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Posted: 1/5/2012 7:10:08 AM EDT
I love scrapple. But I have problems cooking it at home.

Anyone have any pointers?
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:11:58 AM EDT
Cast iron with plenty of bacon grease.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:13:52 AM EDT
Lower heat so it cooks more thoroughly before it begins to burn.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:14:05 AM EDT
I've seen people cook it in a dry pan.

But I've always had problems with it smoking and getting burnt. I guess I need to adjust the heat.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:14:10 AM EDT
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:14:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Cast iron with plenty of bacon grease.
Dirty jobs had an episode on that stuff.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:14:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


Beak?
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:15:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:15:24 AM EDT by VBC]
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


The reason why kids are mealy and have squishy spines today is because they don't have any scrapple in their diet.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:15:37 AM EDT
the thinner the better!

try deep frying it too
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:18:02 AM EDT
It's all about the cut. Not too thick, not too thin. Magic happens around 3/16" thick, but I couldn't tell you exactly. You just learn just how to cut it. Also, use a wire cheese knife.

Cast iron is the way to go. Dry pan. Scrapple has plenty of fat to help out the cooking process. You want it medium hot, about where you'd sautee onions at. On my stove, it's a 6 and a half out of 10. You'll have to learn your stove.

It should be lightly crispy on the outside, and soft and moist on the inside. Serve between two pieces of white toast with a little butter and two eggs while it's still hot enough to burn you that you need to bite just a little gingerly.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:20:01 AM EDT
The problem most people have with cooking Scrapple at home, comes from them trying to turn it over too soon in the pan, or slicing it too thin in the first place! try slicing it so it is approx. 1/2 inch, place in a non-stick pan, preheated with a little oil, let it stay there until it is fully browned on that side, flip it once, let it fully brown on that side. Done! too much handling will cause it to crumble. Scrapple should be Crispy on the outside! I like mine with a little Syrup!
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:20:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VBC:
Lower heat so it cooks more thoroughly before it begins to burn.


Winner.

You;ve got to be patient. At the right temp it takes a while...significantly longer than bacon.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:20:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
It's all about the cut. Not too thick, not too thin. Magic happens around 3/16" thick, but I couldn't tell you exactly. You just learn just how to cut it. Also, use a wire cheese knife.



This man knows
Right about 3/16" and crispy as hell on each side makes for perfect scrapple


Speed
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:21:22 AM EDT
Low heat to render off fat and then brown without burning.

High heat seals off the fat before it can render enough to allow cooking without burning.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:22:19 AM EDT
I assume you're frying it? A lot of it will depend on how you like it. I like my scrapple cut to medium thickness and crispy on the outside. I usually just throw it into a pan with a goodly amount of oil and fry until the outside is nice and crispy but you retain the hot softer texture inside.

If you cut it too thin you will end up with a rather crispy shingle (which isn't so bad) but IMO you lose out on a lot of the flavor of scrapple by foregoing the softer stuff. If you cut it too thick you will have a hard time getting the inside to the proper temperature. Mushy scrapple is not for me, but some folks like it that way.

By the way, Rapa makes scrapple with bacon.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:23:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rwalters17:
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


Beak?
Never know... I'll IM you a shipping address just in case.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:25:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


The reason why kids are mealy and have squishy spines today is because they don't have any scrapple in their diet.
That must be in, it's a super food!



Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:26:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:26:36 AM EDT by stockshift]
Originally Posted By rwalters17:
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


Beak?


Given that scrapple is a product of the Pennsylvania Dutch (a verbal bastardization of the word "Deutsch"), who reportedly use "everything but the oink" in a pig to make scrapple, I am failing to see how any beak could make it into properly made scrapple.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:26:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
It's all about the cut. Not too thick, not too thin. Magic happens around 3/16" thick, but I couldn't tell you exactly. You just learn just how to cut it. Also, use a wire cheese knife.



This man knows
Right about 3/16" and crispy as hell on each side makes for perfect scrapple


Speed


I've been cooking scrapple since I was tall enough to reach the stove.

