Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 9/9/2013 5:04:52 AM EDT
So i have recently moved into a new home. This house is on a slab and since this is going to be a fairly permanent move my safe is getting bolted to the slab.

I have a hammer drill the proper bit and the correct anchors to do the job. My only concern is the carpet. Trying to drill through carpet is problematic as it tends to snag and cause pulls in the carpet. So what do i do?

Do i just cut some smaller holes in the carpet and then put the safe in place and drill through the pre drilled holes in the safe floor into the concrete? It sucks having little square holes in the carpet but i guess i'm never going to see it..


Am i just over thinking this shit?
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:06:09 AM EDT
Quoted:
So i have recently moved into a new home. This house is on a slab and since this is going to be a fairly permanent move my safe is getting bolted to the slab.

I have a hammer drill the proper bit and the correct anchors to do the job. My only concern is the carpet. Trying to drill through carpet is problematic as it tends to snag and cause pulls in the carpet. So what do i do?

Do i just cut some smaller holes in the carpet and then put the safe in place and drill through the pre drilled holes in the safe floor into the concrete? It sucks having little square holes in the carpet but i guess i'm never going to see it..


Am i just over thinking this shit?
View Quote



yes
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:06:23 AM EDT
I usually just cut an "X" in the carpet, but go slow when you start drilling so you can see if the carpet is pulling.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:13:01 AM EDT
Perhaps you could cut three sides of a ~1" square in the carpet around each hole to make flaps, then fold them back out of the way? Then if/when the safe is removed, you can just fold the flap back down.

Rather than drilling through the holes in the safe, I would mark (Sharpie) the holes through the safe, then move it out of the way and drill.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:14:48 AM EDT
Just cut an X in it. If you cut a flap and fold it back, the carpet will crease and not lay flat if/when you remove it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:16:09 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I usually just cut an "X" in the carpet, but go slow when you start drilling so you can see if the carpet is pulling.
View Quote
this



x, pull back then drill, use a piece of pvc to hold water/keep carpet back



 
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:18:42 AM EDT
What about cutting X's like others have said and using some glue around the edges to prevent the pulling.  It works to prevent fabric edges from coming apart, maybe it could be useful here?
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:23:34 AM EDT
Cut away the carpet underneath the safe, or you'll be wasting your time.

The carpet will allow a void beneath the safe for a potential thief to insert pry bars beneath.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:32:51 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Cut away the carpet underneath the safe, or you'll be wasting your time.

The carpet will allow a void beneath the safe for a potential thief to insert pry bars beneath.
View Quote


You have been around the wrong concrete anchors.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:35:18 AM EDT
I used six 3/8" steel anchors when I set my safe.  It's tight to the floor, good luck getting a pry bar in there.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:37:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Cut away the carpet underneath the safe, or you'll be wasting your time.

The carpet will allow a void beneath the safe for a potential thief to insert pry bars beneath.
View Quote


Possibly.. but my magic 8 ball is telling me highly unlikely.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:38:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:41:21 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
this

x, pull back then drill, use a piece of pvc to hold water/keep carpet back


always worked for me.
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I usually just cut an "X" in the carpet, but go slow when you start drilling so you can see if the carpet is pulling.
this

x, pull back then drill, use a piece of pvc to hold water/keep carpet back


always worked for me.
 

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:48:26 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


You have been around the wrong concrete anchors.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Cut away the carpet underneath the safe, or you'll be wasting your time.

The carpet will allow a void beneath the safe for a potential thief to insert pry bars beneath.


You have been around the wrong concrete anchors.



We used Hilti building 50+ story buildings, so no.

Carpet is pretty soft.  It can either be pushed back enough to wiggle a prybar beneath, or burned away in seconds to create enough space to inset pry bar.

A real criminal will have more ideas and motivation than myself.

YMMV
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 5:55:35 AM EDT
As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.

Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.

Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.

Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:11:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:19:43 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Be very careful not to hit the tension cables in your slab if you have them.
View Quote


What's the best way to determine where the are?
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:33:04 AM EDT
Quoted:
So i have recently moved into a new home. This house is on a slab and since this is going to be a fairly permanent move my safe is getting bolted to the slab.

I have a hammer drill the proper bit and the correct anchors to do the job. My only concern is the carpet. Trying to drill through carpet is problematic as it tends to snag and cause pulls in the carpet. So what do i do?

