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Posted: 7/30/2005 7:42:39 PM EDT
A question came up in another thread about sound under water.

Since sound needs moecules for it to occur and water is heavier than air, I assumed sound had a shorter travel in water than air.

What say you?

Sgat1r5
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:43:49 PM EDT
have u ever farted underwater in a public pool??
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:43:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2005 7:47:10 PM EDT by NimmerMehr]
The denser the medium. the fast sound travels.

air < water < metal

edit, as for a shorter travel, no.. the distance from the event and the observer is irrelevent to the density of the medium.

edit #2 Why in god's red mars did you even ask such a thing?

edit #3 Oh! Will the wave go father? Yes.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:44:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2005 7:45:03 PM EDT by NH_AR_Shooter]

Originally Posted By sgtar15:
A question came up in another thread about sound under water.

Since sound needs moecules for it to occur and water is heavier than air, I assumed sound had a shorter travel in water than air.

What say you?

Sgat1r5



Water transmits sound far better than air.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:44:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:
the dense the medium the fast sound travels.

air < water < metal



Okay, I understand that. But will it travel farther also?

Sgat1r5
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:45:24 PM EDT
yes
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:46:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:
the dense the medium the fast sound travels.

air < water < metal



Okay, I understand that. But will it travel farther also?

Sgat1r5



Yes, why do you think sonar can hear whales hundreds of miles away.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:46:12 PM EDT
If I'm not mistaken, sound travels 4 time faster in water.
CJ
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:51:56 PM EDT
Also remember the Ultra Low Frequency radio in (Michigan/Minnesota) that the Navy uses to communicate with submerged submarines around the world. Now the frequency is so low, and so slow, they do not transmit actual messages but rather a signal to come up to antenna depth and receive the intended message.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:53:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bumblebee_Bob:
Also remember the Ultra Low Frequency radio in (Michigan/Minnesota) that the Navy uses to communicate with submerged submarines around the world. Now the frequency is so low, and so slow, they do not transmit actual messages but rather a signal to come up to antenna depth and receive the intended message.



yes, but that is EM, not sound. off topic.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 7:56:00 PM EDT
Sound has far more "force" in water, it has recently been discoved that some whales and dolphins use sound as a weapon to stun or kill prey.

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 8:00:38 PM EDT
Sound travels much better in water.

Even better in metal

The denser the better for sound.

It's because it's a pressure wave. It needs a medium to travel through. the more medium thats there the better it travels. Unlike EM waves like light and radio(a form of light) which don't need a medium but are effected by mediums that they pass through.

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 8:05:09 PM EDT
If a bear farts in the forrest and no one's around to hear it, does it still make a sound?
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 8:06:41 PM EDT
If a tree falls in the forest and no one's around does somebody still protest?
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 8:07:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AssaultRifler:
If a bear farts in the forrest and no one's around to hear it, does it still make a sound?



Yes.

And it smells too.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:04:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:
Yes, why do you think sonar can hear whales hundreds of miles away.



I don't know...I HATE water!


Sgat1r5
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:08:19 PM EDT
Tell you what. You stick your head underwater and sing all the verses of the national anthem while I listen at my kitchen sink faucet.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:09:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Tell you what. You stick your head underwater and sing all the verses of the national anthem while I listen at my kitchen sink faucet.



Brb.................



Sgatr1`5
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:11:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2005 9:13:03 PM EDT by Bumblebee_Bob]

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By Bumblebee_Bob:
Also remember the Ultra Low Frequency radio in (Michigan/Minnesota) that the Navy uses to communicate with submerged submarines around the world. Now the frequency is so low, and so slow, they do not transmit actual messages but rather a signal to come up to antenna depth and receive the intended message.



yes, but that is EM, not sound. off topic.




topic -----> <----- me

Duuhhh


Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:27:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2005 9:38:09 PM EDT by olfajarley]
I'm gonna through my $.02 in here.....first i'd like to state that i just got out of the navy after 10 years as a submariner.....sound travels alot farther underwater.....a whole lot farther.....it was not uncommon to hear freight ships hundreds of miles away.......it works like this.....water is more dense so the molecules are more efficient at transfering the "wave" or energy of the sound. sound travels faster and farther underwater.....temperature, salinity, and water pressure(depth) all contribute to the SVP (sound velocity profile)


As far as radio trans......ELF is the type of transmission you are speaking of that subs use to receive messages submerged.....they travel into the earth and are thousands of feet from crest to crest. it doesn't take alot of data to say............ NUKE-EM......lol
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 9:33:27 PM EDT
Yes, water is much more incompressible than air so sound travels faster and farther. Much father.

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 10:19:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By olfajarley:
I'm gonna through my $.02 in here.....first i'd like to state that i just got out of the navy after 10 years as a submariner.....sound travels alot farther underwater.....a whole lot farther.....it was not uncommon to hear freight ships hundreds of miles away.......it works like this.....water is more dense so the molecules are more efficient at transfering the "wave" or energy of the sound. sound travels faster and farther underwater.....temperature, salinity, and water pressure(depth) all contribute to the SVP (sound velocity profile)




How does salt affect it?

SGat1r5
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 10:26:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

How does salt affect it?

SGat1r5



Check out www.dosits.org/science/sndmoves/1.htm

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 10:26:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

Originally Posted By olfajarley:
I'm gonna through my $.02 in here.....first i'd like to state that i just got out of the navy after 10 years as a submariner.....sound travels alot farther underwater.....a whole lot farther.....it was not uncommon to hear freight ships hundreds of miles away.......it works like this.....water is more dense so the molecules are more efficient at transfering the "wave" or energy of the sound. sound travels faster and farther underwater.....temperature, salinity, and water pressure(depth) all contribute to the SVP (sound velocity profile)




How does salt affect it?

SGat1r5



Halocline. Common where fresh water flows into a bay. Since fresh water is less dense, it floats on top of the salt water. This layer of water with slightly different density refracts the acoustics and can block or attenuate the signal.

Likewise with a thermocline.

Sound travels faster, only slightly faster, in higher density water. Therefore, cold, salty water has the fastest sound propagation.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 10:29:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red-Bucket-98:

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

How does salt affect it?

SGat1r5



Check out www.dosits.org/science/sndmoves/1.htm




THANKS!

So it must be hard to messure distance at times.

SGatr15
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 10:56:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

Originally Posted By Red-Bucket-98:

Originally Posted By sgtar15:

How does salt affect it?

SGat1r5



Check out www.dosits.org/science/sndmoves/1.htm




THANKS!

So it must be hard to messure distance at times.

SGatr15



I would guess ... YES
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 8:39:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red-Bucket-98:


Check out www.dosits.org/science/sndmoves/1.htm





Thank you for the link... I learned from it.
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