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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/22/2001 6:37:58 PM EDT
First I bought a relatively expensive gas powered weed wacker/brush cutter. It turned out to be the hardest starting, most unreliable POS power tool I have ever been unfortunate enough to own. Then I bought a cordless electric Weedwacker for light duty around the house. Fricking on switch only worked part time and it quit holding a power charge within 9 months. I went to Home Depot where I bought it, to maybe buy a new battery pack, since it was too expensive to just throw away at that point, and they said they no longer carry Ryobi because they had so many problems and Ryobi was not honoring their warranties. Six months before this, I had bought a Ryobi cordless drill because I liked the built in spirit level which would make drilling a straight hole easier. The fricking liquid drained out of the bubble by the second time I went to use it, and now it won't hold a charge either. Damn them to hell!!
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 6:42:10 PM EDT
Dewalt,Milwaukee and some Skill.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 6:44:10 PM EDT
DeWalt!, I know they don't make weed whackers, but if they did.... Did you buy it at Home Depot? That's part of the problem if you did.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 6:49:06 PM EDT
I have a Ryobi rotary tool(Dremel rip-off) and it works like a champ. Only problem was it took me months to get a flex shaft attachment from them for it.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 6:57:42 PM EDT
I also have a McCulloch chainsaw that can't maintain a chain tension adjustment through more than a couple 6 inch logs. Then the undersized chain bar studs twisted off from the constant loosening and tightening. I'm going to do some ballistic testing on all these tools soon..
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:02:48 PM EDT
black & decker baby!!!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:05:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2001 7:07:45 PM EDT by sherm8404]
Home Depot buys merchandise in such hugh quantity that many manufacturers let HD spec out their own version. I know this is true of lock sets, Stanley doors(1/4 inch less thick than regular Stanley doors), and I'm sure there's plenty of other stuff. They probaly have Ryobi biuld it cheeep to lower the price. Death to the Home Depot. Read my Home Depot tale of woe. [url]http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?id=35366[/url] Sherm
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:06:19 PM EDT
All my hand tools are strictly Craftsman...and some Stanley but My cordless stuff is Dewalt..............weed-wacker is Stihl.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:21:33 PM EDT
[red]PORTER CABLE[/red] and [yellow]DEWALT[/yellow] oh and [orange]Stihl[/orange] great stuff -bricklayer
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:24:40 PM EDT
I have at least 6 cordless tools made by Makita. They're the least expensive I would go without expecting problems. My rifle is a DeWalt, though. It works well too. [img]wsphotofews.excite.com/033/ON/VN/FN/Vo87095.jpg[/img] [url]www.cavalryarms.com[/url]
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:40:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2001 7:50:54 PM EDT by Ulysse_Nardin_1846]
ALL YOUR DEWALTS AND .45'S ARE BELONG TO US!!!! [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid26/p3b6f71244f2ee044b3fa5eb0e70ccdd8/fe393d9e.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:55:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 7:58:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:05:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSquid: Ryobi sucks my A$$. DeWalt ROCKS my world. [img]http://www.hunting-pictures.com/members/franksquid/Mvc-018s.jpg[/img]
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I hope you paid the BATF $200 making tax.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:10:09 PM EDT
Looks like Dewalt wind hands down. They got .223's and FrankSquids AOW.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:10:35 PM EDT
Ryobi sucks. Wouldn't use one if it was free -would sell it to some poor slob instead. Some buying tips: -B&D / Dewalt for cordless drills (B&D have same specs but less 'rugged' materials since they're mainly home use). Dewalt also makes cool sanders. -Porter cable for some cool pneumatic nailers. Bosch for the greatest jig saw of all time and a kick butt hammer drill. -Makita has really nice miter saws, angle grinders, and more. -Jet for some cool stationary tools (table saw, band saw, drill press, jointers, dust collection and filters) -Home depot's ridgid line actually has a couple nice pieces - 13" planer and oscillating belt/spindle sander. -Old crafstman powertools = good. new stuff=not so good- they switched their manufacturer- I believe it's actually ryobi. It used to be the people who now make ridgid tools. -Avoid coleman compressors! They sell under the 'black max' line at sams club as well. I went through 4 petcock drains and 3 shut off valves - the last one is still broken, but since it broke at the psi I use my compressor at, I haven't bothered to replace it yet. The parts you use most are flimsy, and they motor is loud as hell! -And if you're going to get a sawzall, don't bother getting anything but a milwaukee. They invented the dang thing, for pete's sake. Remember: Pay the money for the good stuff and you only cry once.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:33:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MoleEye: First I bought a relatively expensive gas powered weed wacker/brush cutter. It turned out to be the hardest starting, most unreliable POS power tool I have ever been unfortunate enough to own. Then I bought a cordless electric Weedwacker for light duty around the house. Fricking on switch only worked part time and it quit holding a power charge within 9 months. I went to Home Depot where I bought it, to maybe buy a new battery pack, since it was too expensive to just throw away at that point, and they said they no longer carry Ryobi because they had so many problems and Ryobi was not honoring their warranties. Six months before this, I had bought a Ryobi cordless drill because I liked the built in spirit level which would make drilling a straight hole easier. The fricking liquid drained out of the bubble by the second time I went to use it, and now it won't hold a charge either. Damn them to hell!!