I know some folks think it's gross (personally, I think it's offal ), but that crunchy-yet-soft goodness is one of my favorite things to eat. Like cheesesteaks, mac and cheese, spaghetti and meatballs... I could eat it for every meal and never get bored.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:27:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:28:40 AM EDT by 1srelluc]
PAM...in a non-stick griddle. All you need to know. Not too much of it either. Don't let the edges touch each other as they will bind together.

Also never freeze scrapple as the moisture when it thaws will cause it to break-apart if there is a half-way decent amount of meat in it.

Broth and corn-meal so-called scrapple not so much of a problem with freezing it.


BTW....The Rappa-Brand scrapple with bacon sucks.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:28:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
It's all about the cut. Not too thick, not too thin. Magic happens around 3/16" thick, but I couldn't tell you exactly. You just learn just how to cut it. Also, use a wire cheese knife.



This man knows
Right about 3/16" and crispy as hell on each side makes for perfect scrapple


Speed


I've been cooking scrapple since I was tall enough to reach the stove.

I know some folks think it's gross (personally, I think it's offal ), but that crunchy-yet-soft goodness is one of my favorite things to eat. Like cheesesteaks, mac and cheese, spaghetti and meatballs... I could eat it for every meal and never get bored.
I'm a relative newcomer to scrapple as I never ate it till I visited some friends in central PA about 6 years ago...now I get it anytime I see it on a menu


Speed

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:28:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:35:23 AM EDT by callgood]
I'm 0 for 1.

We got a cookbook when we married with recipes from around the country.

Our batch of scrapple went into the trash.

IIRC it was like some sort of deranged Thanksgiving dressing.


eta: from food.com

NOTE: the meat involved is Pork head, meat, feet, heart and tongue, or other pork trimmings, if desired, including liver.


I feel real confident we didn't use any of the above. Probably used sausage so our slop wasn't official scrapple.

(I'm a big fan of head cheese, but my wife would take a raincheck on the above pork parts!)
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:28:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By stockshift:
Originally Posted By rwalters17:
Originally Posted By EightySecond:
Dibs on anything if value after you choke on a chunk of hoof or beak.


Beak?


Given that scrapple is a product of the Pennsylvania Dutch (a verbal bastardization of the word "Deutsch"), who reportedly use "everything but the oink" in a pig to make scrapple, I am failing to see how any beak could make it into properly made scrapple.
LOL, I know you guys up there take scrapple seriously.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:29:35 AM EDT
Habbersette

Slice thin, cook low and slow in a little butter or bacon grease. It can take 20 minutes to do properly.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:30:20 AM EDT
Scrapple? You Yankees sure eat some nasty stuff...
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:31:26 AM EDT
DEEP FRY IT.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:32:21 AM EDT
Livermush > Scrapple


Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:34:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By wildearp:
DEEP FRY IT.


Have you tried it?

We did it once at hunt-camp once and it was just OK. That said it was some of that corn-meal and broth crap.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:34:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:36:48 AM EDT by rod727]
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Livermush > Scrapple




pon haus = scrapple I thinks....

This thread needs pics...
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:35:03 AM EDT
I can't think of Scrapple without remembering Ed. He was from Delaware and loved Scrapple. I couldn't begin to guess his weight, he had a quintuple (I think it was) bypass about 10 years ago that never healed right, and would have died from diabetes if the fat clogging his arteries didn't get him first.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:36:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 1srelluc:
BTW....The Rappa-Brand scrapple with bacon sucks.


+1

They throw the "with bacon" thing in there I guess to convince people to buy it. I'll admit, it worked on me. Once.

Scrapple is a beauteous and simple thing. You can't improve it. It just is.

