Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
9/17/2020 5:59:48 PM
Posted: 6/22/2011 11:37:52 PM EDT
There is a BEAUTIFUL 1914 manufacture Colt 1911 at my LGS, for the price of $1275. I held it today, and have not wanted something so badly in a while.

I'm broke right now, but I do have a Kimber Warrior w/ 50 rounds through it that I do not particularly love. I have been looking for an opportunity to swap it perhaps for a Colt Series 70 or something. Maybe I would like this gun better?

Just daydreaming, what would you do?
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:42:43 PM EDT
I would probably do it.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:46:38 PM EDT
I'd probably do it, too.

It's worth what you're willing to pay...and what you're willing to pay is the trade-in price of your Kimber.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:48:37 PM EDT






 
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:49:58 PM EDT
I would have jumped on that in a heart beat. You can find Kimbers pretty easy. Find a GI 1911 that probably went to war.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:58:29 PM EDT
Dammit. The issue now is that i work 9-6 the next three days. Hope its still there on Monday.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:04:44 AM EDT
I would trade a Kimber for a baloney sandwich.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:07:13 AM EDT
DO they open at 0800? Call them and give CC number for a deposit or go do the trade real quick like. Call in sick from fucking work if thats what it takes.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:08:55 AM EDT
Before you leap at it - why are you buying it; for collecting, or for shooting?


If you're buying it for shooting, inspect it...check the firing pin hole in the breechface; dry fire the gun 4 or 5 times. If the firing pin sticks forward...walk away unless you plan on having a breech plug fitted. Check the slide stop notch. If it's been deformed...walk away, unless you plan on having it peened back into place and spot-hardened. Both of those were improvements made on the 1911A1 to prevent those issues.


If you're buying it for collecting, again inspect it before you buy it. Make sure it's original and correct. Check to see if it's been refinished. If it's been re-arsenaled, check the markings and verify that it's otherwise "correct" for a refinished/rebuilt military gun. There's a lot of documentation on the web and in books about this stuff; be prepared to read for a few months...

For the price they're asking for it, I'd be a little leery that it's not original.  Either that, or it is, and the seller doesn't know what they have, which perversely increases the chances of it being monkeyed with as they wouldn't know any better. The fact that you described it as "beautiful" indicate to me that it's been refinished...probably very well, but still refinished. Most average 1914 1911s are more patina than blue these days, unless they've been exquisitely cared for for the last 97+- years.

Then again, who knows...
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:09:49 AM EDT
Yes. Lots of Kimbers around, not many 1914 Colt 1911's hanging around.  

Nike (Just do it)
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:24:57 AM EDT
Good luck!
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 12:30:36 AM EDT
A over priced turd for a Ferrari...

Get the Ferrari.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:39:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Before you leap at it - why are you buying it; for collecting, or for shooting?


If you're buying it for shooting, inspect it...check the firing pin hole in the breechface; dry fire the gun 4 or 5 times. If the firing pin sticks forward...walk away unless you plan on having a breech plug fitted. Check the slide stop notch. If it's been deformed...walk away, unless you plan on having it peened back into place and spot-hardened. Both of those were improvements made on the 1911A1 to prevent those issues.


If you're buying it for collecting, again inspect it before you buy it. Make sure it's original and correct. Check to see if it's been refinished. If it's been re-arsenaled, check the markings and verify that it's otherwise "correct" for a refinished/rebuilt military gun. There's a lot of documentation on the web and in books about this stuff; be prepared to read for a few months...

For the price they're asking for it, I'd be a little leery that it's not original.  Either that, or it is, and the seller doesn't know what they have, which perversely increases the chances of it being monkeyed with as they wouldn't know any better. The fact that you described it as "beautiful" indicate to me that it's been refinished...probably very well, but still refinished. Most average 1914 1911s are more patina than blue these days, unless they've been exquisitely cared for for the last 97+- years.

Then again, who knows...


...........yep, you gonna shoot it or just keep it to look at,

Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:43:17 AM EDT
There is nothing about a Kimber worth keep in the face of the described 1911 regardless of the old 1911.  Even if it's a parts gun, it would be worth it to me.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:46:38 AM EDT
No question, do it.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:49:54 AM EDT
Are you kidding me? Yes.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:54:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DocBull:
A over priced turd for a Ferrari...

Get the Ferrari.


Link Posted: 6/23/2011 3:58:08 AM EDT
IMHO, if everything checks out, I'd definitely do it regardless of whether you plan to shoot it or not.  

Piece of American History > Run of the mill, widely available pistol

Now if its' been refinished, bubba'd up a bit, etc....that's a different story
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 4:19:05 AM EDT
I would do it. I have no faith in Kimber after the one I had.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 4:20:16 AM EDT
What a stupid question..





Yes Corky make the trade!
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 4:28:20 AM EDT
do it
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 4:29:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2011 4:31:50 AM EDT by DriftPunch]
Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Before you leap at it - why are you buying it; for collecting, or for shooting?


If you're buying it for shooting, inspect it...check the firing pin hole in the breechface; dry fire the gun 4 or 5 times. If the firing pin sticks forward...walk away unless you plan on having a breech plug fitted. Check the slide stop notch. If it's been deformed...walk away, unless you plan on having it peened back into place and spot-hardened. Both of those were improvements made on the 1911A1 to prevent those issues.


If you're buying it for collecting, again inspect it before you buy it. Make sure it's original and correct. Check to see if it's been refinished. If it's been re-arsenaled, check the markings and verify that it's otherwise "correct" for a refinished/rebuilt military gun. There's a lot of documentation on the web and in books about this stuff; be prepared to read for a few months...

For the price they're asking for it, I'd be a little leery that it's not original.  Either that, or it is, and the seller doesn't know what they have, which perversely increases the chances of it being monkeyed with as they wouldn't know any better. The fact that you described it as "beautiful" indicate to me that it's been refinished...probably very well, but still refinished. Most average 1914 1911s are more patina than blue these days, unless they've been exquisitely cared for for the last 97+- years.

Then again, who knows...


This is excellent advice.

Like many US guns, 1911 collector value is based on originality or documented provenance.  The fact that it's old and 'might' have had an interesting life is meaningless.  If it's not all original, the value plummets as the people with the bucks are no longer interested.  While possible, it's not likely that this one escaped the tentacles of 1911 collectors and just happened to pop up on a retailers shelf.  Many people passed for it to be there.  



Top Top