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I agree. I'll give you $20 + shipping for the motor out of the weedwacker. The front bearing on mine failed.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:46:30 PM EDT
Allright all you Ryobi fishing reel owners please cast your reels into the nearest water outlet/inlet.
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 8:53:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2001 10:28:26 PM EDT
I have two Ryobi drills (one 18V cordless, one AC-powered) and just love the crap out of both of them — solid construction, great ergonomics, and excellent value. Absolutely no problems whatsoever with either of them. However, I have gotten to be pretty good at repairing Black & Decker string cutters. They seem to be good for about 2 summer months before something plastic breaks. Have put the local B&D/Dewalt repair depot on speed dial, and the parts counter man knows me by name... As for Craftsman power tools, I used to work in Division 9 at Sears (the tool section), and spent a good part of my time ringing up refunds on power tool returns. Most Craftsman shop tools are now made in China, and are of little better quality than the Harbor Freight cheapies...
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 2:00:41 AM EDT
Most Craftsman shop tools are now made in China
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I think you just broke my heart.... what to buy now?
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 3:41:18 AM EDT
As far as weedwackers go, I made the change from Ryobi to Stihl a while back. The difference is like night and day.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 3:49:26 AM EDT
All my hand tools are strictly Craftsman...and some Stanley but
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Stanley makes a large portion of Craftsman tools for Sears. The Best: Snap-On Second Place: MAC Tie For Second: MATCO Third: Craftsman ...all others Eddie
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 3:58:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2001 3:58:50 AM EDT by Jack-B-Nymble]
Eddie, I have to disagree. Crafstman tools are OK for someone's garage tool set, but for heavy industrial work, they don't cut the mustard. An example, check out one of their open end or combination wrenches. The metalurgy is so bad that the open end is much thicker than a quality wrench. You can't get them in a tight place to wrench a nut or bolt and they still will spring or break. Proto, Armstrong, and SK all make a better tool. Craftsman tools are on par with Huffy, Home Depot's brand. A real shame, because 30 years ago or so they were tops, except for Snap On. I do like their tapered extractors though.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 4:08:04 AM EDT
Only one brand worth consideration for serious work with power equipment-Husqvarna. Once you try one, you will never be happy with anything else. Dewalt or Milwaukee are the last word in electric tools. Hand tools? Snap-On of course.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 5:20:49 AM EDT
For the true professional craftsmen I'd suggest Makita Compound Slide saws for crosscuts, Skil Model 77 worm drive for framing, Porter cable sidewinder (blade left)saws, Porter cable routers or Bosch, all drills by HILTI (made in Litchtenstein and imported to OK !!!) built like Porsche Tanks....Spectra Physics Lasers...drywall screwguns by B&D with the aluminum nosepiece..all hand tools by American Mfg'r like Crescent, Klein, Channel-Lock...these are what I've seen on jobsites for over 20years in commercial work...you be the judge..
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 5:30:52 AM EDT
I use tools hard for a living. Craftsman is ok but it will break, bettr than B&D. Makita`s are the best balanced cordless drivers on the market. I`v tried almost all that are available. I chose the 14.4V Makita drill/driver. Best batteries available. I always found a good warranty means they expect it to break and will be nice about the misshap. Certain tools I know will not break. A skill worm drive is hands down the best saw. Pay for quality instead of quantity.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 5:34:30 AM EDT
Here`s a simple example; I needed a short phillips s/d, Snapon tool guyy was in the parking lot, I asked for one and he charged me 50.00 for a screwdriver. I really needed it and put the money down. ten years later that screwdriver has never let me down and the tip is exactly the same as the day I bought it. I cannot say that about any Craftsman products.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 6:08:23 AM EDT
Ok, here's the deal Ryobi stuff is a homeowner tool and an entry level one at that. It's not bad stuff just don't expect the world. Stihl, should stick with chain saws, it's what they do best and do it very well. Their trimmers arn't as good as the other high end pieces. McCullah (sp) is now out of any business so get parts while you can. Not bad stuff but they had a bad marketing/managing staff, had some parts issues. Macs are famous for bad coils, my dad has had many in his shop for bad coils only to replace them with 2 or 3 NEW FACTORY COILS and to find them bad as well! That and dealers got sick of them because they took MONTHS to pay warrantee claims to dealers and when they did they often paid by a voucher for more parts! If you want longevity pay the long buk up front and be happy for a long time. My dad has a commercial Toro weed eater that is 19 years old and was $320 then! Big $$$ but it still works great. He now sells Muryama and we own several pieces of their equipment. VERY high quality, very little sub-contracting of parts, make their own engines (they used to use alot of kawasaki engines but designed their own. The kawis are still VG). The entry level HOME OWNER model is $180, alot, but they start easy, run like a raped ape and have a fantastic warranty that the company stands behind, Made in the USA. Moral of the story spend the $$$, the bad taste of poor quality long outlasts the glee of getting a good deal. BrenLover
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 6:22:36 AM EDT
One word in weed eaters. Honda. After years of struggling with ever brand out there, I purchased a Honda 4/c weed eater and it's the most trouble free weed eater I've ever have own. It's four cycle is super smooth. I agree about the snap-on tools. They last and last. I refer to my Craftsman tools as Crapsman. Makita's and DeWalt's are in my cordless and power collection. They've never let me down. Chainsaws? My best luck has been with Jorgensen and Stihl.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 6:36:29 AM EDT
90% of my power tools are Porter Cable. I NEVER have problems with them. I also favor DeWalt. I do have a Stanley Bostich Framing nailer though...the only non-Porter Cable nailer I own...good stuff, and mostly made in the USA
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 7:15:18 AM EDT
We almost bought a Ryobi cordless drill. The guy at Home Depot was pushing them, swore they never got returns, blah, blah. Well the price was low, but I had this feeling it was too good to be true. Then I saw that their drill was made in China and I realized why they pushed those products - they were still making a pile of money on them, even at the low price. It just didn't feel right, so we shopped around some more and got an 18v Dewalt. I never regretted it. Great drill!! F'in Home Depot Liars!!