As for brands, Hatfield used to be my old standby, but now all I can get is RAPA. It's still good, but not as good. I know some purists out there won't even touch the corn meal stuff, but it's all I can get in MD. Trust me, I'd love to go to a country butcher and buy it fresh, but it's just not in the cards.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:37:21 AM EDT
Scrapple is a Yankee name for liver mush or liver pudding. Neese's brand is the best. Rapa doesn't season their Yankee version enough.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:38:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Wyzardd:
I can't think of Scrapple without remembering Ed. He was from Delaware and loved Scrapple. I couldn't begin to guess his weight, he had a quintuple (I think it was) bypass about 10 years ago that never healed right, and would have died from diabetes if the fat clogging his arteries didn't get him first.



As a Delaware expatriate, I hoist my Yuengling to Ed's memory. All men should aspire to live as he did.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:38:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:42:17 AM EDT by callgood]
Originally Posted By Flamicane:
Scrapple? You Yankees sure eat some nasty stuff...


I have a Louisiana cookbook with a recipe for everything from seafood to chipmunk, so I guess you are an authority.

Originally Posted By rod727:
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Livermush > Scrapple


pon haus = scrapple I thinks....

This thread needs pics...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/800px-Plate_of_scrapple.jpg


The side of the scrapple in the pic looks like head cheese.

I wonder if I could just chicken fry some souse and invent a southern version.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:41:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
As for brands, Hatfield used to be my old standby, but now all I can get is RAPA. It's still good, but not as good. I know some purists out there won't even touch the corn meal stuff, but it's all I can get in MD. Trust me, I'd love to go to a country butcher and buy it fresh, but it's just not in the cards.


Sad to say, Rapa is fast becoming the only brand of scrapple available in large grocery stores in some parts of SE PA and northern DE. As an example, I live in downtown Philly and I'd have to walk about a mile before I could find a grocery store that carries any scrapple at all. I'd rather walk to Reading Terminal Market and get the real deal from the butchers there.

There's an Acme near Concord DE (off Route 202) that no longer carries cornmeal mush (another SE PA favorite) and only has one or two brands of scrapple on the shelf. It's a crying shame.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:43:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By callgood:
Originally Posted By Flamicane:
Scrapple? You Yankees sure eat some nasty stuff...


I have a Louisiana cookbook with a recipe for everything from seafood to chipmunk, so I guess you are an authority.



Pffft. We don't have chipmunks here.

Do y'all really grind up pork and pork livers and then eat it. Gross, I've never heard of anybody down here cooking something like that.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:44:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
Originally Posted By 1srelluc:
BTW....The Rappa-Brand scrapple with bacon sucks.


+1

They throw the "with bacon" thing in there I guess to convince people to buy it. I'll admit, it worked on me. Once.

Scrapple is a beauteous and simple thing. You can't improve it. It just is.

As for brands, Hatfield used to be my old standby, but now all I can get is RAPA. It's still good, but not as good. I know some purists out there won't even touch the corn meal stuff, but it's all I can get in MD. Trust me, I'd love to go to a country butcher and buy it fresh, but it's just not in the cards.


There are a couple of local butcher shops that carry good scrapple but Rappa-Brand is pretty much the stand-by. My Aunt made Scrapple to kill for.

Have you ever tried scrapple gravy? I had some left-over (bought the large package on sale) once and just made it like sausage-gravy and it was really good over hot biscuits the next morning.

Yeah, the "with bacon" got me once....We tossed it it sucked so bad. Some things should not be messed-with.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:44:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:47:44 AM EDT by hooligan223]
Originally Posted By Vermilion_Six:
Scrapple is a Yankee name for liver mush or liver pudding. Neese's brand is the best. Rapa doesn't season their Yankee version enough.


Scrapple is not the same as liver mush or liver pudding. I've had all three and they are not the same. Neese's Liver Pudding is the shit.

ETA: Neese's makes all three. http://www.neesesausage.com/products/default.htm
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:45:15 AM EDT
Always loved this picture

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:48:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By callgood:
Originally Posted By Flamicane:
Scrapple? You Yankees sure eat some nasty stuff...


I have a Louisiana cookbook with a recipe for everything from seafood to chipmunk, so I guess you are an authority.