Do i just cut some smaller holes in the carpet and then put the safe in place and drill through the pre drilled holes in the safe floor into the concrete? It sucks having little square holes in the carpet but i guess i'm never going to see it..


Am i just over thinking this shit?
View Quote



Wayyy tooo much over thinking
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:38:56 AM EDT
Slit the carpet where the bolts will go. Make a couple of wire hooks to pull the carpet away from the hole. No, you're not overthinking it. I've tried that little trick. You'd be surprised how fast a good drill can destroy a piece of carpet. I was.

Also, don't bolt the safe direct to the floor. The gap will trap water and it will rust through. It takes a few years, but the bottom of a safe is ten to fourteen gauge steel. It's not that thick and it's going to be in that position for a long time. I'd use wheel bearings as stand offs. They're very hard steel and good luck getting a saw to bite them.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:39:59 AM EDT
Tapered punch to make the hole in the carpet. Insert a short metal tube and drill. You should be able to remove and cover up the hole later.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 7:42:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 7:54:52 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.



Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.



Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.



Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.
View Quote




 
Tearing the carpet out of my house was a somewhat disgusting experience.  
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:24:14 AM EDT
Here is the type of anchor you want to use.  It sits flush to the floor.  Put the safe
where you want it, then you have a jig in place, mark the drill spots through the bottom of
the safe, move safe, insert anchors, move safe back and install machine bolts into anchor.

http://www.toolbarn.com/redhead-rm-12.html?gclid=CMXovajcvrkCFctAMgodG04AKg
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:32:57 AM EDT
This



+







or


Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:35:17 AM EDT
Sharpen the end of a pipe. Place where u want the hole and wack the shit out of it
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:35:45 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I usually just cut an "X" in the carpet, but go slow when you start drilling so you can see if the carpet is pulling.
View Quote

I would do this.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:36:07 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Here is the type of anchor you want to use.  It sits flush to the floor.  Put the safe
where you want it, then you have a jig in place, mark the drill spots through the bottom of
the safe, move safe, insert anchors, move safe back and install machine bolts into anchor.

http://www.toolbarn.com/redhead-rm-12.html?gclid=CMXovajcvrkCFctAMgodG04AKg
View Quote



Those will work, and that is a great brand.

I prefer the wedge style though.

Put safe in place, once, leave it there.  Drill proper sized holes, vacuum dust out, pound anchors in, use large fender washers, tighten nuts down, cut off extra length on the anchors, done.

Some pics of when I did mine.  Took me about 20 minutes.



After:

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 8:38:23 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


What's the best way to determine where the are?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Be very careful not to hit the tension cables in your slab if you have them.


What's the best way to determine where the are?


Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 9:03:54 AM EDT
I am planning on using these Tapcon large diameter anchors as they can be installed with an impact gun. Any reasons not to use them?

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:15:27 AM EDT
Tapcons are rated about the same in tension (pulling) but wedge anchors are stronger in shear (sidways).

Tapcons are hard to install.  Even for the pros.  Do it wrong, and the first rating to go out the window is the tension rating.  Wedge anchors are simple to install, and as long as they are down in the hole, and the nut is tight, they are installed correctly.

Wedge anchors are more forgiving when it comes to the concrete itself.  Bad concrete, a tapcon would not work as well.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:20:10 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Tapcons are rated about the same in tension (pulling) but wedge anchors are stronger in shear (sidways).

Tapcons are hard to install.  Even for the pros.  Do it wrong, and the first rating to go out the window is the tension rating.  Wedge anchors are simple to install, and as long as they are down in the hole, and the nut is tight, they are installed correctly.

Wedge anchors are more forgiving when it comes to the concrete itself.  Bad concrete, a tapcon would not work as well.
View Quote


Thanks, I've read that due to the extra grip an impact is required to install. That removes the feel to the install making it less obvious when to stop running them in. Do the anchors fail or does the concrete get stripped out when installed incorrectly?
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:40:40 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Thanks, I've read that due to the extra grip an impact is required to install. That removes the feel to the install making it less obvious when to stop running them in. Do the anchors fail or does the concrete get stripped out when installed incorrectly?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Tapcons are rated about the same in tension (pulling) but wedge anchors are stronger in shear (sidways).

Tapcons are hard to install.  Even for the pros.  Do it wrong, and the first rating to go out the window is the tension rating.  Wedge anchors are simple to install, and as long as they are down in the hole, and the nut is tight, they are installed correctly.

Wedge anchors are more forgiving when it comes to the concrete itself.  Bad concrete, a tapcon would not work as well.


