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Posted: 8/31/2004 2:10:24 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:12:06 PM EST
Crisco
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:12:15 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:13:55 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:14:26 PM EST
Fry up lots of bacon, and repeat, never wash it with soap and water just wipe clean, and rub some vegi oil on it, for storage.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:14:44 PM EST
From Lodge Manufacturing, makers of cast iron cookware:

Use & Care of your Natural Finish Lodge Cast Iron Cookware
Your new cookware will last a lifetime with proper care and seasoning. Seasoning is the process of allowing oil to be absorbed into the iron, which creates a natural non-stick, rustproof finish. It is actually a very simple process. Here's how to do it:

1. Wash new cookware with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush.

2. Rinse and dry completely.

3. Apply a thin coat of melted vegetable shortening (i.e. Crisco) to the entire surface (including lid if applicable), both inside and out.

4. Line the lower oven rack with aluminum foil (To catch any drippings), and preheat oven to 350° F.

5. Place cookware upside down on the upper oven rack, and bake for one hour.

6. Turn oven off and let cookware cool before removing from oven.

7. Store in a cool, dry place. If you have a lid for your utensil, place a folded paper towel between the lid and the utensil to allow air to circulate.

8. NEVER wash in dishwasher.

9. If your utensil develops a metallic smell or taste or shows signs of rust, never fear. Wash with soap and hot water, scour off rust, and reseason.

After use: Clean using a stiff brush and hot water only (do not wash in dishwasher). Towel dry immediately and apply a light coating of vegetable oil to cookware while still warm.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:16:05 PM EST
I use either Crisco, OR bacon grease.

Once seasoned, it shouldn't see soap or water again Scrub out sticky parts with coarse salt and a paper towel, but leave all the other goodies in the pan. Just a wipe out with a paper towel (while still hot), and it'll just keep getting blacker and blacker. The blacker the skillet, the better!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:20:30 PM EST
I have several cast iron pieces.
If properly seasoned and cared for, they
are as good as any contemporary non-stick surface.
One thing to consider; the piece you buy should not have
a rough texture to its finish. Many current brands do. As a
cost cutting measure, their surface has not been properly
smoothed. As a result, food will stick to the surface.
Find some older cast iron ware and look at its surface-inside and
out. It will be smooth.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:25:38 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:26:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By DPeacher:
Crisco

+1
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:29:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:34:09 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:39:57 PM EST
damn, i thought my backwoods ass was the only one who still did this.

lard or bacon grease. always store w/ cooking oil on it.
my grand dad cures them packed in coals from an open fire. the stove works for me.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:40:52 PM EST
Any ol' vegetable oil. Or bacon grease. Or something else. It doesn't much matter because the oils of various things you cook on it will become part of the seasoning.

And Pete really doesn't give a flip, FYI.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:44:47 PM EST
Bacon. Have BLT's for lunch for a few days and whoala, a seasoned skillet.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:49:18 PM EST
+1 on Crisco & Lodge directions (although you can go a little higher, say 375-400)

the rough/smooth surface deal has been beaten to death on usenet (bottom line: a properly seasoned skillet, smooth or rough, will do well) In the old days, manufacturers would smooth out the cooking surface (Google Wagner & Griswold cast iron), in practice, a well-seasoned skillet will be as non-stick as the best AllClad out there (whether smooth or rough)

Definitely do the hot soapy water wash up front to remove waxy coatings, then hot water rinse and immediately dry in oven or over flame, hit it with Crisco (or run some bacon through it, smearing the grease everywhere) as per Lodge instructions.

Cast Iron is great stuff, AD Livingston has a good book on cast iron cooking, enjoy!

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 2:54:53 PM EST
+1 for Crisco.

