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Posted: 6/16/2009 10:00:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2009 6:56:53 AM EST by E-95]
STS-127 Mission Page

Mission: STS-127
Orbiter: Endeavour
Primary Payload: Kibo Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility, Kibo Japanese Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section
Launch Date: July 11
Launch Time: 7:39 p.m. EDT
Launch Pad: 39A
Mission Duration: 16 days
Inclination/Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

STS-127 Mission Overview
The 16-day mission will feature five spacewalks and complete construction of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. Astronauts will attach a platform to the outside of the Japanese module that will allow experiments to be exposed to space.

The STS-127 crew members are Commander Mark Polansky, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Dave Wolf, Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Tim Kopra and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette. Kopra will join the space station crew and replace Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata. Wakata will return to Earth on Endeavour to conclude a three-month stay at the station.



Official Countdown Clock

NASA TV Online

Mission schedule updated above.

E-95
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:03:14 AM EST
Sweet!
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:04:53 AM EST
I plan to be up for this one. The last pre-dawn launch I saw from here was spectacular. The sun illuminated the exhaust like a giant fluorescent orange tube of cotton.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:28:46 AM EST
Darn, I thought it was going up at 5:40 Central instead of Eastern. I'm not waking up extra early for that.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 11:07:50 AM EST
I know, I'm still debating about live or DVR!

E-95
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 12:18:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 12:19:21 PM EST by E-95]
Four more built in holds in the countdown. Just under 12 and a half hours until liftoff:

T-6 hours and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts two hours.
  • Launch team verifies no violations of launch commit criteria before loading the external tank with propellants
  • Clear pad of all personnel
  • Chill-down of propellant transfer lines
  • Begin loading the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants
T-6 hours and counting
  • Finish filling the external tank with its flight load of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants
T-3 hours and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts two hours.
  • Perform inertial measurement unit preflight calibration
  • Align Merritt Island Launch Area (MILA) tracking antennas
  • Final Inspection Team proceeds to the launch pad to conduct a detailed analysis of the vehicle as the team walks up and down the entire launch tower
  • Closeout Crew proceeds to the launch pad to configure the crew module for countdown and launch and assist the astronauts with entry into the orbiter
T-3 hours and counting
  • Crew departs for the launch pad and, upon arriving at the pad, begins entry into the orbiter via the White Room
  • Complete close-out preparations in the launch pad's White Room
  • Check cockpit switch configurations
  • Astronauts perform air-to-ground voice checks with Launch Control (Kennedy Space Center) and Mission Control (Johnson Space Center)
  • Close the orbiter's crew hatch and check for leaks
  • Complete White Room close-out
  • Close-out crew retreats to fallback area
T-20 minutes and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts 10 minutes.
  • Shuttle Test Director conducts final launch team briefings
  • Complete inertial measurement unit preflight alignments
T-20 minutes and counting
  • Transition the orbiter's onboard computers to launch configuration
  • Start fuel cell thermal conditioning
  • Close orbiter cabin vent valves
  • Transition backup flight system to launch configuration
T-9 minutes and holding
This is the final built-in hold, and varies in length depending on the mission.
  • The Launch Director, Mission Management Team and Shuttle Test Director poll their teams for a go/no go for launch
T-9 minutes and counting
  • Start automatic ground launch sequencer
  • Retract orbiter access arm (T-7 minutes, 30 seconds)
  • Start auxiliary power units (T-5 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Arm solid rocket booster range safety safe and arm devices (T-5 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Start orbiter aerosurface profile test, followed by main engine gimbal profile test (T-3 minutes, 55 seconds)
  • Retract gaseous oxygen vent arm, or "beanie cap"
    (T-2 minutes, 55 seconds)
  • Crew members close and lock their visors
    (T-2 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Orbiter transfers from ground to internal power
    (T-50 seconds)
  • Ground launch sequencer is go for auto sequence start (T-31 seconds)
  • Activate launch pad sound suppression system
    (T-16 seconds)
  • Activate main engine hydrogen burnoff system
    (T-10 seconds)
  • Main engine start (T-6.6 seconds)
T-0
  • Solid rocket booster ignition and liftoff!
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 12:23:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By E-95:
Four more built in holds in the countdown. Just under 12 and a half hours until liftoff:

T-6 hours and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts two hours.
  • Launch team verifies no violations of launch commit criteria before loading the external tank with propellants
  • Clear pad of all personnel
  • Chill-down of propellant transfer lines
  • Begin loading the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants
T-6 hours and counting
  • Finish filling the external tank with its flight load of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants
T-3 hours and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts two hours.
  • Perform inertial measurement unit preflight calibration
  • Align Merritt Island Launch Area (MILA) tracking antennas
  • Final Inspection Team proceeds to the launch pad to conduct a detailed analysis of the vehicle as the team walks up and down the entire launch tower
  • Closeout Crew proceeds to the launch pad to configure the crew module for countdown and launch and assist the astronauts with entry into the orbiter
T-3 hours and counting
  • Crew departs for the launch pad and, upon arriving at the pad, begins entry into the orbiter via the White Room
  • Complete close-out preparations in the launch pad's White Room
  • Check cockpit switch configurations
  • Astronauts perform air-to-ground voice checks with Launch Control (Kennedy Space Center) and Mission Control (Johnson Space Center)
  • Close the orbiter's crew hatch and check for leaks
  • Complete White Room close-out
  • Close-out crew retreats to fallback area
T-20 minutes and holding
This built-in hold typically lasts 10 minutes.
  • Shuttle Test Director conducts final launch team briefings
  • Complete inertial measurement unit preflight alignments
T-20 minutes and counting
  • Transition the orbiter's onboard computers to launch configuration
  • Start fuel cell thermal conditioning
  • Close orbiter cabin vent valves
  • Transition backup flight system to launch configuration
T-9 minutes and holding
This is the final built-in hold, and varies in length depending on the mission.
  • The Launch Director, Mission Management Team and Shuttle Test Director poll their teams for a go/no go for launch
T-9 minutes and counting
  • Start automatic ground launch sequencer
  • Retract orbiter access arm (T-7 minutes, 30 seconds)
  • Start auxiliary power units (T-5 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Arm solid rocket booster range safety safe and arm devices (T-5 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Start orbiter aerosurface profile test, followed by main engine gimbal profile test (T-3 minutes, 55 seconds)
  • Retract gaseous oxygen vent arm, or "beanie cap"
    (T-2 minutes, 55 seconds)
  • Crew members close and lock their visors
    (T-2 minutes, 0 seconds)
  • Orbiter transfers from ground to internal power
    (T-50 seconds)
  • Ground launch sequencer is go for auto sequence start (T-31 seconds)
  • Activate launch pad sound suppression system
    (T-16 seconds)
  • Activate main engine hydrogen burnoff system
    (T-10 seconds)
  • Main engine start (T-6.6 seconds)
T-0
  • Solid rocket booster ignition and liftoff!


I feel like I'm back at Space Camp.

I might wake up to watch, depends on when I pass out.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 12:24:41 PM EST
If I wake up early enough, I will try to get a pic from Jax of the launch. Might be dark enough to get some nice flame out the back pics.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 12:26:35 PM EST
Is this the launch with the Ranstaad's Militia t-shirt on-board?
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:36:12 PM EST
Here's a bump for the night crew.

E-95
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:40:36 PM EST
Cool. I always like to watch them. One day I am going to catch one in person.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:01:27 PM EST
Watching live on the NASA channel.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:02:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By TheMechanic48:
Cool. I always like to watch them. One day I am going to catch one in person.

Well, you've only got 8 more shuttle launches to catch . . . including tomorrow's.

E-95
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:06:41 PM EST
I don't see any door gunner checks in the countdown list...
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:11:40 PM EST
The weather's cleared and they're fueling right now. We just had a bunch of storms go through with 10,000+ lightning strikes in a 4-hour period. There is a storm in the Jax area right now moving South that "might" fuck up the launch if it doesn't fall apart.

I'll probably be up, but if I'm not, it'll wake me up!!!

FYI.....it might be really spectacular with sunrise coming just after the launch. The Shuttle will probably pick up some reflection from the sun as it gets higher.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:11:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By TheMechanic48:
Cool. I always like to watch them. One day I am going to catch one in person.

Isn't this the last launch for the shuttles? The damn things are ancient...
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:12:58 PM EST
Boy they have been busy lately. Im guessing they are scrambling trying to finish everything

up before Obama puts NASA on mothballs.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:37:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 7:42:59 PM EST by E-95]
Originally Posted By Spenser_Burrows:

Originally Posted By TheMechanic48:
Cool. I always like to watch them. One day I am going to catch one in person.

Isn't this the last launch for the shuttles? The damn things are ancient...


NASA Consolidated Launch Schedule

17-Jun-09 Endeavour
07-Aug-09 Discovery
12-Nov-09 Atlantis
04-Feb-10 Endeavour
18-Mar-10 Discovery
14-May-10 Atlantis
29-Jul-10 Endeavour
16-Sep-10 Discovery

E-95
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 9:34:05 PM EST
scrubbed again for hydrogen leak
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:07:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 10:07:41 PM EST by MiG-21]
Next launch window July 11
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:09:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By Chokey:
scrubbed again for hydrogen leak


that couldve been a smidge bumpy
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 10:19:14 PM EST
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