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Posted: 8/31/2008 6:02:33 AM EDT
SAS kills hundreds of terrorists in 'secret war' against al-Qaeda in Iraq
Hundreds of terrorists have been killed by the SAS waging a "secret war" against al-Qaeda in Iraq, The Sunday Telegraph can disclose.

By Sean Rayment, Defence Correspondent
Last Updated: 8:51AM BST 31 Aug 2008

More than 3,500 insurgents have been "taken off the streets of Baghdad" by the elite British force in a series of audacious "Black Ops" over the past two years.

It is understood that while the majority of the terrorists were captured, several hundred, who were mainly members of the organisation known as "al-Qa'eda in Iraq" have been killed by the SAS.

The SAS is part of a highly secretive unit called "Task Force Black" which also includes Delta Force, the US equivalent of the SAS.

The prime targets have been those intent on joining the wave of suicide car bombers that claimed around 3,000 lives a month in Baghdad at the height of the terrorist campaign in 2006.

Using intelligence gleaned from spies and informers, Task Force Black has nearly broken the back of the terrorist network and reduced bombings in Baghdad from about 150 a month to just two.

But the success of the covert mission came at a price – six members of the SAS were killed and more than 30 were injured. Delta Force has suffered in the region of 20 per cent casualties.

A senior British officer told The Sunday Telegraph: "We took over 3,500 terrorists off the streets of Baghdad in around 18 months.

"You could say it was a very successful period. But the butcher's bill was high. The attrition rate is equivalent to that experienced by the SAS during the Malayan insurgency 50 years ago.

“The relationship between the SAS and Delta Force is very close,” he added. “If anything, the attrition rate in Delta Force is higher. Two years ago the SAS made a donation to Delta Force’s 'widows and orphans’ fund of £10,000.”

Senior sources denied that the SAS was taking part in “extra-judicial killings” and added that any incident which appeared to be in breach of the British Army’s rules of engagement would be investigated internally by the unit and by the Royal Military Police if any wrongdoing was suspected.

The source said: “There is no shoot-to-kill policy in Iraq, but there are only a few ways of stopping a suicide bomber. A British lawyer is present during the planning stages of every operation and our troops operate under British rules, not American rules.”

The SAS began to concentrate almost exclusively on reducing the car bomb threat in Iraq at the same time that the US military launched its so-called “surge”, which saw an additional 30,000 American troops move into the most dangerous areas of Baghdad, in early 2007.

Gen David Petraeus, the head of the US forces in Iraq, who is due to leave his post shortly, has praised the courage of the SAS.

He said: “They have helped immensely in Baghdad … they have done a phenomenal job.”

In one incident, SAS troops rented a pink pick-up truck, removed their body armour to blend in with locals, and drove through the traffic to catch a key target.

“It was brilliant, actually,” Gen Petraeus said. “They have exceptional initiative, exceptional skill, exceptional courage and, I think, exceptional savvy. I can’t say enough about how impressive they are in thinking on their feet.”

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interesting



Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:04:32 AM EDT

Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:07:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By peekay:



+1
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:09:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:15:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:21:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 6:22:36 AM EDT by Sub-MOA]
Lies, half-truths and deliberate misinterpretation of fact spun into every syllable. Every word is designed to set-up the next lie. Filth oozes out of the thing like a feted sore.

I fucking loathe the U.K. press.

<ETA>

BZs SAS...
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:40:56 AM EDT
Crush  Kill  Destroy
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:45:37 AM EDT
Great job!

Time for round 2
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:47:27 AM EDT
Tag for later
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:47:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:53:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 6:56:08 AM EDT



Good work from our friends across the pond.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:10:51 AM EDT
So according to this, it wasn't the surge, it was the SAS (with a little help from Delta) that is breaking Al Queda's back in Iraq.



Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:15:55 AM EDT
If it is true it never should have been reported! STUPID!
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:16:05 AM EDT
cool
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:16:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 7:17:42 AM EDT by B00M]
I think its a bit much for them to give us all the credit, but well done to them all.

ETA: By us I mean the UK forces. Not that I'm in the SAS.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:17:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:23:15 AM EDT
Not all the British have been neutered.  
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:23:31 AM EDT


Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:25:51 AM EDT
"nice shot man"

Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:25:57 AM EDT
It is a team effort. Everybody has to do their own little bit.

Man, those guys that got smushed, are going to get only heck of a child support bill, 87 virgins or whatever.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:27:05 AM EDT
Bad Ass
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:33:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 7:39:24 AM EDT by gdblair]
The title should be changed to give credit.

SAS kills thousands of shitbag terrorists.



ETA- that means the SAS is responsible for over 252,000 popped cherries!
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 7:59:28 AM EDT

Task Force Black was the SAS contingent of Task Force 145.

Google search of Task Force 145 provides a lot of good info on this effort.

Great stuff.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:01:32 AM EDT
Nice.

Max
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:08:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BucsFan1:
Task Force Black was the SAS contingent of Task Force 145.

Google search of Task Force 145 provides a lot of good info on this effort.

Great stuff.

thx for the link
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:10:20 AM EDT
I'm OK with that.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:35:02 AM EDT
where's the problem?
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:42:28 AM EDT
Who Dares, Wins
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:47:25 AM EDT
There's something wrong with that?
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:48:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 8:49:43 AM EDT by vito113]

Originally Posted By ORIGINAL-Waterdog:


"You could say it was a very successful period. But the butcher's bill was high. The attrition rate is equivalent to that experienced by the SAS during the Malayan insurgency 50 years ago.

My old man won a medal in Malaya, and Borneo and Oman…

Senior sources denied that the SAS was taking part in “extra-judicial killings” and added that any incident which appeared to be in breach of the British Army’s rules of engagement would be investigated internally by the unit and by the Royal Military Police if any wrongdoing was suspected.

Well they would say that, wouldn't they.

Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:50:58 AM EDT
Ahhh, the old rented, pink pickup truck ruse...


60% of the time, it works every time.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:51:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By psgt:
Not all the British have been neutered.  


They will be when they go home.  You can't trust people with guns, or have you not heard?
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 8:52:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 8:53:56 AM EDT by Drilldo]
Not sure why it posted twice.

I blame the russians.
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 10:32:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Insider:

Originally Posted By psgt:
Not all the British have been neutered.  


They will be when they go home.  You can't trust people with guns, or have you not heard?


that's right and all Americans support PETA and live on a ranch
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 11:50:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Badger66:

Originally Posted By The_Insider:

Originally Posted By psgt:
Not all the British have been neutered.  


They will be when they go home.  You can't trust people with guns, or have you not heard?


that's right and all Americans support PETA and live on a ranch



Nah, some just live in the Moms basement and play Internet Badass…
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 10:41:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2008 10:41:59 PM EDT by streetfighter]
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 10:46:12 PM EDT
The SAS is pretty good at killing people, huh?
Link Posted: 8/31/2008 10:57:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BucsFan1:
Task Force Black was the SAS contingent of Task Force 145.

Google search of Task Force 145 provides a lot of good info on this effort.

Great stuff.


I strongly doubt they're called that any more.  They change names regularly.

That's all code-word stuff.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 2:52:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:

Originally Posted By BucsFan1:
Task Force Black was the SAS contingent of Task Force 145.

Google search of Task Force 145 provides a lot of good info on this effort.

Great stuff.


I strongly doubt they're called that any more.  They change names regularly.

That's all code-word stuff.


Agreed.

But to read up on what type of successes they are having, that is one place to look (TF145)

Before that, it could have been  Task Force 20 and surely many others.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 4:18:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 4:20:25 AM EDT
It sounds like their Northern Ireland experience is coming into play. After cloak-and daggering their way around Belfast in the '70s and '80s, this sort of op in Bagdad must seem like well known territory.