My cornbread falls right out when I turn the pan over.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:12:38 PM EST

I have an old Wagner skillet which is smooth and newer Lodge skillet which is fairly rough. Once seasoned, I can't tell the difference in cooking or cleanup. I started the seasoning with Crisco, but then cooked bacon and cheap hamburgers in it. If you haven't already bought the pans, Lodge offers pre-seasoned pots and pans now.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:12:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2004 3:13:26 PM EST by kpel308]
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:18:23 PM EST
Lard or bacon grease for sure. Crisco is just a poor imitation of the real stuff.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:19:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By BallisticTip:
Fry up lots of bacon, and repeat, never wash it with soap and water just wipe clean, and rub some vegi oil on it, for storage.




+1
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:30:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Lard or bacon grease for sure. Crisco is just a poor imitation of the real stuff.



Hey! they don't sell lard outside Georgia everywhere!


(whooo doggy, this should be good)

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:37:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By Merrell:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Lard or bacon grease for sure. Crisco is just a poor imitation of the real stuff.



Hey! they don't sell lard outside Georgia everywhere!


(whooo doggy, this should be good)


You're on the internet, mail order it. It must suck to be a yankee....
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:44:24 PM EST
I have one cast iron griddle , It took me a long time to find one with a satin smooth finish .
I seasoned it in a turkey fryer using 450° peanut oil , then coating it with a paste of salt , flour and
oil . Put that mess on the BBQ and cook it till black at 500+° . After that rub the residue
off with a brass brush and wipe it down with an oil with a high smoke point .
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:45:24 PM EST
ya want some grits with that post?

OK, so I Google "lard" and not much is coming up (except perhaps dinner... *urp* )

did find out to make homemade lard though...


yum... *urp*

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:45:59 PM EST
Lard? Hell, it's a government entitlement in Texas. It's everywhere. Many grocery stores stock it in 5 gallon pails. And you'd be surprised at how much lard Texans sneak around with under their shirts and pants!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:50:17 PM EST
actually the idea for putting 'em in the oven is a bad thing.

smoke all over the house. stinks. i stick mine on the grate of the gas grill outside, coat it with lard and fire the baby up to about 450 or so for about an hour.

let it cool, then do it again. and again. and again. i got lotsa cool cast iron. best surface ever for eggs.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:50:55 PM EST
bacon grease all over it then place in your outside grill and lower the top

clean and no mess.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:53:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By kpel308:
Get a big-assed heavy cast iron skillet, too, for doing your steaks in! (search STEAK for my cooking method) The heavier, the better, as the more massive it is, the more heat it stores.



Had to go search for it. There's been plenty of topics on "Steaks" lately. Luckily I found it on the 5th page I read. That's 4 pgs in the first thread and first page in the second thread. But it was worth it.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=269210
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:53:55 PM EST
not that it has any relevance to cooking (hopefully), but I found this lovely LARD LAMP on eBay...

It's perfect, but where to put it...


Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:54:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By Merrell:
ya want some grits with that post?

OK, so I Google "lard" and not much is coming up (except perhaps dinner... *urp* )

did find out to make homemade lard though...


yum... *urp*


Grits? You probably put sugar in them, so no thanks.

You're right, though, fake fat is so much more appetizing....
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:01:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
ya want some grits with that post?

OK, so I Google "lard" and not much is coming up (except perhaps dinner... *urp* )

did find out to make homemade lard though...


yum... *urp*


Grits? You probably put sugar in them, so no thanks.

You're right, though, fake fat is so much more appetizing....



hey cat is a slice of american cheese in your grits considered ok ?
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:04:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
ya want some grits with that post?

OK, so I Google "lard" and not much is coming up (except perhaps dinner... *urp* )

did find out to make homemade lard though...


yum... *urp*


Grits? You probably put sugar in them, so no thanks.

You're right, though, fake fat is so much more appetizing....



hey cat is a slice of american cheese in your grits considered ok ?

Cheese is approved for use in grits, it's even better if you also add some crumbled bacon. Butter, salt, pepper, bacon, sausage, ham, and cheese are all acceptable.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:06:52 PM EST
Bacon grease is the best..
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