Thanks, I've read that due to the extra grip an impact is required to install. That removes the feel to the install making it less obvious when to stop running them in. Do the anchors fail or does the concrete get stripped out when installed incorrectly?



I'm not quite sure honestly, as I have never personally installed a Tapcon.  My experience comes from my field guys' feedback.  I don't recall any details of the failures, just that they did.   If I had to guess, I would say that the concrete probably strips out.

My field guys also say that if a specific project requires a high quantity of anchors, they prefer to use the wedge anchors, but if the project only requires a few, they run the Tapcons.

Given that a gunsafe would only require (4), maybe (6) max quantity of anchors, it might not be a bad idea to try.

If it was me, I would run them down the majority of the way with an impact, then finish them off with a sizable ratchet/socket if possible.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:44:33 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I am planning on using these Tapcon large diameter anchors as they can be installed with an impact gun. Any reasons not to use them?

http://www.toolauthority.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/3/1/313flawhqel__sl500_aa300__1.jpg
View Quote


There was a thread in the safe forum and a member here who works at a safe store said LDT's are the way to go.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:50:20 AM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:53:04 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.
View Quote


Google "post tensioned slab on grade" and report back to the class.

Two ways to locate tendons in slab:
1. Look at the formed slab reveal outside the home; the live-end anchor patches will be visible on at least two sides of the house.
The tendons ***typically*** run in a perpendicular grid pattern.  Measuring with a tape will give you an idea of location, but is not fool-proof.
2. If slab is PT, hire a tech to do a GPR scan of the slab.  The radar will image the tendon location and you will know for sure if you're clear.
More expensive than eyeballing the slab reveal, but way cheaper than repairing a broken tendon.

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:53:34 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.

Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.

Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.

Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.
View Quote



I agree with everything you just said. I moved from hardwood and tile to carpet and linoleum . Once the carpet has to be replaced its going to be hardwood or pergo. I think pergo as i don't believe you can install hardwood on concrete
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:12:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I agree with everything you just said. I moved from hardwood and tile to carpet and linoleum . Once the carpet has to be replaced its going to be hardwood or pergo. I think pergo as i don't believe you can install hardwood on concrete
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.

Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.

Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.

Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.



I agree with everything you just said. I moved from hardwood and tile to carpet and linoleum . Once the carpet has to be replaced its going to be hardwood or pergo. I think pergo as i don't believe you can install hardwood on concrete


You can certainly lay wood on concrete.  I won't hijack this thread but some quick google searches can answer most of your questions.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 2:42:26 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


You can certainly lay wood on concrete.  I won't hijack this thread but some quick google searches can answer most of your questions.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.

Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.

Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.

Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.



I agree with everything you just said. I moved from hardwood and tile to carpet and linoleum . Once the carpet has to be replaced its going to be hardwood or pergo. I think pergo as i don't believe you can install hardwood on concrete


You can certainly lay wood on concrete.  I won't hijack this thread but some quick google searches can answer most of your questions.

I was under the impression you had to lay some sort of sub floor, even if its an inch or so, to separate the wood from the floor. I mean you got to nail that shit to something. Raising everything on the bottom floor by two inches would be a real PITA.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 2:51:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 3:40:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 4:11:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Be very careful not to hit the tension cables in your slab if you have them.


What's the best way to determine where the are?


Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.


They way we always did it was to sink the bit of the roto-hammer into the concrete without forcing it. It should go in fairly smooth. If it doesn't, STOP! Figure out how to make do with a hole somewhere else.  

A roto-hammer hitting a cable feels way different than going through concrete.

When the bit stops going in and no more concrete dust is coming out of the hole, chances are there is something under your bit you shouldn't be messing with.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 4:46:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I glued my bamboo floor to the slab in my old house.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
As a former Carpet installer, I would mark where the safe is and cut out the square that it will sit in, or at least cut a flap to fold back. The safe sitting on the rug will crush the fibers in the rug and leave a permanent impression. If you make a clean cut with a razor knife, a good carpet man can put it back in if the safe is ever removed.

Of course, as a former carpet installer, after years of replacing carpet in homes, I removed the carpet from my house.

Carpet is a nasty, dirt & germ holding, allergy enhancing crap trap. I don't care how clean you think you got it, how high end your vacuum is, orhow many times you had it steam cleaned, it's nasty at the bottom.

Had to go in my house. Wood and tile. Nothing I can't mop with Pine-sol & bleach.