Originally Posted By rod727:
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Livermush > Scrapple


pon haus = scrapple I thinks....

This thread needs pics...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/800px-Plate_of_scrapple.jpg


The side of the scrapple in the pic looks like head cheese.

I wonder if I could just chicken fry some souse and invent a southern version.



when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...



Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:50:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rod727:

when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/souse.jpg




Man, I've eaten a lot of questionable stuff (like Beverly bulk sausage) but I don't think I could bring myself to try that.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:53:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 7:56:27 AM EDT by 1srelluc]
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Originally Posted By Vermilion_Six:
Scrapple is a Yankee name for liver mush or liver pudding. Neese's brand is the best. Rapa doesn't season their Yankee version enough.


Scrapple is not the same as liver mush or liver pudding. I've had all three and they are not the same. Neese's Liver Pudding is the shit.

ETA: Neese's makes all three. http://www.neesesausage.com/products/default.htm


Man.....I ain't had good Pudding in a coon's age. Everyone that used to make it has died-off or is in a nursing home.

The last I had I bought off a Amish guy in PA near Belleville..

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:56:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Originally Posted By rod727:

when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/souse.jpg




Man, I've eaten a lot of questionable stuff (like Beverly bulk sausage) but I don't think I could bring myself to try that.


Try a thin slice on a soda cracker and chase it with a bit of sharp Cheddar.

My grandmother introduced me to souse when I was 5 or so before the "Yuck" reflex was in play.

I was also a big fan of raw oysters as a toddler. Had a pause when I could "appreciate" what they look like and rediscovered they when I was a teen.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:57:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Originally Posted By rod727:

when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/souse.jpg




Man, I've eaten a lot of questionable stuff (like Beverly bulk sausage) but I don't think I could bring myself to try that.


take every piece of scrap from the butcher shop you can find...add gelatinous mixture...pour into loaf pan...slice and enjoy....
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:59:25 AM EDT
My grandmother used to put flower on the scrapple before putting in. a cast iron pan.

I haven't had scrapple in close to 30 years.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:01:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rod727:
Originally Posted By callgood:
Originally Posted By Flamicane:
Scrapple? You Yankees sure eat some nasty stuff...


I have a Louisiana cookbook with a recipe for everything from seafood to chipmunk, so I guess you are an authority.

Originally Posted By rod727:
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Livermush > Scrapple


pon haus = scrapple I thinks....

This thread needs pics...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/800px-Plate_of_scrapple.jpg


The side of the scrapple in the pic looks like head cheese.

I wonder if I could just chicken fry some souse and invent a southern version.



when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/lsheets65/souse.jpg




Hey that almost looks like Hog's Head Cheese!

From Wikipedia:
The highly seasoned hog's head cheese is very popular as a cold cut or appetizer, especially with the Cajun people. A pig's foot provides the gelatin that sets the cheese, and vinegar is typically added to give a sour taste. Due to the French heritage of the state, this European-descended delight is widely eaten by many Louisianans. It is a popular Cajun food, and may also be known as souse meat or simply souse.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:03:18 AM EDT
Pro tip: The best source of scrapple is guys that will never have a website.

Ya gotta get some shit on your shoes if ya wanna eat like the almighty intended.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:10:07 AM EDT
1/4" thick if you like it crispy, spray frying pan first, be careful flipping it, cook till brown, serve, smile and try not to wonder what it's made of.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:12:06 AM EDT
I think my main problem is getting it set at the right heat.

It always ends up smoking.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:19:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rod727:

when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop here in Ohio....some of that stuff was just ....wow....

pon haus
Goetta
head cheese....how can this not be tempting...



Easy now...don't start knocking the Goetta!
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:27:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rwalters17:
I think my main problem is getting it set at the right heat.

It always ends up smoking.


You can also throw the scrapple on their immediately so it starts warming as the pan is warming up as well.

This method can also help a person cook an omelet properly if they have trouble finding the sweet spot temp of their stove at first.
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