After all, the PIRA were true professionals, and the SAS spent quite a few years fighting their own nasty little private war against the Provos.


Link


Counterinsurgency Lessons from Northern Ireland


The British army recently released a study of the Northern Ireland conflict. Entitled "Operation Banner: an analysis of military operations in Northern Ireland", the report records "the major lessons from British military operations in Northern Ireland since 1969 in order to guide future commanders and staff officers".

I've summarized the study's findings on counterinsurgency as follows:

Preventative action

There is a need to identify situations which could lead to insurgency or civil war, and take "early, substantive, visible" action to address root political, social, economic and religious problems.
The early stages of a breakdown in social order are critical to the subsequent nature of the campaign. Subsequent decisions and actions of all parties are conditioned by early events. Violence early on creates bitterness and hatred which prolong conflict over generations.
Winning vs 'successful end-state'

Security forces do not 'win' counterinsurgencies militarily. At best they can contain or suppress the level of violence and, in doing so, convince the insurgents that they cannot achieve their aims through violence.
Single authority

There should be one authority, in overall charge, to coordinate the range of political, economic, social, legal, cultural, information and security operations. A strategic vision and a long-term campaign plan, which integrates strategic, operational and tactical activities, are vital.
Information, intelligence and local conditions

In a world with an "insatiable desire for information and news" an integrated multi-level information operations campaign is essential.
First rate intelligence structures, processes and capabilities are crucial. Operations should be 'intelligence-led'. Effectiveness of intelligence should be judged by what is gathered and how it is used.
The security forces must learn about local conditions (beliefs, myths, feelings, traditions, history, mores, ground rules), and try to understand the implications for operations.
Restraint

Security forces must exercise restraint when using force, and have the training and discipline to achieve this. The army should not over-react to provocation, e.g., deploying tanks against stone throwing rioters.
Indirect Approach, manoeuvre, and attrition

Effective counterinsurgency operations have a strong 'indirect' element, e.g., manoeuvring to cut-off a gunman's withdrawal rather than shooting it out; attacking terrorist finances rather than the terrorists themselves.
Manoeuvre should be emphasized, but some attrition is necessary. Major strikes against insurgents have shock value, and are important in shaping insurgent perceptions that they cannot win. But attrition can lead an insurgent organization to mutate into new and dangerous forms.
The initiative

Terrorists hold the initiative in that they choose the time and place of attack. The security forces can deny terrorists the initiative by conducting 'framework' operations that limit or remove the terrorists' freedom of action.
No magic formula

There is no magic formula that guarantees success. Organizations, methods and systems developed in one conflict can be exported to other theatres, but must be adapted to local conditions.


Link Posted: 9/3/2008 4:25:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2008 4:28:03 AM EDT by Jarhead_22]
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 4:29:29 AM EDT
A guiness for the lads of the SAS and Delta Force.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 5:29:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2008 5:30:13 AM EDT by Special-K]
I made a and face when I read that Delta has suffered a 20% casualty rate.  




-K
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 6:55:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Special-K:
I made a and face when I read that Delta has suffered a 20% casualty rate.  




-K


It may or may not be that high.  That portion of the military is VERY closed-mouthed.

Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:01:27 AM EDT
A whole-hearted cheers to the most badass group of allies we could ask for.


I wonder how much they expanded the SAS in regards to recruitment and training of additional men in order to carry out expanded operations.


- BG
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:08:14 AM EDT
All I can say is keep up the good work, because what they are doing is saving innocent people's lives.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:12:18 AM EDT
Hmm - so this begs the question... why is our Delta Force mortality rate so darn high?
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:14:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mister44:
Hmm - so this begs the question... why is our Delta Force mortality rate so darn high?


High tempo of operations, risk factor in in High Value Missions.  Just to name a few reasons.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:18:01 AM EDT
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