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Posted: 10/3/2004 5:48:42 PM EST



S. 2627


To express the policy of the United States with respect to the adherence by the United States to global standards in the transfer of small arms and light weapons, and for other purposes.


IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 8, 2004
Mrs. FEINSTEIN (for herself, Mr. AKAKA, and Mr. LEAHY) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A BILL
To express the policy of the United States with respect to the adherence by the United States to global standards in the transfer of small arms and light weapons, and for other purposes.


Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Security and Fair Enforcement in Arms Trafficking Act of 2004'.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The global proliferation of small arms and light weapons represents a real and pressing threat to peace, development, democracy, human rights, and United States national security interests around the globe.

(2) The legitimate and responsible transfer of small arms and light weapons, and the application of international standards and legally binding instruments to stem the illicit trade in these weapons, are important elements of United States foreign policy that enhance United States and international security, strengthen United States alliances and partnerships, and promote global peace and freedom, and are critical to efforts to combat terrorism, narco-trafficking, international organized crime, regional and local conflicts, and the recruitment and use of child soldiers in these conflicts.

(3) It is in the national interest of the United States to promote responsibility and restraint in the transfer of small arms and light weapons, to combat irresponsible practices in such transfers, to ensure that nations engaged in substandard practices are held accountable, and to encourage other members of the international community to meet, as minimum standards, United States law and practice.

(4) In light of the cruel terror attacks on Washington, D.C., and New York City on September 11, 2001, it is in the national interest of the United States to take all possible measures to prevent dangerous weapons from falling into the wrong hands. Special emphasis should be placed on combating the proliferation of small arms and light weapons within the broader counterterrorism strategy, given the clear links between global networks of terrorism, networks of the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons, and states that harbor and support terrorists.

(5) Small arms and light weapons are the weapons of choice of terrorists and their networks. Because these groups take advantage of existing licit and illicit channels, an appropriate international response must target the suppliers of these weapons and the brokers who facilitate illicit deals and must shut down the networks that allow this trade to continue.

(6) United States military personnel, diplomats, and humanitarian workers, as well as those of the allies of the United States, are threatened by the easy availability of small arms and light weapons in conflict zones.

(7) The proliferation and ready availability of small arms and light weapons has been a major factor in the devastation in Angola, Cambodia, Liberia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Sri Lanka, East Timor, and Afghanistan and the violence endemic to narco-trafficking in Colombia, Mexico, Thailand, and Myanmar, and has contributed significantly to war crimes and crimes against humanity perpetrated in Cambodia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, East Timor, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Kosovo.

(8) The case of Afghanistan, where the Taliban and the al Qaeda network were able to amass a small arms and light weapons arsenal from various actors in the regional and international illicit trade, including through links to the international drug trade, other regional terrorist groups, and donations from certain individuals in other countries in the region, and from support of the civil war in Afghanistan by various countries, clearly demonstrates how a country can become a threat to regional and even global peace and security if it is continuously flooded by various actors with small arms and light weapons and if arms embargoes are systematically broken.

(9) The proliferation of small arms and light weapons continues to threaten civilians and members of the Armed Forces of the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan, undermine stabilization and reconstruction efforts Iraq and Afghanistan, and complicate efforts to establish effective and viable governments in those countries.

(10) The United States and the international community took an important step toward promoting global standards in the transfer of small arms and light weapons in completing in 2001 the Protocol Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, their Parts and Components, and Ammunition, supplementing the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime.

(11) The United States, as a major supplier country, has a special obligation to promote responsible practices in the transfer of small arms and light weapons.

(12) Because semiautomatic assault weapons and related equipment, the manufacture, transfer, or possession of which is unlawful under section 922 of title 18, United States Code, are easily diverted to terrorist networks, the abstention by the United
States from all transfers, for commercial use, of such weapons and equipment would assist efforts to limit the global proliferation of small arms and light weapons.


(13) To be successful in such efforts, it is necessary for the United States to work with other countries to improve effective international standards.