I agree with everything you just said. I moved from hardwood and tile to carpet and linoleum . Once the carpet has to be replaced its going to be hardwood or pergo. I think pergo as i don't believe you can install hardwood on concrete


You can certainly lay wood on concrete.  I won't hijack this thread but some quick google searches can answer most of your questions.

I was under the impression you had to lay some sort of sub floor, even if its an inch or so, to separate the wood from the floor. I mean you got to nail that shit to something. Raising everything on the bottom floor by two inches would be a real PITA.


I glued my bamboo floor to the slab in my old house.

this is where i got my info.

http://www.hardwoodinfo.com/articles/view/pro/28/241



this thread is now about installing hardwood flooring  
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 4:51:40 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Those will work, and that is a great brand.

I prefer the wedge style though.

Put safe in place, once, leave it there.  Drill proper sized holes, vacuum dust out, pound anchors in, use large fender washers, tighten nuts down, cut off extra length on the anchors, done.

Some pics of when I did mine.  Took me about 20 minutes.

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc257/david448/PlatinumPlace/IMG_2983.jpg~original

After:

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc257/david448/PlatinumPlace/IMG_2990.jpg~original
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Here is the type of anchor you want to use.  It sits flush to the floor.  Put the safe
where you want it, then you have a jig in place, mark the drill spots through the bottom of
the safe, move safe, insert anchors, move safe back and install machine bolts into anchor.

http://www.toolbarn.com/redhead-rm-12.html?gclid=CMXovajcvrkCFctAMgodG04AKg



Those will work, and that is a great brand.

I prefer the wedge style though.

Put safe in place, once, leave it there.  Drill proper sized holes, vacuum dust out, pound anchors in, use large fender washers, tighten nuts down, cut off extra length on the anchors, done.

Some pics of when I did mine.  Took me about 20 minutes.

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc257/david448/PlatinumPlace/IMG_2983.jpg~original

After:

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc257/david448/PlatinumPlace/IMG_2990.jpg~original


Good luck when it is time to move the safe.  The safe will need to be picked up over the bolts.
You need an anchor that sits flush to the concrete and a bolt that inserts into it.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 4:58:09 AM EDT
I saw this suggested once but have not tried it.  Get some pipe that will fit through the mounting holes at the bottom of your safe.  Once it is in place, put the pipe in the hole and bang on it a few times to cut through the carpet.  I think the guy who suggested it said to use a copper pipe and to sharpen the end a bit if you can.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:01:48 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 9:09:42 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

They way we always did it was to sink the bit of the roto-hammer into the concrete without forcing it. It should go in fairly smooth. If it doesn't, STOP! Figure out how to make do with a hole somewhere else.  

A roto-hammer hitting a cable feels way different than going through concrete.

When the bit stops going in and no more concrete dust is coming out of the hole, chances are there is something under your bit you shouldn't be messing with.
View Quote


The other thing is if you feel the resistance change pull the hammer out immediately. If you see brightly colored plastic pieces you've come in contact with a cable. The key is to stop immediately so you only puncture the plastic wrap on the cable. We've used X Ray Companies to scan the slab but we found they are 50/50 at best.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 9:26:18 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Cut away the carpet underneath the safe, or you'll be wasting your time.

The carpet will allow a void beneath the safe for a potential thief to insert pry bars beneath.
View Quote



The other reason for doing this is because leaving the carpet will mash it and it will not recover.  If you cut out a piece, you can then put it back if you move.  A carpet seamer/iron can glue it back in.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 9:40:01 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Be very careful not to hit the tension cables in your slab if you have them.


What's the best way to determine where the are?


Unless you live in a High Rise Building I would not worry.


Many slab homes have post tension slabs.  Cutting a tendon can be a life safety event.  This is not something to take lightly or to suggest to someone.  Russian roulette would be a similar game to play.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:18:36 AM EDT
You could also just use a quart of marine expoy a layer or 2 of fiberglass mat between the bottom of the safe and cement
and that sucker will NEVER EVER move.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:31:29 AM EDT
My safes are on a bare concrete slab but I do not use any hardware to anchor them.  I flip the safe on its side and put a ring of silicone around the bottom about 3 in from the edges.  Then I flip it right side up. The silicone combined with the weight of the safe forms an air tight seal that keeps the safe anchored with suction.  It is rock solid and cannot be moved.  If you want to move it then all you have to do is run a putty knife around the bottom.
Top Top