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Posted: 4/24/2016 10:57:49 AM EDT
Bro in my AO has a Bristoline Triocular, sort of like this one:



300 smackers, with wooden carry case.  I've always wanted one of these, because I could hook up my old Nikon SLR and do microphotography.  Not that I have a SINGLE legit use for such a thing; I'm a machinist by trade.

Ad's been up for 12 days, so I'm thinking of offering him $200.  Again, it's nothing, at all, I need, and I'm looking at buying a new car soon, too.  

But what thinkest the hivemind?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:00:41 AM EDT

Quoted:


Bro in my AO has a Bristoline Triocular, sort of like this one:



http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0452/4209/products/163_493c5696-f927-4887-92dd-f4199d542573_grande.JPG?v=1405622759



300 smackers, with wooden carry case.  I've always wanted one of these, because I could hook up my old Nikon SLR and do microphotography.  Not that I have a SINGLE legit use for such a thing; I'm a machinist by trade.



Ad's been up for 12 days, so I'm thinking of offering him $200.  Again, it's nothing, at all, I need, and I'm looking at buying a new car soon, too.  



But what thinkest the hivemind?
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If you've always wanted one, and you have the opportunity, hell yea.



 
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:02:59 AM EDT
Depends?  Do you want to look at shit?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:03:27 AM EDT
Sure
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:04:22 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Depends?  Do you want to look at shit?
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Well, that's ONE thing you could look at...  Microbes are supposed to be awesome this time of year. (Poop Thred! )
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:08:42 AM EDT
That style of scope has a very specific use. Namely, looking at thin sections/specimens mounted on slides. For general "looking at stuff", a dissecting scope might be a better choice.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:10:34 AM EDT
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Quoted:
That style of scope has a very specific use. Namely, looking at thin sections/specimens mounted on slides. For general "looking at stuff", a dissecting scope might be a better choice.
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See now, THIS is the kind of advice I was hoping for.  We had a simple scope as a kid, and I'd look at coins & such by lighting them up from the side, but good point.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 11:27:22 AM EDT
Looking for your penis?

I had one as a kid too and it was great. Had a cover you could remove and reflect the image on a wall or screen.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:25:56 PM EDT
Microscopes are fun! I had one as a kid, I used to look at the scum in my fish aquariums. I saw rotifers, parameciums, vortacellia, and other things.



I work in the microbiology dept now, sometimes I want to make an offer on one of our old half broken ones that get shoved in a closet.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:28:03 PM EDT
you can check your own sperm for motility and viability
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:29:52 PM EDT
An inverted scope is better if you want to look at solid objects or do material analysis.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:33:21 PM EDT
I could hook up my old Nikon SLR and do microphotography.
View Quote


The movement of the SLR mirror will prevent images at anything but the lowest magnifications.

Why would you want to make tiny pictures "microphotography"?

I think you mean photomicrography.  Pictures of tiny objects.

I did medical photomicrography for years.
i could charge a decent price and faster service over the medical schools in my area.
This allowed papers to be submitted for publication.

Give me slide coordinates and desired magnification.
If you come and align it yourself and focus you save $100 a picture.

A dissecting scope  or a metallurgical (reflected light scopes) would probbaly be more useful.


Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:38:34 PM EDT
I had a passing interest in this myself and the price isn't that bad. The information others have posted is also helpful.

But, for a microscope newbie who is only modestly familiar with the difference between a magnifying glass and a microscope, can someone provide a brief explanation of what all these different kinds of microscopes are, and the relevant differences between them for someone who is a casual picture taker? Like OP, I am not looking to solve the mysteries of microbiology but just to maybe get some interesting pictures.

Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:40:39 PM EDT
Get a stereo microscope instead.  I have both, and the stereo is better since you don't need to put shit on slides.  I like looking at ticks and misc shit.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:43:03 PM EDT
You will use it once and the 200 could be better used elsewhere.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:49:58 PM EDT
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Quoted:
You will use it once and the 200 could be better used elsewhere.
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Ban him! He is arguing against more toys! Heresy!

For photo equipment, 200 bucks is chewing gum money.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:57:03 PM EDT
Its cool and i would like one but lets face it, id never used it
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:14:35 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I had a passing interest in this myself and the price isn't that bad. The information others have posted is also helpful.