(14) The United Nations Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects, held in New York from July 9 to 20, 2001, represented an opportunity to develop better national and international regulations to control the trade in illicit small arms and light weapons. However, the Program of Action did too little to advance international standards in the transfer of small arms and light weapons.

(15) At the First Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the United Nations Programme of Action on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects in July 2003, Assistant Secretary of State Lincoln P. Bloomfield offered a progress report on the implementation by the United States of the United Nations Programme of Action on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects and asserted that the United States has done much to implement the recommendations of the Programme. Nonetheless, there is an urgent and pressing need for a greater United States commitment to eradicating the proliferation of small arms and light weapons.

SEC. 3. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS.

It is the sense of Congress that, because of the interest of the United States in combating international crime, preventing the diversion of small arms and light weapons to narco-traffickers, international organized criminal networks, terrorists, and recipients engaged in gross and consistent violations of internationally recognized human rights and international humanitarian law, and promoting fairness in international trade, the United States should--

(1) support the effort to negotiate a binding instrument on international small arms transfers, such as the global Arms Trade Treaty; and

(2) enter into negotiations for international agreements on--

(A) the marking and tracing of small arms and light weapons;

(B) regulations for the activities of arms brokers;

(C) greater transparency in licensing and export of small arms and light weapons; and

(D) the establishment of an international regime for the destruction of surplus weapons and the security of stockpiles.

SEC. 4. DECLARATIONS OF POLICY.

(a) AFFIRMATION OF POLICY- It is the policy of the United States--

(1) to maintain the highest standards for the management of, restraint in, and safety in the export of small arms and light weapons and the safety in the transfer abroad of small arms and light weapons;

(2) to refrain from exporting small arms and light weapons that might be used for internal repression or international aggression or contribute to regional instability; and

(3) to increase the number of end-use checks of United States transfers in small arms and light weapons and to improve the quality of end-use monitoring, particularly the cooperation between United States missions abroad and the Office of Defense Trade Control.

(b) CONTINUATION OF EXISTING POLICIES- It is the policy of the United States--

(1) under section 502B(a)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not to provide security assistance, including the transfer of small arms and light weapons, to any recipient that engages in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights;

(2) that, in an effort to protect the legitimate trade in small arms and light weapons, and to ensure United States laws are enforced, individuals subject to the jurisdiction of the United States engaged in arms brokering activities register with the Department of State and obtain a license for each transaction;

(3) to carry out rigorous end-use checks of transfers in small arms and light weapons in order to prevent illegal retransfers of United States small arms and light weapons;

(4) not to authorize for export to commercial end-users semiautomatic assault weapons, or related equipment, the manufacture, transfer, or possession of which is unlawful under section 922 of title 18, United States Code; and

(5) to continue to observe the `Statement of Common Principles on Small Arms and Light Weapons' agreed to by the United States and the European Union at the December 17, 1999, summit in Washington, D.C.

SEC. 5. INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATIONS.

(a) ADHERENCE TO PROHIBITION ON EXPORTS- It is the sense of Congress that the President should enter into negotiations with foreign parties, beginning with the European Union and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member states, for an international agreement not to export to commercial end-users semiautomatic assault weapons, or related equipment, the manufacture, transfer, or possession of which is unlawful under section 922 of title 18, United States Code.

(b) MARKING OF SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS- It is the sense of Congress that the President should make best efforts to conclude an international agreement on the marking of small arms and light weapons for international export as advocated by the Protocol Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Components, and Ammunition, supplementing the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, adopted by United Nations General Assembly resolution 55/255 on June 8, 2001.

(c) ENFORCEMENT OF UNITED NATIONS ARMS EMBARGOES- It is the sense of Congress that the President should enter negotiations at the United Nations level in order to improve the enforcement of United Nations arms embargoes insofar as they relate to small arms and light weapons. The President should propose to the United Nations Security Council the establishment of an arms embargo monitoring unit at the United Nations headquarters in New York.

(d) COMPREHENSIVE AGREEMENT-

(1) IN GENERAL- It is the sense of Congress that the President should enter into negotiations on a legally binding international agreement or agreements with foreign parties, beginning with the European Union, that would comprise the following elements:

(A) The marking and tracing of small arms and light weapons.

