare of the rare.
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Originally Posted By sabre_kc:
Originally Posted By 50cal:
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.


The rare of the rare.


Wet Wing late war final version of the P-47 to give the range for over water flights to Japanese targets escorting the B-29s...

Chills just thinking of what EIGHT .50 cals would do to the typical Japanese aircraft of the period...
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:27:10 PM EST
Yamamoto took a nosedive into the jungle in New Guinea, courtesy of a G Model Lightning, flown by Lt. Rex Barber.



Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:35:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
They made those aircraft in Evansville, IN.

When I was a kid we used to fly model airplanes on the tarmac in front of the old plant. It's all long gone now.
View Quote

Yup...it's where I live. One of the few things to be proud of in this town. The turned the plant into a refrigerator factory after the war....and now it's pretty much empty.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:38:29 PM EST
A great documentary is "A Fighter Pilot's Story" It's the story of Captain Quentin C. Aanenson, a P-47 pilot.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 12:54:51 AM EST
Pistons rule !
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:15:26 AM EST
The P-47 is probably the most misunderstood fighter of WW2. Most people think of it as a sluggish gun-truck best suited for ground attack but the reality is far from that. The P-47 was actually one of the most acrobatic planes of the war. It's performance was superior or equal to the P-51 Mustang in every category except range. It's roll rate was superior to the P-51, at speed the FW-190, and comparable to the Spitfire. Despite common belief, the rate of climb after the introduction of the paddle bladed propellers were superior to the P-51, FW-190 and Spitfire. The only reason that the P-51 become the dominant fighter in the 8th Air Force was the fact that it's escort range without external fuel tanks was 475 miles which coincidentally was the max range for the P-47D with the largest external fuel tank that could be mounted.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:19:28 AM EST
Sexy bird!
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:33:26 AM EST
I'll be in my bunk...
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:37:21 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sixnine:
It's cool that the Warthog is a descendant of the Thunderbolt.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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A-10 Thunderbolt II.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:41:26 AM EST

Too much awesome right there.

I built the Top Flight model of the razorback back in my RC days.
Flaps, retracts. 63" wing span. Flew great.

Long ago I read a claim that the sound barrier was broken in one in a steep dive.
Don't know the truth of that.

Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:52:30 AM EST
My stepdad flew those out of England in WWII. He flew 27 missions during the D-Day festivities.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:00:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dzapper:
The P-47 is probably the most misunderstood fighter of WW2. Most people think of it as a sluggish gun-truck best suited for ground attack but the reality is far from that. The P-47 was actually one of the most acrobatic planes of the war. It's performance was superior or equal to the P-51 Mustang in every category except range. It's roll rate was superior to the P-51, at speed the FW-190, and comparable to the Spitfire. Despite common belief, the rate of climb after the introduction of the paddle bladed propellers were superior to the P-51, FW-190 and Spitfire. The only reason that the P-51 become the dominant fighter in the 8th Air Force was the fact that it's escort range without external fuel tanks was 475 miles which coincidentally was the max range for the P-47D with the largest external fuel tank that could be mounted.
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Cool facts. P-47 was an awesome airplane.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:04:32 AM EST
So much mechanical beauty. My favorite single engine plane of all time.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:08:09 AM EST
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Originally Posted By mmf:
So much mechanical beauty. My favorite single engine plane of all time.
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What's your favorite twin, or multi-engine?
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:09:09 AM EST
My grandfather was a p-47 pilot during ww2. I love hearing his war stories, they had a lot of fun in that plane.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:11:40 AM EST
Blew my speakers out and woke my neighbors!

Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:15:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Black-Tiger:
Yamamoto took a nosedive into the jungle in New Guinea, courtesy of a G Model Lightning, flown by Lt. Rex Barber.

http://acesflyinghigh.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/richard_bong_in_cockpit-p-38.jpg

View Quote

Good picture of Dick Bong. Here's another:



Note the knife.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:42:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:48:30 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:49:09 AM EST
bad ass!
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:53:24 AM EST
My Uncle Earl (married to my Dad's sister) was a Jug pilot. Got into the war a bit after D Day, and flew into Berlin at the end.