But, for a microscope newbie who is only modestly familiar with the difference between a magnifying glass and a microscope, can someone provide a brief explanation of what all these different kinds of microscopes are, and the relevant differences between them for someone who is a casual picture taker? Like OP, I am not looking to solve the mysteries of microbiology but just to maybe get some interesting pictures.

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Quoted:
I had a passing interest in this myself and the price isn't that bad. The information others have posted is also helpful.

But, for a microscope newbie who is only modestly familiar with the difference between a magnifying glass and a microscope, can someone provide a brief explanation of what all these different kinds of microscopes are, and the relevant differences between them for someone who is a casual picture taker? Like OP, I am not looking to solve the mysteries of microbiology but just to maybe get some interesting pictures.


Dissecting scope:



Amazon, $150

This binocular pillar-stand stereo microscope offers three magnification powers, 20X, 40X & 80X. It comes with a versatile illumination system that provides both incident (top) lighting and transmitted (bottom) illumination. You can choose between incident illumination shining down onto the object or transmitted illumination through the frosted stage plate. The first is used for the observation of three-dimensional objects and the second for the observation of slides.


Metallurgical/inverted scope:



Amazon, $1,250!!! :-O

Inverted metallurgical microscope uses transmitted and reflected light to view metallic specimens, including electronics, or larger specimens not viewable on a standard microscope stage
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:17:59 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Quoted:
I had a passing interest in this myself and the price isn't that bad. The information others have posted is also helpful.

But, for a microscope newbie who is only modestly familiar with the difference between a magnifying glass and a microscope, can someone provide a brief explanation of what all these different kinds of microscopes are, and the relevant differences between them for someone who is a casual picture taker? Like OP, I am not looking to solve the mysteries of microbiology but just to maybe get some interesting pictures.


Dissecting scope:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41nt5H0QCAL.jpg

Amazon, $150

This binocular pillar-stand stereo microscope offers three magnification powers, 20X, 40X & 80X. It comes with a versatile illumination system that provides both incident (top) lighting and transmitted (bottom) illumination. You can choose between incident illumination shining down onto the object or transmitted illumination through the frosted stage plate. The first is used for the observation of three-dimensional objects and the second for the observation of slides.


Metallurgical/inverted scope:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41LKBA9SH4L.jpg

Amazon, $1,250!!! :-O

Inverted metallurgical microscope uses transmitted and reflected light to view metallic specimens, including electronics, or larger specimens not viewable on a standard microscope stage


Thanks. Now for a real dummy like me, what does this mean in terms of being able to get pretty, interesting pics?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:20:55 PM EDT
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Quoted:


The movement of the SLR mirror will prevent images at anything but the lowest magnifications.
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Quoted:
I could hook up my old Nikon SLR and do microphotography.


The movement of the SLR mirror will prevent images at anything but the lowest magnifications.

 I wouldv'e thot having it firmly fixed to the scope would eliminate that, but I xpect you're right.  Looks like I'd have to invest in one of these:



High quality microscope USB digital camera offers 640x480 effective pixel resolution, compatible with Windows XP/Vista/7/8/10
Captures still images and streams real-time videos on your computer screen


At $40, not bad.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:21:08 PM EDT
"If you will it, Dude, it is no dream"


Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:25:03 PM EDT
My Grandpa, a machinist, built a microscope. I have it, its one of my treasured possessions.

I remember I bought him some slides when I was about 8 so he could look at them.

That was 50 years ago!
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:25:30 PM EDT
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Quoted:


Thanks. Now for a real dummy like me, what does this mean in terms of being able to get pretty, interesting pics?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I had a passing interest in this myself and the price isn't that bad. The information others have posted is also helpful.

But, for a microscope newbie who is only modestly familiar with the difference between a magnifying glass and a microscope, can someone provide a brief explanation of what all these different kinds of microscopes are, and the relevant differences between them for someone who is a casual picture taker? Like OP, I am not looking to solve the mysteries of microbiology but just to maybe get some interesting pictures.


Dissecting scope:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41nt5H0QCAL.jpg

Amazon, $150

This binocular pillar-stand stereo microscope offers three magnification powers, 20X, 40X & 80X. It comes with a versatile illumination system that provides both incident (top) lighting and transmitted (bottom) illumination. You can choose between incident illumination shining down onto the object or transmitted illumination through the frosted stage plate. The first is used for the observation of three-dimensional objects and the second for the observation of slides.