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 7:29:52 AM EDT
You're right ramjet, anyhting Honda isn't bad, they arguably have the best small engines out there. My dad is shopping for a new honda outboard. BrenLover
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 7:41:41 AM EDT
Have had an Echo trimmer since the mid '80s. No problems yet. [url]www.echo-usa.com[/url] Now Toro....well don't even get me started.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 7:54:19 AM EDT
Upper $ Echo is not bad but not as good as the other upper $$ stuff. Toro for the last several years has not been what it once was, very few of the small equipment makers are. quality and materials go down so prifits can go up. Some companies diversified to much and lost sight of their bread and butter ie. TroyBuilt (now bankrupt and bought out, terrible dealer support. Nothing like getting the wrong part 4 times!) BRenLover
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 10:33:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2001 10:33:52 AM EDT by LS1Eddie]
Proto, Armstrong, and SK all make a better tool. Craftsman tools are on par with Huffy, Home Depot's brand.
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Owned a set of SK sockets years ago. Finally threw them away. No better or worse than Craftsman (in regards to performance), but Craftsman has the edge in ease of replacement. Finding a local business to warranty SK proved impossible. Sears has a location on every street coner. Moot point anyway, since I replaced all my hand tools with Snap-On. [b]No one[/b] builds better hand tools. Someone mentioned Honda. I bought a Honda mower a couple of years ago. I expect to pass it on to my son. Eddie
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 11:38:12 AM EDT
MadMatt: Which weedwacker are you talking about? I threw away the gas one but still have the cordless one. LS1 Eddie: I bought a Honda self-propelled mower from a Honda shop about 3 1/2 years ago. The transmission went out the first of this summer. The repairman said it would cost a couple hundred dollars to fix. Now it's a push mower..
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 9:16:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MoleEye: MadMatt: Which weedwacker are you talking about? I threw away the gas one but still have the cordless one.
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The cordless electric one. Offer still stands. Alternatively, I could sell you the battery battery pack real cheap, but it would be more difficult to ship. It's pretty heavy, and sorta looks like a bomb, six cylinders with wires coming out of it. I don't think I'll be walking into a post office with it real soon. If you want to get yours running again, you might want to try putting a cheap motorcycle battery. Any 12V lead-acid battery will work. Just pull it apart, measure the battery pack, and see if you can find a battery that fits, maybe with some duct tape to hold it in place.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 9:29:18 PM EDT
I have have the Ryobi 14.4 volt cordless drill and Saw. Both with quick charge batteries, and with a smart charger, purchased for $100. from, you guessed it..... Home Depot. Maybe I just got lucky, but it's one of the best tool deals I have ever found.
Link Posted: 9/23/2001 10:18:52 PM EDT
I learned my Ryobi lesson years ago. Bought a sander, used it for one project, and threw it away. Mentioned my disdain at a tool counter once while shopping for a drill and the guy says, so Ryobi had one run of bad gears and now nobody wants them. I agree you have to buy quality up front. I bought a milwaukee cordless drill years ago and if you applied side load the right way, the gears would skip. My Porter Cable drill is great except the center of gravity is wrong. The balance is so far forward it will barely stand on the battery. If you have an accessory in the chuck forget it, you have to lay it down. I love my router though. Same basic design for years. Simple, usable, all the basics are great. Put grease on the base clamp screw though or it may strip on you. I think Delta quality has sunk to two levels above Ryobi. I had a Panasonic drill with a very unusual drive system. Variable Speed with full torque at the slowest speed. Loved it. I've never seen that on any other drill.
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