He has this huge Nazi banner, a couple weapons (rifle and pistol) and a Stahlhelm he picked up at the end.

He and my aunt are still around, in their early 90s, living in Lufkin, TX.

LC
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:57:33 AM EST


Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:58:41 AM EST
Holy shit, is that cool!

I LOVE the noise those old warbirds make!
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:04:30 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
They made those aircraft in Evansville, IN.

When I was a kid we used to fly model airplanes on the tarmac in front of the old plant. It's all long gone now.
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They were talking about that on the LST when I toured it a number of times.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:10:13 AM EST
Amazing. My favorite WWII airplane.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:12:55 AM EST
Fap, fap, fap..
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:21:18 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dzapper:
The P-47 is probably the most misunderstood fighter of WW2. Most people think of it as a sluggish gun-truck best suited for ground attack but the reality is far from that. The P-47 was actually one of the most acrobatic planes of the war. It's performance was superior or equal to the P-51 Mustang in every category except range. It's roll rate was superior to the P-51, at speed the FW-190, and comparable to the Spitfire. Despite common belief, the rate of climb after the introduction of the paddle bladed propellers were superior to the P-51, FW-190 and Spitfire. The only reason that the P-51 become the dominant fighter in the 8th Air Force was the fact that it's escort range without external fuel tanks was 475 miles which coincidentally was the max range for the P-47D with the largest external fuel tank that could be mounted.
View Quote


P47 was also much better suited to ground attack due to 8 gun armament and ruggedness.


Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:24:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 3:29:45 AM EST by primuspilum]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Black-Tiger:
Yamamoto took a nosedive into the jungle in New Guinea, courtesy of a G Model Lightning, flown by Lt. Rex Barber.

http://acesflyinghigh.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/richard_bong_in_cockpit-p-38.jpg

View Quote



Isn't that Bong?

ETA: Beat. Nevermind.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:26:10 AM EST
Amazing. Awesome video.

One thing I wish they would do with every warbird that's taken down to pieces for restoration is to laser-scan every part and record the metallurgy as well. With that and the original blueprints, that would be what would be needed, centuries hence, for advanced CNC or even nanoforming equipment to create "new" ones, and ensure that Americans never forget the sound of a warbird in song.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:28:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dzapper:
The P-47 is probably the most misunderstood fighter of WW2. Most people think of it as a sluggish gun-truck best suited for ground attack but the reality is far from that. The P-47 was actually one of the most acrobatic planes of the war. It's performance was superior or equal to the P-51 Mustang in every category except range. It's roll rate was superior to the P-51, at speed the FW-190, and comparable to the Spitfire. Despite common belief, the rate of climb after the introduction of the paddle bladed propellers were superior to the P-51, FW-190 and Spitfire. The only reason that the P-51 become the dominant fighter in the 8th Air Force was the fact that it's escort range without external fuel tanks was 475 miles which coincidentally was the max range for the P-47D with the largest external fuel tank that could be mounted.
View Quote



Read "Goodbye Mickey Mouse". It's about a P47 Squadron that converted to P51's and most of the pilots are longing for their P47's back. (that's the backstory, if I recall, Mickey Mouse was the name of one of the P47's).

Kind of a potboiler book (by Len Dieghton) but a great read for the parts where they are flying escort.

Spoiler alert: Don't sleep with Rex's wife.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodbye,_Mickey_Mouse

Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:29:38 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gadawg556:


Is it Hun Hunter? I have a picture of that bird around here somewhere. Didn't know it was an N though.
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Originally Posted By gadawg556:
Originally Posted By 50cal:
A hangar in Sevierville, Tenn has an N model.


Is it Hun Hunter? I have a picture of that bird around here somewhere. Didn't know it was an N though.



I'm fairly sure the N only made it to the Pacific?

The then F-47s would have been sent to Korea and been quite useful had the Air Guard not divided the squadrons between the west getting Mustangs and east coast Jugs.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:31:19 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:31:36 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By littlebeavis:
A great documentary is "A Fighter Pilot's Story" It's the story of Captain Quentin C. Aanenson, a P-47 pilot.
View Quote


If that's the PBS doc my great uncle is mentioned in it. He flew the Jug in the same unit as the guy the doc was about.
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