Metallurgical/inverted scope:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41LKBA9SH4L.jpg

Amazon, $1,250!!! :-O

Inverted metallurgical microscope uses transmitted and reflected light to view metallic specimens, including electronics, or larger specimens not viewable on a standard microscope stage


Thanks. Now for a real dummy like me, what does this mean in terms of being able to get pretty, interesting pics?

On that, I do not know.  Perhaps some real scope experts could provide pointers for some total n00bs?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:26:25 PM EDT
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Quoted:
You will use it once and the 200 could be better used elsewhere.
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Yea, that's kinda my thinking, too.  Heck, maybe I'll offer him $150.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:34:24 PM EDT

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Quoted:


Microscopes are fun! I had one as a kid, I used to look at the scum in my fish aquariums. I saw rotifers, parameciums, vortacellia, and other things.



I work in the microbiology dept now, sometimes I want to make an offer on one of our old half broken ones that get shoved in a closet.

View Quote
UT has a surplus property department that regularly has public auctions.  You can get all sorts of interesting things.

 
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:40:13 PM EDT
Do it! There's a whole new world out there waiting for you to explore.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 2:52:35 PM EDT
I bought a 1948 Biocular AO Spencer at a yard sale in my neighborhood.  Only issues with it are that it was dirty and missing an objective.  I plan on cleaning it up and letting my kids use it.  Why'd I really buy it?  $20, man!  

 
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 3:48:30 PM EDT
I am not an expert but I do know some basics.  For looking at everyday objects get a low power digital microscope.  Unless you have the money for an SEM, these can image things like pennies, insects, and other items better than other types.  A true biological microscope for use with specimen slides would be good for observing cellular activity in pound water, blood, or other fluids.

In my job I use a metallurgical microscope, but it requires a way to mount and polish the samples and chemicals to be of any use.  Avoid this type it requires a lab to properly support.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 3:59:31 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I am not an expert but I do know some basics.  For looking at everyday objects get a low power digital microscope.  Unless you have the money for an SEM, these can image things like pennies, insects, and other items better than other types.  A true biological microscope for use with specimen slides would be good for observing cellular activity in pound water, blood, or other fluids.

In my job I use a metallurgical microscope, but it requires a way to mount and polish the samples and chemicals to be of any use.  Avoid this type it requires a lab to properly support.
View Quote

SEM?  Scanning Electron Microscope?  Or...?

Good point on the metallurgical microscope.  I used one in college for my engineering degree, but that was many moons ago, and I'm not keen on preparing samples with all the fine sanding and such.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:03:44 PM EDT
Do you  want a microscope?

Can you  afford a microscope?

Do you envision Yourself using a microscope of. An even semi regular basis?

Then  but  a microscope.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:04:42 PM EDT
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Quoted:
That style of scope has a very specific use. Namely, looking at thin sections/specimens mounted on slides. For general "looking at stuff", a dissecting scope might be a better choice.
View Quote

I would rather have a dissection scope too.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:10:33 PM EDT
Our SEM at work is pretty cool. Let's you identify elemental components as well as beautiful images.

I did a bunch of work on a scanning laser confocal at my last job. That was some neat technology, too.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:11:01 PM EDT

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Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:12:29 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Our SEM at work is pretty cool. Let's you identify elemental components as well as beautiful images.

I did a bunch of work on a scanning laser confocal at my last job. That was some neat technology, too.
View Quote

And again, what is an SEM?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:15:02 PM EDT
SEM = Scanning Electron Microscope.

If you have to ask, you can't afford one.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:15:18 PM EDT
Scanning Electron Microscope
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:15:44 PM EDT
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Quoted:


The movement of the SLR mirror will prevent images at anything but the lowest magnifications.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Quoted:
I could hook up my old Nikon SLR and do microphotography.


The movement of the SLR mirror will prevent images at anything but the lowest magnifications.

Most good SLRs allow you to decouple the mirror from the curtain/sensor.

i.e. first press of the shutter release moves the mirror out of the light path, the second fires the sensor or curtain.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 4:35:12 PM EDT

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Quoted:


Our SEM at work is pretty cool. Let's you identify elemental components as well as beautiful images.



I did a bunch of work on a scanning laser confocal at my last job. That was some neat technology, too.
View Quote
Try a FIB/SEM.  Write your name on the head of a needle!

 
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