(B) Regulating the activities of arms brokers, including an international register and watchlist of arms brokers.

(C) Greater transparency in the licensing and export of small arms and light weapons.

(D) A prohibition against the transfer of small arms and light weapons to recipients engaged in gross and consistent violations of internationally recognized human rights and international humanitarian law.

(E) Establishment of an international regime for the destruction of surplus weapons and the security of stockpiles.

(2) PERIODIC REPORTS- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and semiannually thereafter, the President shall submit an unclassified report to the appropriate congressional committees describing the progress toward negotiating an agreement or agreements described in paragraph (1).

(e) IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAM OF ACTION OF UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE-

(1) IN GENERAL- It is the sense of Congress that the President should make best efforts to advance international negotiations to implement the Program of Action of the 2001 United Nations Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects, as well as to advance and extend the goals of the Program of Action, including--

(A) establishing national regulations and international agreements on arms brokering;

(B) establishing national regulations and international agreements on the marking and tracing of small arms and light weapons;

(C) promoting greater security for weapons stockpiles held by states;

(D) efforts to carry out more effective post-conflict disarmament and demobilization programs;

(E) criminalizing the production, possession, stockpiling, and trade of illicit small arms and light weapons; and

(F) advancing the role of civil society and nongovernmental institutions in addressing the proliferation of small arms and light weapons.

(2) PERIODIC REPORTS- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and not later than December 31 of every year thereafter through 2006, the President shall transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a report describing the activities undertaken, and the progress made, by the Department of State or other agencies and entities of the United States Government in implementing the goals of the Program of Action, including specific steps taken to assist other countries in implementing the Program of Action.

SEC. 6. NATO PROGRAMS.

(a) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that the President should propose at the North Atlantic Council--

(1) the establishment among North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) members of a program on stockpile management, security, and destruction of small arms and light weapons; and

(2) the establishment of cooperative programs on stockpile management, security, and destruction of small arms and light weapons with non-NATO states of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

(b) REPORTS- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and semiannually thereafter, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees an unclassified report describing progress made toward the establishment of the programs referred to in subsection (a).

SEC. 7. INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION AGAINST THE ILLICIT MANUFACTURING OF AND TRAFFICKING IN FIREARMS, AMMUNITION, EXPLOSIVES, AND OTHER RELATED MATERIALS.

(a) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that the Secretary of State should encourage those countries that have not done so to sign and ratify the Inter-American Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunitions, Explosives, and Other Related Materials, adopted at Washington November 14, 1997, and entered into force July 1, 1998.

(b) REPORTS- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report describing--

(1) the activities undertaken, and the progress made, by the Department of State or other agencies and entities of the United States Government in prompting other countries that have not done so to sign and ratify the Convention;

(2) the implementation of, and compliance with, the provisions of the Convention by states that have signed and ratified the Convention; and

(3) the recommendations made by the Consultative Committee established under the Convention, and any actions related to those recommendations taken by the United States.

SEC. 8. ANNUAL REPORT ON STATES THAT HAVE NOT COOPERATED IN SMALL ARMS PROGRAMS.

Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report--

(1) listing each state that refuses to cooperate in programs related to small arms and light weapons, including programs with respect to stockpile management, security, and destruction, and describing to what degree the failure to cooperate affects the national security of such state, its neighbors, and the United States;

(2) describing the activities undertaken, and the progress made, by the Department of State or other agencies and entities of the United States Government in prompting other states to cooperate in programs related to small arms and light weapons; and

(3) recommending incentives and penalties that may be used by the United States Government to compel states to comply with programs on small arms and light weapons.

SEC. 9. CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION ON CERTAIN EXPORT LICENSES.

(a) IN GENERAL- Not less than 15 days before the grant of any license for export to any country described in subsection (b) of any lethal defense article or defense service consisting of small arms or light weapons in the amount of $1,000,000 or less, the President shall provide a detailed notification thereof to the Committees on Appropriations and Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committees on Appropriations and International Relations of the House of Representatives, including a statement describing the purposes for which the article or service is being provided to the country and stating whether or not such article or service has been previously provided to such country.

(b) COVERED COUNTRIES- A country described in this section is a country where there is a clear risk that the defense article or defense service will--

(1) be used in a breach of peace or act of international aggression--

(A) to commit gross violations of human rights;

(B) to commit gross violations of international humanitarian law; or

(C) to commit acts of genocide or crimes against humanity; or

(2) be diverted to commit any of the acts described in paragraph (1).

SEC. 10. REGISTRY OF SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS SERIAL NUMBERS.

(a) IN GENERAL- Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

`(k) REGISTRY OF SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS SERIAL NUMBERS- (1) The President shall require that, prior to the export of any firearm listed in category I of the United States Munition List that requires a license for international export under this section, the exporter shall provide the President with written identification of the serial number of the firearm to be exported.

`(2) The President shall establish and maintain a registry of each serial number provided under paragraph (1).'.

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply to applications for licenses to export filed on or after the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 11. STATUTORY CONSTRUCTION.

Nothing in this Act--

(1) interferes with the legitimate and lawful ownership and use of guns; or

(2) limits otherwise authorized activities of the United States Government.

SEC. 12. DEFINITIONS.

In this Act:

(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- The term `appropriate congressional committees' means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives.

(2) PRESIDENT- The term `President' means the President, acting through the Secretary of State.

(3) SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS-

(A) COVERED ITEMS- Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the term `small arms and light weapons' means revolvers and self-loading pistols, rifles and carbines, submachine guns, assault rifles, light machine guns, heavy machine guns, hand-held underbarrel and mounted grenade launchers, portable antiaircraft guns, portable antitank guns, recoilless rifles, portable launchers of antitank missiles and rocket systems, portable launchers of antiaircraft missile systems, mortars of calibers of less than 100 millimeter, ammunition and explosives, cartridges and rounds for small arms and light weapons, mobile containers with missiles or shells for single-action antiaircraft and antitank systems, antipersonnel and antitank hand grenades, landmines, and explosives.

(B) EXCEPTION- The term does not include any antique firearm manufactured before January 1, 1900, or any replica of such a firearm.
END



What is a commerical end user?

CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 5:50:43 PM EST
Basically would this be a ban of US made guns to other countries like Spain, Canada , Norway, ect unless for the govt??

CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 5:51:42 PM EST
Well, this is it...

The 'New' gun control issue is 'Compliance with the UN Small Arms Control Treaty, whatever it may be'...
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 5:53:33 PM EST
BITCH
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 5:54:29 PM EST
Every time I see " adherence by the United States to global standards" or some such other dribble, spoken by a U.S. politician, I cringe and get very angry.

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 5:55:22 PM EST
This whole bill is scary.

Our guns are already marked in the US with a serial number.

CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:00:15 PM EST
Sounds like she is getting her information from IANSA.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:01:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By Strats:
Every time I see "adherence by the United States to global standards" or some such other dribble, spoken by a U.S. politician, I cringe and get very angry.





Your not alone, and angry would be a understatement
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:02:36 PM EST
Sigh. Sometimes hip-waders aren't even high enough for the bullshit our officials expose us to.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:04:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By Shooter505:
Sounds like she is getting her information from IANSA.



Completely.

Many US gun control groups are members of IANSA.

CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:07:38 PM EST
I believe we have members here from Netherlands, Norway, England, New Zealand, Canada, Israel, South Africa, Finland, ect.

Now it's already hard for them to get AR-15 parts but this will ban the export of any US made "assault weapon" outside of the US.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:14:05 PM EST
Time to buy stock in all the foreign companies making AK's
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:16:46 PM EST
Does anybody even care what that bitch thinks anymore?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:17:54 PM EST
You might have to if she gets any power back.

At any rate I expect the EU countries to agree to this.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:18:53 PM EST
Another reason why the 17th Amendment must be repealled...........


and why she, Chuckie and most Senators should be forced to eat shit and die.

Dave S

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:20:02 PM EST
She needs to just go away! This bitch needs a good friend. We should all chip in and buy her a nice huge dildo so she will be occupied for a few years!
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:20:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 6:20:56 PM EST by warlord]
The Ruskies will step in and take up the slack. I'm sure that they manufacturing can make all of the necessary parts for the AR15/M16.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:22:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:24:46 PM EST
". The US ( Bush Administration) has opposed such suggestions as prohibiting the sale of military assault weapons to civilians "

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:25:00 PM EST
It will never end...Seriously



They are trying to disarm americans


Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:25:18 PM EST
Looks like a back door US gun control bill. If we ban guns going to other countries, other countries may then ban them from coming in to the US. This will Shrink the consumer base of the gun makers and which will also shrink profits causing the shut down of more gun factories. If the gun banners cannot get gun control through congress or by junk lawsuits, this may be next plan of attack on our freedoms.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:25:55 PM EST
And citizens in our allied countries as well.

They are trying to disarm ALL civilians EVERYWHERE!

CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:27:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 6:28:03 PM EST by m98codered]
Appearantly this he-shi haven't been gettin' any bang-bang from its partner lately.....he-shi can't find anything else to do so he-shi picks to write this bill up about AW's
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:29:08 PM EST
I think we should all draw straws and get someone to pleasure her. I think one of us could take one for the team, to settle her down. Arvin
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:30:19 PM EST
I sent her a nice letter about the UN thugs and what a sellout she is, and what an embarrassment it is to explain her actions to my kids. Threw in a sentence or two for the legitimate small-arms businesses and their fine products. I always take the time to admonish her, and often Boxer too.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:31:28 PM EST
Someone please explain to me why the hell a criminal would go out of their way to get a US made SEMI-AUTO when they can get class 3 items on the black market easier in various parts of the world???


Ohhh... the "choice" of terrorists?

I bet they use Verizon cell phones...

BAN VERIZON


Now I'm all flustered and sputtering. This woman is a prime example of why someone sat down one day and thought "Hmmm... cunt? That's a good word. I think i'll use that to describe women that, despite being women, deserve a punch in the fucking face"

/rant

Carry on.

- BG
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:33:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By gunman0:
BITCH



+1
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:36:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:

Ohhh... the "choice" of terrorists?

I bet they use Verizon cell phones...

BAN VERIZON

- BG



ban the use of those GM/chevy/retal vans an...terrorist love them...
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:39:07 PM EST
When they mean "assault weapons" in the UN they mean any automatic or semi automatic look alike.



"States should work towards ... appropriate national legislation, regulations and licensing requirements that define conditions under which firearms can be acquired, used and traded by private persons. In particular, they should consider the prohibition of unrestricted trade and private ownership of small arms and light weapons specifically designed for military purposes, such as automatic guns (e.g., assault rifles and machine-guns). "



CRC
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:44:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:
Does it pass a global test?



Almost had beer shoot out of my nose!
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:45:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 6:46:34 PM EST by CRC]
Bump

Important
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:55:50 PM EST
I knew there was a reason I bought two M4S90's. If this passes, domestic mfg'ers will then be the next target. I'd add that, foreign parts are probably another restricted item under this law, or will be.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:07:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By CRC:


(4) In light of the cruel terror attacks on Washington, D.C., and New York City on September 11, 2001, it is in the national interest of the United States to take all possible measures to prevent dangerous weapons from falling into the wrong hands. Special emphasis should be placed on combating the proliferation of small arms and light weapons within the broader counterterrorism strategy, given the clear links between global networks of terrorism, networks of the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons, and states that harbor and support terrorists.




Virginia, you stupid cunt.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:14:10 PM EST
Agreed. She is a big stiupid cunt. VA was attacked, not DC. When will she get stroke?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:18:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:31:58 PM EST
Let's see if I have this right: In view of the attacks on September 11, 2001 . . . we should curb traffic in small arms. Is that the reasoning here?

I think we are a little closer to learning the definitive answer to the question "How stupid do you have to be to be a leftist?"
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